Sneha Girap

Southampton

Updated on
Share on FacebookTweet on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
Manager  Ronald Koeman
League  Premier League
Arena/Stadium  St Marys Stadium
Location  Southampton
Training ground  Staplewood
CEO  Gareth Rogers
Area  28.1 sq mi
Region  South East England
Population  253,651
Roster  Graziano PellèForward, Graziano Pellè, 19, Sadio ManéMidfielder, Sadio Mané, 10, Dušan Tadi?Midfielder, Dušan Tadi?, , Eljero EliaMidfielder, Eljero Elia, 22, Maya YoshidaDefender, Maya Yoshida, 3, Morgan SchneiderlinMidfielder, Morgan Schneiderlin, 4, Nathaniel ClyneDefender, Nathaniel Clyne, 2, Fraser ForsterGoalkeeper, Fraser Forster, 23, Ryan BertrandDefender, Ryan Bertrand, 21, Jay RodriguezForward, Jay Rodriguez, 9, Toby AlderweireldDefender, Toby Alderweireld, 17, José FonteDefender, José Fonte, 6, Victor WanyamaMidfielder, Victor Wanyama, 12, Shane LongForward, Shane Long, 7, Florin Gardo?Defender, Florin Gardo?, 5, Filip ?uri?i?Midfielder, Filip ?uri?i?, , Steven DavisMidfielder, Steven Davis, 8, Harrison ReedMidfielder, Harrison Reed, 38, Emmanuel MayukaForward, Emmanuel Mayuka, 24, James Ward-ProwseMidfielder, James Ward-Prowse, 16, Dominic GapeMidfielder, Dominic Gape, 46, Kelvin DavisGoalkeeper, Kelvin Davis, 1, Paulo GazzanigaGoalkeeper, Paulo Gazzaniga, 25, Omar RoweMidfielder, Omar Rowe, 37, Sam McQueenWinger, Sam McQueen, 45
Recent posts on Google+  

Southampton is the largest city in the ceremonial county of Hampshire on the south coast of England, and is situated 75 miles (121 km) south-west of London and 19 miles (31 km) north-west of Portsmouth. Southampton is a major port and the closest city to the New Forest. It lies at the northernmost point of Southampton Water at the confluence of the River Test and River Itchen, with the River Hamble joining to the south of the urban area. The local council is Southampton City Council, which is a unitary authority. The city represents the core of the Greater Southampton region, and the city itself has an estimated population of 253,651. The citys name is sometimes abbreviated in writing to "Soton" or "Soton", and a resident of Southampton is called a Sotonian.

Contents

Map of Southampton

Significant employers in Southampton include The University of Southampton, Southampton Solent University, Southampton Airport, Ordnance Survey, BBC South, the NHS, ABP and Carnival UK. Southampton is noted for its association with the RMS Titanic, the Spitfire and more generally in the World War II narrative as one of the departure points for D-Day, and more recently as the home port of a number of the largest cruise ships in the world. Southampton has a large retail park called West Quay which, although it employs just under 30 people, most of which are maintenance staff, has stores which collectively employ just under 800 people. In October 2014, the City Council approved a follow-up from the West Quay park, called Watermark WestQuay. Construction by Sir Robert McAlpine commenced in January 2015. The new centre is expected to employ 650 people once the construction is completed in Autumn 2016. Hammerson, the owners of the retail park, aim to have at least 1,550 people employed on its premises at year-end 2016.

Pov crane climb in southampton uk james kingston pov adventures


Despite the oft-expressed naked antipathy between the cities, most notably from amongst their football supporters, Southampton is sometimes considered together with Portsmouth and surrounding towns to form a single metropolitan area known as South Hampshire. This combined area has also been known as Solent City, particularly in the media when discussing local governance organisational changes. With a population of over 1.5 million this makes the region one of the United Kingdoms most populous metropolitan areas.

We are connected university of southampton tv advert full


History

Archaeological finds suggest that the area has been inhabited since the stone age. Following the Roman invasion of Britain in AD 43 and the conquering of the local Britons in 70 AD the fortress settlement of Clausentum was established. It was an important trading port and defensive outpost of Winchester, at the site of modern Bitterne Manor. Clausentum was defended by a wall and two ditches and is thought to have contained a bath house. Clausentum was not abandoned until around 410.

