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Dalida

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Occupation(s)  Singer, actress
Website  www.dalida.com
Name   Iolanda Gigliotti
Role  Singer · dalida.com

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Birth name  Iolanda Cristina Gigliotti
Also known as  Yolanda Gigliotti and Dalida
Born  17 January 1933Cairo, Egypt (1933-01-17)
Origin  Cairo, Egypt, Serrastretta, Italy
Years active  1956–1987 (singer)1954–1986 (actress)
Died  May 3, 1987, Paris, France
Spouse  Lucien Morisse (m. 1961–1962)
Buried  Montmartre Cemetery, Paris, France
Albums  40 succes en or, Les Annees Orlando, Les 50 Plus Belles Chansons, Le reve oriental, Olympia 74

Dalida born to sing


Yolanda Cristina Gigliotti (17 January 1933 – 3 May 1987), better known as Dalida (Egyptian Arabic: داليدا‎‎), was an Egyptian-Italian then French singer and actress. She performed and recorded in ten languages, including French, Italian, Greek, Spanish, German, English, Japanese, Hebrew, Dutch and Egyptian Arabic songs mainly for her homeland. She spent most of her career in France and acquired French citizenship in 1961 upon marriage, while maintaining her original dual Egyptian-Italian. She won Miss Egypt beauty contest in 1954.

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Dalida Rabbi Barbara Dalida The Extraordinary Singer39s

Twice honoured with the Oscar mondial du succès du disque (the "World Oscar of Recording Success"), she is the only European singer to have won this award more than once. Her 30-year career began in 1956 and ended with her last album in 1986, half a year before her death, while continuing to hold concerts until her last days. Her suicide led to an iconic image as a tragic diva and renowned singer. She received more than 90 gold records and was the first singer to receive platinum and diamond discs. She has sold around 150 million albums and singles worldwide.

Dalida Dalida La chanson d39Orphe Manh de Carnaval YouTube

dalida helwa ya balady


Early life

Dalida Dalida et Franois Naudy Dalida 19331987 Pinterest

Yolanda Cristina Gigliotti was born and raised in Cairo, Egypt. Her family immigrated from Serrastretta, Calabria, Italy and settled in Shoubra of Cairo where Dalida was born. Dalida's father, Pietro Gigliotti (1904-1945), was first violinist (primo violino) at the Cairo Opera House, Dalida′s mother Giuseppina (née Rose 1906-1971) was a seamstress.

Dalida Dalida de son vrai nom italien Iolanda Cristina GIGLIOTTI

She was the middle child between two brothers, Orlando and Bruno (who would later in Dalida's career change his name to Orlando like his brother and become her manager in the 1966). Dalida's early life was spent in the district of Shoubra, where she attended the Scuola Tecnica Commerciale Maria Ausiliatrice, an Italian Catholic school.

Dalida Iolanda Cristina Gigliotti January 17 1933 May 3 1987

In 1950, Dalida participated in the Miss Ondine beauty pageant and won the title, and shortly after began working as a model for Donna, a Cairo-based fashion house. In 1954, at the age of 20, Dalida competed in and won the Miss Egypt pageant, and was crowned Miss Egypt. It was then that she was spotted by French director Marc de Gastyne and, much to the reluctance of her parents, she moved to Paris on Christmas Eve of the same year with the intention of pursuing a career in motion pictures. It was about this time she adopted a Middle-Eastern name of Dalila, which was soon changed to the more familiar Dalida.

Dalida Dalida Wikipedia

Dalida collected 19 #1 hit singles to her name in four languages (French, Italian, German, and Arabic) and has a long list of top 10, and top 20 hits in French, Italian, German, Spanish, and Arabic, and accumulated myriad top selling singles and albums largely in France, Europe, Russia, whole Arab World with Egypt mainly, Eastern and Southeastern Asia, Canada and the rest of Francophone world spanning around thirty years.

