Girish Mahajan (Editor)

Milltown, New Jersey

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Country  United States
County  Middlesex
Time zone  Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Elevation  11 m
Population  6,996 (2013)
Area code  732
State  New Jersey
Incorporated  January 29, 1889
Area  4.134 km²
Zip code  08850
Local time  Wednesday 5:28 PM
Milltown, New Jersey
Area rank  443rd of 566 in state 22nd of 25 in county
Weather  1°C, Wind NW at 31 km/h, 25% Humidity

Milltown is a borough in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 6,893, reflecting a decrease of 107 (-1.5%) from the 7,000 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 32 (+0.5%) from the 6,968 counted in the 1990 Census.

Contents

Map of Milltown, NJ, USA

Milltown was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on January 29, 1889, from portions of North Brunswick Township, based on the results of a referendum held three days earlier. The borough was reincorporated by resolution of the borough council on May 2, 1896. A portion of East Brunswick Township was annexed in 1902. Originally known as Bergen's Mill, named for Jacob I. Bergen who owned the grist mill, the name is believed to have become "Milltown" from residents "going to the mill in town".

As of the 2000 Census, the center of population for New Jersey was located in Milltown, at Milltown Road, just east of the New Jersey Turnpike (see map of location).

The groundbreaking anxiolytic and sedative drug Miltown (meprobamate), which became available to the public in the mid-1950s, was named for the borough.

History

Long before the arrival of the first Europeans, the Lenape had established settlements along the Lawrence Brook. The discovery of many artifacts in the area above today's municipal building (now a small county park) suggests the presence of a Native American settlement. In 1678, Thomas Lawrence, a New York baker, acquired a large area around the Lawrence Brook, which likely included today's Milltown. The Lawrence Brook was then called Piscopeek (and on later maps, Lawrence's Brook). The names and marks of several Native Americans (Quemareck, Quesiacs, Isarick, Metapis, Peckawan and Turantaca) appear on the bill of sale. In 1769, Fulcard Van Nordstrand advertised the sale of a large gristmill on the bank of Lawrence Brook. It would soon be called Lawrence Brook Mill. The 1903 classic western film The Great Train Robbery was shot in Milltown.

In March 2010, the Milltown City Council voted against changing the name of Petain Avenue, citing the difficulties that the street's residents would endure if the name changed. Petain Avenue is named for Philippe Pétain, a French World War I general who became the leader of the Vichy France government during World War II. The Vichy Regime willfully collaborated with Nazi Germany, taking state action against "undesirables", including Jews, Protestants, gays, gypsies, and left-wing activists. In total, the Vichy government participated in the deportation of 76,000 Jews to German extermination camps, although this number varies depending on the account; only 2,500 survived the war. After the war, Petain was charged with perjury and sentenced to death, though this was commuted to life imprisonment due to his advanced age. France has since changed the name of every street formerly known as Petain.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, Milltown borough had a total area of 1.596 square miles (4.134 km2), including 1.551 square miles (4.018 km2) of land and 0.045 square mile (0.116 km2) of water (2.80%).

The borough borders North Brunswick Township to the west and East Brunswick Township to the east. The Lawrence Brook, a tributary of the Raritan River, flows through the borough after exiting the Farrington Lake. The dam, under Main Street, creates a reservoir, the Mill Pond.

Climate

The climate in the area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Milltown has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.

2010 Census

The 2010 United States Census counted 6,893 people, 2,599 households, and 1,915 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,443.0 per square mile (1,715.5/km2). The borough contained 2,698 housing units at an average density of 1,739.0 per square mile (671.4/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 92.44% (6,372) White, 1.23% (85) Black or African American, 0.13% (9) Native American, 3.37% (232) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 1.58% (109) from other races, and 1.25% (86) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 6.46% (445) of the population.

Out of a total of 2,599 households, 31.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.9% were married couples living together, 9.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.3% were non-families. 20.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the borough, 21.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 26.0% from 25 to 44, 30.1% from 45 to 64, and 14.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.6 years. For every 100 females the census counted 97.1 males, but for 100 females at least 18 years old, it was 93.5 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $89,457 (with a margin of error of +/- $14,398) and the median family income was $103,750 (+/- $7,631). Males had a median income of $63,377 (+/- $5,321) versus $41,029 (+/- $3,358) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $33,472 (+/- $2,034). About 2.9% of families and 3.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.9% of those under age 18 and 5.3% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 7,000 people, 2,627 households, and 1,943 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,452.0 people per square mile (1,721.5/km2). There were 2,670 housing units at an average density of 1,698.1 per square mile (656.6/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.86% White, 0.76% African American, 0.16% Native American, 3.07% Asian, 1.16% from other races, and 1.00% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.73% of the population.

There were 2,627 households out of which 31.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.9% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.0% were non-families. 21.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the borough the population was spread out with 22.9% under the age of 18, 6.8% from 18 to 24, 29.5% from 25 to 44, 25.1% from 45 to 64, and 15.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 93.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.2 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $68,429, and the median income for a family was $77,869. Males had a median income of $50,338 versus $38,220 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $29,996. About 1.3% of families and 2.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.3% of those under age 18 and 1.3% of those age 65 or over.

Local government

Milltown is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle. The Borough form of government used by Maywood, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.