Southampton in the past, History of Southampton

The Anglo-Saxons formed a new, larger, settlement across the Itchen centred on what is now the St Marys area of the city. The settlement was known as Hamwic, which evolved into Hamtun and then Hampton. Archaeological excavations of this site have uncovered one of the best collections of Saxon artefacts in Europe. It is from this town that the county of Hampshire gets its name.

Viking raids from 840 onwards contributed to the decline of Hamwic in the 9th century, and by the 10th century a fortified settlement, which became medieval Southampton, had been established.

Following the Norman Conquest in 1066, Southampton became the major port of transit between the then capital of England, Winchester, and Normandy. Southampton Castle was built in the 12th century and by the 13th century Southampton had become a leading port, particularly involved in the import of French wine in exchange for English cloth and wool.

Surviving remains of 12th century merchants houses such as King Johns House and Canutes Palace are evidence of the wealth that existed in the town at this time. In 1348, the Black Death reached England via merchant vessels calling at Southampton.

The town was sacked in 1338 by French, Genoese and Monegasque ships (under Charles Grimaldi, who used the plunder to help found the principality of Monaco). On visiting Southampton in 1339, Edward III ordered that walls be built to close the town. The extensive rebuilding—part of the walls dates from 1175—culminated in the completion of the western walls in 1380. Roughly half of the walls, 13 of the original towers, and six gates survive.

The city walls include Gods House Tower, built in 1417, the first purpose-built artillery fortification in England. Over the years it has been used as home to the citys gunner, the Town Gaol and even as storage for the Southampton Harbour Board. Until September 2011, it housed the Museum of Archaeology. The walls were completed in the 15th century, but later development of several new fortifications along Southampton Water and the Solent by Henry VIII meant that Southampton was no longer dependent upon its fortifications.

On the other hand, many of the medieval buildings once situated within the town walls are now in ruins or have disappeared altogether. From successive incarnations of the motte and bailey castle, only a section of the bailey wall remains today, lying just off Castle Way. The last remains of the Franciscan friary in Southampton, founded circa 1233 and dissolved in 1538, were swept away in the 1940s. The site is now occupied by Friary House.

Elsewhere, remnants of the medieval water supply system devised by the friars can still be seen today. Constructed in 1290, the system carried water from Conduit Head (remnants of which survive near Hill Lane, Shirley) some 1.7 kilometres to the site of the friary inside the town walls. The friars granted use of the water to the town in 1310 and passed on ownership of the water supply system itself in 1420. Further remains can be observed at Conduit House on Commercial Road.

In 1642, during the English Civil War, a Parliamentary garrison moved into Southampton. The Royalists advanced as far as Redbridge, Southampton, in March 1644 but were prevented from taking the town.

During the Middle Ages, shipbuilding became an important industry for the town. Henry Vs famous warship HMS Grace Dieu was built in Southampton. Walter Taylors 18th century mechanisation of the block-making process was a significant step in the Industrial Revolution. From 1904 to 2004, the Thornycroft shipbuilding yard was a major employer in Southampton, building and repairing ships used in the two World Wars.

Prior to King Henrys departure for the Battle of Agincourt in 1415, the ringleaders of the "Southampton Plot"—Richard, Earl of Cambridge, Henry Scrope, 3rd Baron Scrope of Masham, and Sir Thomas Grey of Heton—were accused of high treason and tried at what is now the Red Lion public house in the High Street. They were found guilty and summarily executed outside the Bargate.

Southampton has been used for military embarkation, including during 18th-century wars with the French, the Crimean war, and the Boer War. Southampton was designated No. 1 Military Embarkation port during the Great War and became a major centre for treating the returning wounded and POWs. It was also central to the preparations for the Invasion of Europe in 1944.

Southampton became a spa town in 1740. It had also become a popular site for sea bathing by the 1760s, despite the lack of a good quality beach. Innovative buildings specifically for this purpose were built at West Quay, with baths that were filled and emptied by the flow of the tide.

The town experienced major expansion during the Victorian era. The Southampton Docks company had been formed in 1835. In October 1838 the foundation stone of the docks was laid and the first dock opened in 1842. The structural and economic development of docks continued for the next few decades. The railway link to London was fully opened in May 1840. Southampton subsequently became known as The Gateway to the Empire.