Dalida Gli Arcani Supremi Vox clamantis in deserto Gothian Iolanda

Dalida's mother tongue was Italian. She learned Egyptian Arabic and French growing up in Cairo, and improved her French after establishing herself in Paris in 1954. She later added English, plus conversational-level German and Spanish. When she became a pop and music icon in Japan, she also acquired enough basic Japanese to greet her fans in their own language. Her concerts there were met with almost unprecedented enthusiasm and once during a concert in Japan, Dalida felt ill and could not continue performing: the organisers expected an enraged reaction due to the cancellation of the concert, but when she came onstage and explained to her fans that she could not perform, she was met with great applause and her name echoed everywhere. She promised to hold the concert again, which she soon fulfilled.

1956–1975

Dalida Dalida Wikipedija

Dalida's singing career started in Egypt, when she was discovered by Cherif Kamel, host of the "Hit Parade" at the Gezira Sporting Club during the early 1950s. Dalida's quest for a career in French cinema proved to be of limited success. Instead, she began taking singing lessons, and was booked as a cabaret act on the Champs-Élysées, which proved successful. Performing the song "Étrangère au Paradis" in a variety show at Bruno Coquatrix’ recently opened Olympia theatre, Dalida was introduced to Lucien Morisse and Eddie Barclay, who played a considerable part in launching the starlet's career. Morisse was artistic producer of the popular Radio Europe 1, and Barclay an established record producer. After signing a recording contract with Barclay, Dalida's debut single "Madona" was promoted heavily by Morisse, and was a moderate success. However, the release of "Bambino" in 1956 would prove to be even more triumphant – it spent 46 weeks in the French top ten and remains one of the biggest-selling singles in French history, and for its sales (which exceeded 300,000 copies) Dalida was awarded her first gold disc, presented on 17 September 1957. The song "Bambino" echoed everywhere in France and was a success even beyond the French frontiers. In the same year, she would also support Charles Aznavour at the Olympia.

Dalida Biography in English Dalida Eternelle

The follow-up single to "Bambino", the exotic-sounding and mesmerizing "Gondolier", was released in the Christmas on 1957, was also a great success, as were other early releases such as "Come prima" ("Tu Me Donnes"), "Ciao ciao bambina", and a cover of The Drifters’ "Save the Last Dance for Me", "Garde-Moi la Dernière Danse". These classical songs mark the first phase of Dalida's album and maintain their charm even today.

Dalida Citytomb biography and picturesIolanda Cristina Gigliotti Dalida

Dalida toured extensively from 1958 through the early 1960s, playing dates in France, Egypt, Italy, and the United States. Her tours of Egypt and Italy spread her fame outside France and Dalida soon became well known throughout Europe. However, she waited too long before entering America's music scene, and though great names of the American music industry wanted to introduce her to the United States, she refused.

In 1961, Dalida performed a month of shows at the Olympia in Paris, with each selling out completely. Shortly afterwards Dalida embarked upon a tour of Hong Kong and Vietnam. Throughout the 1960s Dalida would frequently perform sell-out shows at the Olympia, and international dates became more frequent. In December 1968, she was awarded the Médaille de la Présidence de la République by General Charles de Gaulle, the only person from the music industry to have received this medal.

The early 1970s became a transitional period for the singer, highlighted by some of her most successful singles. After gaining a keen interest in academia in the mid-1960s she chose to sing songs with more profound lyrics. She tried to probe into her inner-self and declared that she would sing only those songs which have a meaning for her. Bruno Coquatrix was dubious about Dalida's career evolution, and was hesitant to book her for a series of performances in 1971. Dalida hired the hall herself, and her show was met with an impressive public response. In 1973, a French version of the Italian song "Parole Parole", originally performed by Mina, was recorded by Dalida and her friend Alain Delon. The song became a major hit and was the number one single in France and Japan. It was played consistently on French radio, at the request of listeners. The 1974 follow-up, "Gigi L'amoroso" and B-side "Il venait d'avoir 18 ans", reached number one in nine countries and sold three and a half million copies in Europe. Touring would follow this period of unprecedented sales. In February 1975, French music critics presented the singer with the prestigious Prix de l'Académie du Disque Français.