As of 2016, the Mayor of Milltown is Democrat Eric A. Steeber, whose term of office ends December 31, 2019. Members of the Milltown Borough Council are Council President Ron Dixon (R, 2017), Randy Farkas (D, 2018), Jerry Guthlein (R, 2017), Francis Guyette (R, 2016), Doriann Kerber (R, 2016) and Nicholas Ligotti (D, 2018).

In the November 2011 General Election, Democrat Eric Steeber was elected to a four-year term as mayor, the borough's first Democrat to serve in the position for 25 years, while his running mates Randy Farkas and Joseph Pietanza won three-year terms on the Borough Council.

Federal, state and county representation

Milltown is located in the 12th Congressional District and is part of New Jersey's 17th state legislative district.

New Jersey's Twelfth Congressional District is represented by Bonnie Watson Coleman (D, Ewing Township). New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021) and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).

For the 2016–2017 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 17th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Bob Smith (D, Piscataway) and in the General Assembly by Joseph Danielsen (D, Franklin Township) and Joseph V. Egan (D, New Brunswick) The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township). The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).

Middlesex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members are elected at-large on a partisan basis to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in January, the board selects from among its members a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director. As of 2015, Middlesex County's Freeholders (with party affiliation, term-end year, residence and committee chairmanship listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Ronald G. Rios (D, term ends December 31, 2015, Carteret; Ex-officio on all committees), Freeholder Deputy Director Carol Barrett Bellante (D, 2017; Monmouth Junction, South Brunswick Township; County Administration), Kenneth Armwood (D, 2016, Piscataway; Business Development and Education), Charles Kenny ( D, 2016, Woodbridge Township; Finance), H. James Polos (D, 2015, Highland Park; Public Safety and Health), Charles E. Tomaro (D, 2017, Edison; Infrastructure Management) and Blanquita B. Valenti (D, 2016, New Brunswick; Community Services). Constitutional officers are County Clerk Elaine M. Flynn (D, Old Bridge Township), Sheriff Mildred S. Scott (D, 2016, Piscataway) and Surrogate Kevin J. Hoagland (D, 2017; New Brunswick).

Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 5,075 registered voters in Milltown, of which 1,609 (31.7%) were registered as Democrats, 823 (16.2%) were registered as Republicans and 2,643 (52.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 49.9% of the vote (1,828 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 48.7% (1,784 votes), and other candidates with 1.4% (53 votes), among the 3,706 ballots cast by the borough's 5,159 registered voters (41 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 71.8%. In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 52.0% of the vote (2,112 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 45.5% (1,848 votes) and other candidates with 1.6% (65 votes), among the 4,058 ballots cast by the borough's 5,250 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.3%. In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 55.5% of the vote (2,181 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 42.9% (1,683 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (44 votes), among the 3,927 ballots cast by the borough's 5,064 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 77.5.

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 64.6% of the vote (1,650 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 33.5% (855 votes), and other candidates with 2.0% (51 votes), among the 2,586 ballots cast by the borough's 5,180 registered voters (30 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 49.9%. In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 55.9% of the vote (1,684 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 32.6% (982 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.7% (261 votes) and other candidates with 1.6% (47 votes), among the 3,011 ballots cast by the borough's 5,096 registered voters, yielding a 59.1% turnout.

Education

The Milltown Public Schools serves students in public school for pre-kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its two schools had an enrollment of 996 students and 56.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 17.7:1. Schools in the district (with 2014-15 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are Parkview School (grades PreK-3; 314 students) and Joyce Kilmer School (grades 4-8; 370 students).

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend Spotswood High School in Spotswood as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Spotswood Public Schools, which also serves students from Helmetta. In 2013, Milltown and Spotswood had discussions of expanding the partnership between the two districts beyond the sending relationship. As of the 2014-15 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 735 students and 66.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.1:1.

Our Lady of Lourdes School (PreK-8) operates under the supervision of Roman Catholic Diocese of Metuchen.

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 27.37 miles (44.05 km) of roadways, of which 23.74 miles (38.21 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.59 miles (4.17 km) by Middlesex County and 1.04 miles (1.67 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

County Route 617 (Ryders Lane) is a major artery serving the borough along the eastern border. The New Jersey Turnpike passes through for about a mile, but the closest interchange is in neighboring East Brunswick Township. Also, U.S. 1 is outside in neighboring North Brunswick.

Public transportation

On weekdays, NJ Transit provides local bus service on the 811 route, and Coach USA Suburban Transit provides NYC rush-hour commuter service on the 400 route.

The Raritan River Railroad ran through Milltown, but is now defunct along this part of the line. The track and freight station still remain.

Notable people

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Milltown include:

  • J. Edward Crabiel (1916-1992), politician who served in the New Jersey Senate and as New Jersey Secretary of State, until forced to resign.
  • Al Hermann (1899-1980), baseball player who played for the Boston Braves.
  • David Kikoski (born 1961), jazz pianist.
  • Danny Pintauro (born 1976), actor who got started as a child actor on the television soap opera As the World Turns, and in the movie Cujo, and came to prominence on the television series Who's the Boss?.
  • Peter Plantec (born 1943), writer, digital artist and software designer.
  • David Schwendeman (1924–2012), last full-time chief taxidermist of the American Museum of Natural History from 1959 to 1988, who was a lifelong resident of Milltown.
  • References

    Milltown, New Jersey Wikipedia


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