In his 1854 book "The Cruise of the Steam Yacht North Star" John Choules described Southampton thus: "I hardly know a town that can show a more beautiful Main Street than Southampton, except it be Oxford. The High Street opens from the quay, and under various names it winds in a gently sweeping line for one mile and a half, and is of very handsome width. The variety of style and color of material in the buildings affords an exhibition of outline, light and color, that I think is seldom equalled. The shops are very elegant, and the streets are kept exceedingly clean."

The port was the point of departure for the Pilgrim Fathers aboard Mayflower in 1620. In 1912, the RMS Titanic sailed from Southampton. Four in five of the crew on board the vessel were Sotonians, with about a third of those who perished in the tragedy hailing from the city. Southampton was subsequently the home port for the transatlantic passenger services operated by Cunard with their Blue Riband liner RMS Queen Mary and her running mate RMS Queen Elizabeth. In 1938, Southampton docks also became home to the flying boats of Imperial Airways. Southampton Container Terminals first opened in 1968 and has continued to expand.

The Supermarine Spitfire was designed and developed in Southampton, evolving from the Schneider trophy-winning seaplanes of the 1920s and 1930s. Its designer, R J Mitchell, lived in the Portswood area of Southampton, and his house is today marked with a blue plaque. Heavy bombing of the factory in September 1940 destroyed it as well as homes in the vicinity, killing civilians and workers. World War II hit Southampton particularly hard because of its strategic importance as a major commercial port and industrial area. Prior to the Invasion of Europe, components for a Mulberry harbour were built here. After D-Day, Southampton docks handled military cargo to help keep the Allied forces supplied, making it a key target of Luftwaffe bombing raids until late 1944. Southampton docks was featured in the television show 24: Live Another Day in Day 9: 9:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.

630 people lost their lives as a result of the air raids on Southampton and nearly 2,000 more were injured, not to mention the thousands of buildings damaged or destroyed.

Pockets of Georgian architecture survived the war, but much of the city was levelled. There has been extensive redevelopment since World War II. Increasing traffic congestion in the 1920s led to partial demolition of medieval walls around the Bargate in 1932 and 1938. However a large portion of those walls remain.

A Royal Charter in 1952 upgraded University College at Highfield to the University of Southampton. Southampton acquired city status, becoming the City of Southampton in 1964.

Geography

Southampton Beautiful Landscapes of Southampton

The geography of Southampton is influenced by the sea and rivers. The city lies at the northern tip of the Southampton Water, a deep water estuary, which is a ria formed at the end of the last Ice Age. Here, the rivers Test and Itchen converge. The Test—which has salt marsh that makes it ideal for salmon fishing—runs along the western edge of the city, while the Itchen splits Southampton in two—east and west. The city centre is located between the two rivers.

Southampton Beautiful Landscapes of Southampton

Town Quay is the original public quay, and dates from the 13th century. Todays Eastern Docks were created in the 1830s by land reclamation of the mud flats between the Itchen & Test estuaries. The Western Docks date from the 1930s when the Southern Railway Company commissioned a major land reclamation and dredging programme. Most of the material used for reclamation came from dredging of Southampton Water, to ensure that the port can continue to handle large ships.

Southampton Water has the benefit of a double high tide, with two high tide peaks, making the movement of large ships easier. This is not caused as popularly supposed by the presence of the Isle of Wight, but is a function of the shape and depth of the English Channel. In this area the general water flow is distorted by more local conditions reaching across to France.

The city lies in the Hampshire Basin, which sits atop chalk beds.

The River Test runs along the western border of the city, separating it from the New Forest. There are bridges over the Test from Southampton, including the road and rail bridges at Redbridge in the south and the M27 motorway to the north. The River Itchen runs through the middle of the city and is bridged in several places. The northernmost bridge, and the first to be built, is at Mansbridge, where the A27 road crosses the Itchen. The original bridge is closed to road traffic, but is still standing and open to pedestrians and cyclists. The river is bridged again at Swaythling, where Woodmill Bridge separates the tidal and non tidal sections of the river. Further south is Cobden Bridge which is notable as it was opened as a free bridge (it was originally named the Cobden Free Bridge), and was never a toll bridge. Downstream of the Cobden Bridge is the Northam Railway Bridge, then the Northam Road Bridge, which was the first major pre-stressed concrete bridge to be constructed in the United Kingdom. The southernmost, and newest, bridge on the Itchen is the Itchen Bridge, which is a toll bridge.