1976–1987

In 1976, Dalida re-recorded what is widely regarded as the first French disco single, "J'attendrai". Around the same time, the popularity of the variety show in France was soaring, and Dalida made many television appearances in France and across Europe during this period. In 1976, she recorded "Salma Ya Salama", based on a traditional Egyptian folk song which, due to its success, was translated from Arabic into French, Italian, and German. It was amongst the first Ethnic fusion hits in the world. Part of the lyrics are based on an old Egyptian folk song about homesickness and celebrating the Egyptian nation. As was the Hebrew song "Hene Ma Tov" sung word-perfect.

She played outside France, including Carnegie Hall in New York City, where she appeared in November 1978. This performance marked her American début. In a The New York Times review of the Carnegie Hall concert, Dalida's performance was noted for its intimacy and intensity after she began to converse midway through it, revealing her personality.

In 1980 she released "Rio do Brasil", and in 1981 held her last concert at The Olympia in Paris, emulating her successful 1980 tour. Several dates were played, although the following year The Olympia went bankrupt. On the night of her inagural performance there she became the first singer to be awarded with a diamond disc, in recognition of her record sales which, at that point in her career, had exceeded 86 million. She was therefore much ahead of American singer Madonna since she was the first person to receive this success, thus paving the way for women to deliver powerful performances. Dalida spent much of 1982 and 1984 on tour, releasing the album Les P'tits Mots in 1983, which featured hit singles "Lucas" and "Mourir Sur Scène". The album Dali was released in 1984, and was accompanied by the release of several singles, including "Soleil", "Pour te dire je t'aime", a cover of Stevie Wonder's "I Just Called to Say I Love You", and "Kalimba de Luna", originally recorded by Tony Esposito. All three achieved moderate chart success, and her next 1986 album, Le visage de l'amour, would become her last album of completely new recordings (except for its final song, "Mourir sur scène").

Other hit performances of Dalida include "The Lambeth Walk"; both in English and in French. The song "Je suis malade", written by Serge Lama and made into a success by Dalida, reflects the singer's personal torments and unhappiness. The emotions with which she sang the song is unmatched even today. At the peak of her success, an obsessed fan tried to kidnap her in Canada by using a hammer but did not succeed.

Undaunted, she continued to deliver hit records such as "Laissez-moi danser", "Besame Mucho", "A ma manière", a cover version of Édith Piaf's "La vie en rose", "Born to sing"/"Mourir sur scène", and others.

On 1984 Dalida underwent two major eye operations in 1985, and she put her career on hiatus as the stage lights started to trouble her. In 1986, she would play the role of a young grandmother in the Youssef Chahine film Le Sixième Jour, for which she received favourable critical response. Her last live performance took place in Antalya, Turkey, in 1987.

Personal life

While Dalida was professionally very successful, her private life was marred by a series of failed relationships and personal problems.

In January 1967, she took part in the Sanremo Festival with her new lover, Italian singer, songwriter, and actor Luigi Tenco. The song he presented was "Ciao amore ciao" ("Bye Love, Bye"), which he sang together with Dalida. But stressed, Tenco failed despite Dalida's performance. Tenco committed suicide on 27 January 1967, after learning that his song had been eliminated from the final competition. Tenco was found by Dalida in his hotel room with a bullet wound in his left temple and a note announcing that his gesture was against the jury and public's choices during the competition. Prior to Tenco's suicide, Dalida and he had become engaged. One month later, Dalida attempted to commit suicide by drug overdose at the Prince of Wales Hotel in Paris. She spent five days in a coma and several months convalescing. Dalida returned to the stage the following October.

In December 1967, just after her first suicide attempt, she became pregnant by a 22-year-old Italian student, Lucio. Her decision to have an abortion left her infertile.

In September 1970, her former husband (1956-1961) Lucien Morisse, with whom she was on good terms, committed suicide, shooting himself in the head.

In April 1975, her close friend singer Mike Brant leapt to his death from an apartment in Paris. He was 28. Dalida had contributed to his success in France when he opened for her in 1971 at l'Olympia.

In July 1983, her lover from 1972 to 1981, Richard Chanfray, committed suicide by inhaling the exhaust gas of his Renault 25 car.

Death

On the night of 2 May to 3, 1987, Dalida committed suicide by overdosing on barbiturates. She left behind a note which read, "La vie m'est insupportable... Pardonnez-moi." ("Life is unbearable for me... Forgive me.")

Dalida is buried at the Montmartre Cemetery, 18th Division, Chemin des Gardes.

Legacy

Since her death, Dalida has become a cult figure to a new generation of fans. In 1988, the Encyclopædia Universalis commissioned a poll, which was published in the French newspaper Le Monde, which aimed to reveal the personalities who had the greatest impact on French society. Dalida polled second, behind Général de Gaulle.

She is also a gay icon in France.

In 1997, the corner of the rue Girardon and rue de l'Abreuvoir in Montmartre, Paris, was inaugurated as Place Dalida and a large bust in her memory was erected. In 1999, a 3-CD box-set compiling her greatest hits was released. In 2000, Dalida's longtime friend Charles Aznavour recorded the hit "De la scène à la Seine", a joyful song of her life in France, and in 2002, the French government honoured her memory with a postage stamp done in commemoration of the 15th anniversary of her death. In the same year, Universal Music Group released her early album releases in special-edition packaging, with all of the tracks digitally remastered. Her output has also been the subject of various remix albums. Since her death, many of Dalida's hits have been remixed to modern techno and dance beats, topping the charts in various countries to this day.

From 11 May to September 2007, the Paris City Hall commemorated the 20th anniversary of Dalida's death with an exhibition of her outfits and previously unreleased photographs.

Stage and film adaptations of Dalida's life

In 1999 the play Solitudini – Luigi Tenco e Dalida, written and directed by Maurizio Valtieri, was performed in Rome.

In 2005, her life was documented in the two-part TV film Dalida, in the role of Dalida was Sabrina Ferilli.

In 2017, Lisa Azuelos, daughter of famous French singer, Marie Laforêt, directed the film Dalida, starring Riccardo Scamarcio, Vincent Perez, Niels Schneider, Jean-Paul Rouve, Patrick Timsit and Sveva Alviti who portrayed Dalida.

Discography

  • See main article List of Dalida songs for a complete international listing of all Dalida's songs.
  • See main article Dalida albums discography for Dalida's albums discography.
  • See main article Dalida singles discography for Dalida's singles discography.
  • Filmography

    This is a chronologically ordered list of films in which Dalida appeared.

    Commander of the National Order of the Legion of Honour of the French Republic.

    Commander of the Order of the Crown of Belgium.

    Companion of the Order of Canada.

    Commander of the Order of the Nile of Egypt.

    Commander of the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic.

    Bronze medal of the National defense of the French Republic.

    Commandeur of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres of the French Republic.

    Honours

  • 1950: Dalida won the title of Miss Ondine.
  • 1954: Dalida won the Miss Egypt beauty pageant and crowned Miss Egypt 1954.
  • 1968: Godmother of Montmartre street urchins.
  • 1968: French Ordre des Arts et des Lettres.
  • 1977: Egyptian Order of the Nile.
  • 1984: Dalida declined the French honour Légion d'honneur award, the highest order of France, marking the first time she ever declined an honour.
  • Medals
  • 1968: Medal of the City of Paris.
  • 1968: the French President's Medal (Médaille de la Présidence de la République) awarded by President of the French Republic Général de Gaulle on 5 December 1968, representing the only time in history an artist has ever been presented with this honour by the President of France to date.
  • 1968: Ruby Cross (Croix de Vermeil) (Commander of Arts, Sciences and Letters).
  • 1981: Dalida was awarded a medal of the National defense by then French Minister of Defence Charles Hernu.
  • Non French Egyptian honours
  • 1962: Calabrian Citizen of Honour.
  • 1969: Italian Order of Merit.
  • 1980: City of Graulhet Medal of Honour.
  • 1984: Belgian Order of the Crown.
  • 1985: Canadian medal for talent and wisdom.
  • Posthumous tributes