Economy

In March 2007 there were 120,305 jobs in Southampton, and 3,570 people claiming job seekers allowance, approximately 2.4 per cent of the citys population. This compares with an average of 2.5 per cent for England as a whole.

Culture, media and sport

The city is home to the longest surviving stretch of medieval walls in England, as well as a number of museums such as Tudor House Museum, reopened on 30 July 2011 after undergoing extensive restoration and improvement; Southampton Maritime Museum; Gods House Tower, an archaeology museum about the citys heritage and located in one of the tower walls; the Medieval Merchants House; and Solent Sky, which focuses on aviation. The SeaCity Museum museum is located in the west wing of the civic centre, formerly occupied by Hampshire Constabulary and the Magistrates Court, and focuses on Southamptons trading history and on the RMS Titanic. The museum received half a million pounds from the National Lottery in addition to interest from numerous private investors and is budgeted at £28 million.

Southampton Culture of Southampton

The annual Southampton Boat Show is held in September each year, with over 600 exhibitors present. It runs for just over a week at Mayflower Park on the citys waterfront, where it has been held since 1968. The Boat Show itself is the climax of Sea City, which runs from April to September each year to celebrate Southamptons links with the sea.

The largest theatre in the city is the 2,300 capacity Mayflower Theatre (formerly known as the Gaumont), which, as the largest theatre in Southern England outside London, has hosted West End shows such as Les Misérables, The Rocky Horror Show and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, as well as regular visits from Welsh National Opera and English National Ballet. There is also the Nuffield Theatre based at the University of Southamptons Highfield campus, which provides a venue for the Nuffield Theatre Company, touring companies, and local performing societies such as Southampton Operatic Society, the Maskers and the University Players.

There are many innovative art galleries in the city. The Southampton City Art Gallery at the Civic Centre is one of the best known and as well as a nationally important Designated Collection, houses several permanent and travelling exhibitions. The Millais Gallery at Southampton Solent University, the John Hansard Gallery at Southampton University as well as smaller galleries including the Art House in Above Bar Street provide a different view. The citys Bargate is also an art gallery run by the arts organisation "a space". A space also run the Art Vaults project, which creatively uses several of Southamptons medieval vaults, halls and cellars as venues for contemporary art installations.

In August 2009, work began on a significant project to create a Cultural Quarter in the city centre, on land adjacent to the Guildhall.

In 2013, Southampton appeared at number 4 in an updated edition of the humorous Crap Towns book, which rates the 50 worst towns and cities in the UK. The authors cited reasons for the inclusion of Southampton such as poor council governance, lack of amenities and culture, neglect of historical assets, brutalist post-war architecture, as well as relatively high rates of crime, drug-use and prostitution.

Southampton has two large live music venues, the Mayflower Theatre (formerly the Gaumont Theatre) and the Guildhall. The Guildhall has seen concerts from a wide range of popular artists including Pink Floyd, David Bowie, Delirious?, Manic Street Preachers, The Killers, The Kaiser Chiefs, Amy Winehouse, Lostprophets, The Midnight Beast, Modestep, and All Time Low. It also hosts classical concerts presented by the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, City of Southampton Orchestra, Southampton Concert Orchestra, Southampton Philharmonic Choir and Southampton Choral Society.

The city also has several smaller music venues, including the Brook, The Talking Heads, The Soul Cellar, The Joiners and Turner Sims, as well as smaller "club circuit" venues like Hamptons and Lennons, and a number of public houses including the Platform tavern, the Dolphin, the Blue Keys and many others. The Joiners has played host to such acts as Oasis, Radiohead, Green Day, Suede, PJ Harvey, the Manic Street Preachers, Coldplay, the Verve, the Libertines and Franz Ferdinand, while Hamptons and Lennons have hosted early appearances by Kate Nash, Scouting for Girls and Band of Skulls.

The city is home or birthplace to a number of contemporary musicians such as RnB singer Craig David, Coldplay drummer Will Champion, former Holloways singer Rob Skipper as well as 1980s popstar Howard Jones. Several rock bands were formed in Southampton, including Band of Skulls, The Delays, Bury Tomorrow, Heart in Hand, Thomas Tantrum (disbanded in 2011) and Kids Cant Fly (disbanded in 2014).