  • 1987: Dalida was posthumously honoured with a commemorative coin minted by The French Mint, Monnaie de Paris, issued in gold, bronze and silver, bearing her effigy.
  • 1988: Dalida was posthumously honoured by the "International Star Registry" (US), with the issuance of a diploma, awarded three years after her death.
  • 1997: Dalida was posthumously honoured by the City of Paris with a square named in her memory, named "Place Dalida", located at the angle of rues Girardon and Abreuvoirs, in the 18th arrondissement (borough) of Paris, France.
  • 1997: Dalida became one of only three women in France to have a statue erected to her, along with Joan of Arc and Sarah Bernhardt.
  • 1998: Dalida was posthumously honoured in Egypt in a tribute ceremony on 27 October in Cairo and the "Dalida Prize" was awarded in her honour.
  • 2001: Dalida was posthumously honoured by the French government with a second stamp bearing her likeness which was released by La Poste, the French postal service, as part of the Song Artists series. 10,157,601 copies were sold.
  • 2003: Awarded prize for "Greatest Singer of the Century" in France, based on three criteria: numbers of album and single sales, number of radio airplays and chart positions. Dalida was placed third after Madonna and Céline Dion. In 2003 Dalida remained the number one favourite artist in France.
  • Polls

  • 1965 – F.O.P. Poll: 'Favourite French singer'
  • 1976 – Dalida was voted 'Woman of the Year' in Canada, ahead of Jackie Kennedy)
  • 1982 – Paris Match magazine survey revealed that Dalida was the only representative from show business to appear in a list of most influential French women.
  • 1985 – Dalida was voted 'Favourite French singer' (Télé 7 Jours magazine).
  • 1986 – VSD magazine published a survey in which Dalida was voted 'Favourite French singer'.
  • 1988 – SOFRES/Encyclopædia Universalis: In a survey asking the French public which events had the greatest impact on the French public between 1968 and 1988, 16% of the French public voted the 'Death of Général de Gaulle' and 10% voted the 'Death of Dalida'.
  • 1989 – Encyclopædia Universalis: By examining the proof by the criteria to find out which person had biggest impact on French society, it was concluded that Dalida is the second, just after president de Gaulle.
  • 2001 – IFOP Survey: Dalida was voted the 'Most important female singer who had the greatest impact on French society in the 20th century', along with Édith Piaf.
  • 2005 – Dalida was voted the 'Favourite singer in 2004' amongst Italians, and held seventh place amongst the most collected musical artists in Italy.
  • 2005 – Dalida was voted 'Top 58th French person of all time' in a survey sponsored by the France 2 television channel. The only women from show business which appeared in this list were Catherine Deneuve, Brigitte Bardot, Simone Signoret, Édith Piaf and Dalida.
  • Honorific eponyms

    Geographic locations
  •  France: Place Dalida, Montmartre, Paris
  •  Canada: rue Dalida, Laval, Que., Canada
  • Art (selection)

  • Jean Sobieski: Dalida (Oil on canvas, 19??)
  • Magguy Crouzet: Dalida (Portrait in dot-sculpture, 1976)
  • Michel Souvais: Dalida, femme est la nuit (Oil on canvas, 1977)
  • Alain Aslan: Dalida (Yolanda Gigliotti), funerary statue (Bronze sculpture, 1987)
  • Alain Aslan: Dalida (Yolanda Gigliotti) (Bronze bust, 1997)
  • Francesco Gallo: Dalida (Yolanda Gigliotti) (Bronze sculpture, 2007)
  • FS62: Dalida (Black and white portrait in acrylic, 2008)
  • Dalida in contemporary music