Expert insights on food colors and hyperactivity debating southampton study food color amounts


References

Southampton Wikipedia (,)http://www.oceanvillagesouthampton.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Early-sketch-of-Southampton-UK-Docks.jpg(,)http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/c7/Southampton_High_Street_1839_Drawn_by_GF_Sargent.jpg(,)http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~onbcgs/images/Bksouth_WEB.jpg(,)http://www.oocities.org/heartland/vista/7007/hotel.jpg(,)http://www.southampton.ac.uk/~imw/jpg-Sandbanks/7SB-Sandbanks-1585.jpg(,)http://www.classicliners.net/southamptonmv_761x600.jpg(,)http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/df/Bristol_Temple_Meads_railway_station_train-shed_engraving.jpg(,)http://pubshistory.com/Hampshire/Southampton/HorseGroom1850.jpg(,)http://i.ytimg.com/vi/yioquFOk9BA/maxresdefault.jpg(,)http://www.corridor-alliance.co.uk/GFX/Westbury%2520landscape2.jpg(,)http://blog.winiu.co.uk/wp-content/themes/blog/images/upload/2010/autumn-common/DSC_0722_blog.jpg(,)http://www.megalithic.co.uk/a558/a312/gallery/Competitions/2007_Competition/Castlerigg.jpg(,)http://www.fieldandlawn.com/media/11342/southampton%2520landscape.jpg(,)http://www.fotothing.com/photos/ff5/ff5bd8b0a05a8604b2bc5c7bc6bd5182.jpg(,)http://st.houzz.com/simgs/5a5138b900d20a60_4-2505/mediterranean-landscape.jpg(,)http://www.hants.gov.uk/landscape/images/hythearec.jpg(,)http://images.landscapingnetwork.com/pictures/images/636x510Max/backyard-landscaping_1/backyard-gas-fire-feature-fire-trough-beechwood-landscape-architecture-construction_2837.jpg(,)http://www.fotothing.com/photos/551/5514cb0aa487980672caea940b221629.jpg(,)http://blog.winiu.co.uk/wp-content/themes/blog/images/upload/2010/dec-winter/DSC_0888_blog-zoom.jpg(,)http://www.southamptonhistoricalmuseum.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/SH-Landscapes2-581x336.jpg(,)http://www.warehousenews.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/DELIVERING-landscape-container-port-at-DP-World-Southampton..jpg(,)http://www.literalscapes.co.uk/resources/Fotolia_4930161_S.jpg(,)http://st.houzz.com/simgs/b0b16a1a013f882a_4-8129/traditional-landscape.jpg(,)http://www.27east.com/assets/Article/63453/pleasure.JPG(,)http://www.thefoodfactoryuk.com/data/images1/2012_09191909120006.jpg(,)http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/02/b9/5e/0e/food-factory.jpg(,)http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/03/c5/ea/48/the-food-factory.jpg(,)http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/02/f3/a9/5c/food-factory.jpg(,)http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/02/b9/5e/0c/food-factory.jpg(,)http://www.southampton.yourmealticket.co.uk/media/members/000058/exterior-58-55.jpg(,)http://i.ytimg.com/vi/DrNW8xWb2lc/maxresdefault.jpg(,)http://www.thefoodfactoryuk.com/data/images1/soft_opening.jpg(,)http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/02/b9/5d/fd/food-factory.jpg(,)http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/03/2c/1c/a2/p-o-s-h-spices-indian.jpg(,)http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/01/c8/68/03/ground-floor-coco-rio.jpg(,)http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/05/ba/00/0e/the-rockstone.jpg(,)https://scontent.cdninstagram.com/hphotos-xap1/outbound-distilleryimage10/t0.0-17/OBPTH/558ab47225b211e389dc22000aa805fd_7.jpg(,)https://scontent.cdninstagram.com/hphotos-xpa1/outbound-distilleryimage4/t0.0-17/OBPTH/9147fa26242011e3916922000a1f9043_7.jpg(,)http://www.independent.co.uk/incoming/article7603482.ece/alternates/w620/4.jpg(,)http://louderthanwar.com/wp-content/uploads/Dr-Russ-Bestley-of-Watch-You-Drown.jpg(,)http://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/resources/images/3423416.jpg%3Ftype%3Darticle-full(,)http://splprod.stpaulslifestyle.netdna-cdn.com/uploads/april%252013%2520try%25202/DaveyJones%2520(640x413).jpg(,)http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/03225/lady_a_3225227k.jpg(,)http://www.dailyecho.co.uk/resources/images/3493660.jpg%3Ftype%3Darticle-full(,)http://www.mintsouth.com/2012/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/untitled-4722-620x350.jpg(,)https://40.media.tumblr.com/794df97f0419f6d309d0d938e4448214/tumblr_mjeusiPAbW1rdlrw3o1_500.jpg(,)http://www.dailyecho.co.uk/resources/images/2173463.jpg%3Fdisplay%3D1%26htype%3D100000%26type%3Dmc2(,)http://www.culturesouthampton.org.uk/sites/www.culturesouthampton.org.uk/files/styles/cs_large/public/arts%2520complex_0.jpg%3Fitok%3Dx-EbtN4v(,)http://images.cbazaar.com/EStoreAdmin/KnowledgeBaseImages/United-Kingdom-Southampton-his.jpg(,)http://www.sotonyouth.co.uk/images/Class/4.JPG(,)http://sotonyouth.co.uk/images/Crime/P1000292.JPG(,)http://www.culturesouthampton.org.uk/sites/www.culturesouthampton.org.uk/files/styles/cs_large/public/SCDT_Cultural_Quarter-6.jpg%3Fitok%3Dwawm3M77(,)http://onlytravellers.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Southampton-City-Guide-Including-Hotels1.jpg(,)http://www.sotonyouth.co.uk/images/About%2520Us/P1000296.JPG(,)http://beachcomberpete.com/home/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Ocean-Village-Southampton-England.jpg(,)http://www.culturesouthampton.org.uk/sites/www.culturesouthampton.org.uk/files/styles/cs_large/public/Southampton_Arts_Complex_at_night.jpg%3Fitok%3DQhBCNSJv(,)http://www.culturesouthampton.org.uk/sites/www.culturesouthampton.org.uk/files/styles/cs_large/public/gthWZ5TRdpqmehmLNBAD6nwsnhA_0.png%3Fitok%3Du3rruN1q(,)http://www.thebondsouthampton.co.uk/uploads/images/location/retail-culture.jpg(,)http://www.sotonyouth.co.uk/images/About%2520Us/P1000289.JPG(,)http://bestactivityweekends.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/palace-house-southampton.jpg(,)http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/91/Southampton_-_Maison_Tudor_02.JPG(,)http://www.discoversouthampton.co.uk/uploads/media_items/1200x430xart-gallery.0.346.4256.1522.1200.430.c.jpg.pagespeed.ic.V__mn2hNT3.jpg(,)http://www.planetware.com/photos-large/ENG/southampton.jpg(,)http://static.cruisemeet.co.uk/images/destinations/medium/northern-europe-southampton-itchen-bridge.jpg(,)http://www.planetware.com/i/map/ENG/southampton-map.jpg(,)http://www.discoversouthampton.co.uk/uploads/media_items/633x422xsouthampton-bargate.633.422.s.jpg.pagespeed.ic.yuOb-JOIQE.jpg(,)http://www.pondilla.com/data/World/UK/Southampton/Southampton_city_1.JPG(,)http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/01/1f/bf/0a/southampton.jpg(,)http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/01/17/e4/bd/southampton-common-pond.jpg(,)http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/12/04/article-2242747-16587BD0000005DC-891_634x410.jpg(,)http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/01/3a/d2/ac/fawley-chimney-best-navigation.jpg(,)http://cdn4.vtourist.com/19/4847071-Walls_Towards_The_Port_Southampton.jpg(,)http://www.discoversouthampton.co.uk/uploads/media_items/1200x430xbargate-back.429.2067.7371.2639.1200.430.c.jpg.pagespeed.ic.Z1b0QED4W3.jpg(,)http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/11/16/article-2062206-0ED27F6200000578-365_468x286.jpg(,)http://www.theukexperience.com/images/tourist-info/large/southern1.jpg


Similar Topics
South East England
Southampton, Houston
Southampton, Massachusetts
Topics