  • The Dalida song "Born to Sing" (original French title "Mourir sur scène" and later translated to English, Italian, Turkish and Spanish) was covered in English by Dalida's long time friend Shirley Bassey, released in 1986 as a B-side of a Towerbell Records single (A-side: "There's No Place Like London"). Although the recording has never been re-released, Shirley Bassey performed the song in 1995 during some concerts as part of her 40th anniversary world tour. Shirley Bassey's interpretation of "Born to Sing" is also sometimes titled or referred to as "I Was Born to Sing Forever." In 1985, Turkish superstar Ajda Pekkan recorded the song with the title Bir Gece Sahnesi, with very similar lyrics.
  • In 1996, Céline Dion and Alain Delon performed the song "Paroles, paroles" on the 1996 New Year's Eve France 2 television programme.
  • In 1998, Sarah Brightman's released the song "There for Me", an English-language version of "Fini, la comédie". The song first appeared on her Time to Say Goodbye album, featuring José Cura. It was also released as a single, with "O mio babbino caro" as the B-side track. Often on her 2000/2001 La Luna tour, Brightman would perform this duet with Josh Groban, and this was included in the La Luna: Live in Concert DVD.
  • The song "De la scène à la Seine", by Charles Aznavour, from his year 2000 album Aznavour, 2000 is a tribute to Dalida.
  • In 2000, Sarah Hohn (featuring Wehrlen), released a cover of the song "Paroles, paroles" in tribute to Dalida and Alain Delon.
  • In 2002, an interpretation of the song "Pour ne pas vivre seul", by Firmine Richard, was included in the movie 8 femmes, by François Ozon.
  • In 2004, the song "Laissez-moi danser (Monday Tuesday)" was covered by Star Academy 4 in France, under the shorter name "Laissez-moi danser", in honour of Dalida.
  • In 2005, Lebanese singer Grace Deeb released a cover of the song "Helwa ya baladi", which reached number one spots over the chart.
  • In 2007, Spanish singer Luz Casal released the song "18 años", a new Spanish-language interpretation of "Tenía 18 años", the Spanish version of "Il venait d'avoir 18 ans" (English version: "He Must Have Been Eighteen"), in honour of French music, with entirely new Spanish lyrics, on her album "Vida tóxica".
  • In 2007, Italian singer Patty Pravo released the tribute album Spero che ti piaccia... Pour toi, in tribute to Dalida.
  • In 2007, Lebanese singer Elissa (Arabic: إليسا) paid hommage to the chanteuse, covering her famous song, "Helwa ya baladi".
  • In 2007, Italian singer-songwriter Franco Battiato released the album Fleurs 2, containing the track "Il venait d'avoir 18 ans", a cover in hommage to the singer, performed with the participation of Persian vocalist Sepideh Raissadat (Persian: سپیده رئیس سادات).
  • In 2008, French singer Michèle Torr covered the song "Pour ne pas vivre seul", released on her album Ces années-là, in hommage to Dalida. A live version of her rendition was also released on her live DVD Olympia 2008, and digital album of the same name, both released in 2009.
  • In 2009, Lara Fabian released the tribute album Toutes les femmes en moi, containing an interpretation of the song "Il venait d'avoir 18 ans", of which the former is in part tribute, and the latter in tribute to Dalida.
  • In 2009, Arthanor Music released the tribute album Un clip de toi (Hommage à Dalida, 1988), containing four tracks originally recorded in 1988 by David Heissen and dedicated to Dalida.
  • In 2012, French singer Amel Bent rendered hommage to Dalida by performing two of Dalida's signature songs "À Ma Manière" and "Mourir Sur Scène" on France 3's television programme Chabada.
  • In 2012, the double album Depuis qu’elle est partie containing a hommage CD titled Ils chantent Dalida featuring covers of several of Dalida's songs, performed by French singers Amel Bent, Christophe Willem, Hélène Segara, Patrick Fiori, Lara Fabian, Christophe (singer), Dany Brillant, and others, was released in the month of April.
  • 2013 Gigi L'amoroso stranded number 98 in the Belgium top 1000 listeners choice
  • Music from motion pictures and TV

    The following Dalida songs have appeared in the formentioned motion pictures or TV series.

    Theatrical productions

    Several theatrical productions have been made about Dalida's life. In 1999, "Solitudini – Luigi Tenco e Dalida", written and directed by Maurizio Valtieri, was performed in Rome. "Dalida: Une Vie", directed by René Simard and under the authorisation of Orlando Productions, was performed from October 2003 to June 2006, in Quebec, Canada, and was shown in Beirut, Lebanon in May 2004. In 2005, the play "Dalida, à quoi bon vivre au mois de mai ?", written by Joseph Agostini and Caroline Sourrisseau, was performed at the Ateliers Théâtre in Montmartre.

    Biographies

  • Dalida, by Michel Delain, Éditions de l'Heure, 1962. (in French)
  • Dalida, La gloire et les larmes, by Pascal Sevran, 1976. (in French)
  • 25 ans de triomphe, by Christian Page, Delmas Éditeur, 1981. (in French)
  • Dalida, by Christian Page, Têtes D'affiche, 1982. (in French)
  • Dalida, mon amour, by Anne Gallimard and Orlando, Édition NRJ, 1984. ISBN 978-2-908070-01-9. (in French)
  • Lorsque l’amour s’en va, by Catherine Benoît Sévin, Michel Lafon, 1987; Carrere, 1989. ISBN 978-2-908070-01-9. (in French)
  • Dalida, mon amour, by Anne Gallimard and Orlando, Édition NRJ, 1989. ISBN 978-2-908070-01-9. (in French)
  • Dalida mon amour, by Orlando, Hachette Littérature, 1991. ISBN 978-2-7382-0362-5. (in French)
  • Dalida, Histoire d’une femme, by Jean-François Josselin and Jeff Barnel, Jean-Claude Lattès, 1994. ISBN 978-2-7096-1450-4. (in French)
  • Les larmes de la gloire, by Bernard Pascuito, Éditions Michel Lafon, 1997. ISBN 978-2-84098-301-9. (in French)
  • Dalida, by C. Daccache, Éditions Vade Retro, 1998. ISBN 2-909828-51-4 and ISBN 978-2-909828-51-0. (in French)
  • Dalida: Mon frère, tu écriras mes mémoires, by Catherine Rihoit, Plon, 1998. (in French)
  • Dalida, by Catherine Rihoit, Omnibus, 1998. ISBN 978-2-259-00083-3. (in French)
  • Star pour toujours, by Julie Thamin, Gep, 2000. (in French)
  • Dalida: Entre violon et amour, by Isaline, Éditions Publibook, 2002. ISBN 978-2-7483-2629-1. (in French)
  • Du Nil à la scène, Jacques Brachet, Éditions Va bene and Éditions de la courtine, 2001, 2002. ISBN 2-913483-36-4. (in French)
  • Dalida: Une oeuvre en soi, by Michel Rheault, Nota Bene, 2002. ISBN 2-89518-111-X. (in French)
  • Luigi Tenco. Vita breve e morte di un genio musicale, by Aldo Fegatelli Colonna, A. Mondadori, 2002. ISBN 88-04-50087-5 and ISBN 978-88-04-50087-2. (in Italian)
  • Ciao, ciao bambina, by Henri-Jean Servat and Orlando, Éditions Albin Michel, 2003. ISBN 978-2-226-14298-6. (in French)
  • Dalida, by Catherine Rihoit, Plon, re-published 2004. ISBN 978-2-259-20180-3. (in French)
  • D’une rive à l’autre, by David Lelait, Payot, 2004. ISBN 978-2-228-89904-8. (in French)
  • L’argus Dalida: Discographie mondiale et cotations, by Daniel Lesueur, Éditions Alternatives, 2004. ISBN 978-2-86227-428-7. (in French)
  • La véritable Dalida, by Emmanuel Bonini, Éditions Pygmalion, 2004. ISBN 2-85704-902-1 and ISBN 978-2-85704-902-9. (in French)
  • Mademoiselle succès, Barclay France, 2004. UPC 602498110843. (in French)
  • Dalida: La femme de cœur, by Jeff Barnel, Éditions du Rocher, 2005. ISBN 978-2-268-05500-8. (in French)
  • Dalida: La voce e l'anima, by Giandomenico Curi, 2005. ISBN 978-88-7641-687-3. (in Italian)
  • Top Dalida, Éditions Paul Beuscher, 2005. ASIN B000ZG64FO. (in French)
  • Dalida: La voce, Il suono, L'anima, by Mino Rossi, Edizioni Franciacorta, 2005. ISBN 978-88-89364-01-7. (in Italian)
  • Quasi sera: una storia di Tenco, by A. Montellanico, StampaAlternativa/NuoviEquilibri, 2005. ISBN 88-7226-910-5. (in Italian)
  • D’une rive à l’autre, by David Lelait-Helo, Éditions J'ai Lu, 2006. ISBN 978-2-290-34567-2. (in French)
  • Ntaainta Dalida, Éditions Odos Panos and 20 ans sans elle, 2006. (in French)
  • Dalida passionnément, by Arianne Ravier, Éditions Favre, 2006. ISBN 978-2-8289-0927-7. (in French)
  • Dalida, by Henry-Jean Servat and Orlando, Éditions Albin Michel, 2007. ISBN 978-2-226-15218-3. (in French)
  • Dalida, tu m'appelais petite sœur…, by Jacqueline Pitchal, Éditions Carpentier Didier, 2007. ISBN 978-2-84167-504-3. (in French)
  • Dalida: Une vie brûlée, by Bernard Pascuito, L'Archipel, 2007. ISBN 978-2-84167-504-3. (in French)
  • Dalida: Une vie..., by Jacques Pessis, Célina Jauregui, Emmanuel Polle and N-T Binh, Édition Chronique, 2007. 978-2-205-06006-5. (in French)
  • Dalida: Le temps d'aimer, Fabien Lecœuvre, Éditions City Editions, 2007. ISBN 978-2-35288-046-2. (in French)
  • Luigi Tenco: Ed ora avrei mille cose da fare, by R. Tortarolo and G. Carozzi, Arcana, 2007. ISBN 978-88-7966-431-8. (in Italian)
  • Dalida: Ses fans, ses amis ont la parole, by Claire Nérac and Cédric Naïmi, Éditions du Rocher, 2008. ISBN 978-2-268-06580-9. (in French)
  • Mia zia, ma tante Dalida, by Stéphane Julienne and Luigi Gigliotti, Éditions Ramsay, 2009. ISBN 978-2-8122-0011-3. (in French)
  • Dalida, le profil perdu, by Jean-Manuel Gabert, Éditions de la Belle Gabrielle, La légende de Montmartre collection, 2009. ISBN 978-2-917269-02-2. (in French)
  • Pour Dalida, by Colette Fellous, Flammarion ed., 2010. ISBN 978-2-08-069056-2. (in French)
  • Les grands interprètes, by Jacques Perciot, Frédéric Brun, Olympia Alberti, et Claude Frigara, Éditions Christian Pirot, 2010. ISBN 978-2-86808-274-9. (in French)
  • Rencontres avec une Étoile, by Jean-Claude Genel, Éditions Entre deux mondes, 2010. ISBN 978-2-919537-00-6. (in French)
  • La nuit de San Remo, by Philippe Brunel, Éditions Grasset, 2012. ISBN 978-2-246-75321-6. (in French)
  • Ciao amore. Tenco e Dalida, la notte di Sanremo, by Philippe Brunel, transl. by G. Vulpius, Rizzoli ed., 2012. ISBN 978-88-17-05518-5. (in Italian)
  • C'était en mai, un samedi, by David Lelait-Helo, Éditions Anne Carrière, 2012. ISBN 978-2-84337-663-4. (in French)
  • Internet websites: Hit-Parade France, Hit Parade Italia, Infodisc, Official Montmartre Tourist Information Authority, Dalida Official Website.
  • References

    Dalida Wikipedia


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