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Winslow Township, New Jersey

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Country  United States
County  Camden
Named for  Edward Winslow Coffin
Zip code  08095
Local time  Tuesday 9:08 AM
State  New Jersey
Incorporated  November 26, 1867
Area  150.7 km²
Population  34,611 (2000)

Area rank  24th of 566 in state 1st of 37 in county
Weather  16°C, Wind SW at 11 km/h, 93% Humidity

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Winslow Township is a township in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 39,499, reflecting an increase of 4,888 (+14.1%) from the 34,611 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 4,524 (+15.0%) from the 30,087 counted in the 1990 Census.

Contents

Map of Winslow Township, NJ, USA

Winslow Township was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 8, 1845, from portions of Gloucester Township. Portions of the township were taken on November 26, 1867, to create Chesilhurst. In 1950, the township annexed a portion of Monroe Township (in Gloucester County).

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History

Winslow Township is Camden County's largest municipality at 58 square miles (150 km2). The township got its name from the son of a 19th-century glass factory owner, William Coffin Sr., who bought large tracts of timber in Camden County about six miles west of Hammonton and with his son-in-law in 1929. Thomas Jefferson Perce and William Coffin Jr., built the Winslow Glass Works (his second one in 12 years) in the midst of a thick pine forest. The community was named for Senior Coffin's youngest son, Edward Winslow Coffin.

Winslow Township was incorporated in 1845 from the Township of Gloucester. The township's very first meeting was held at Josiah Albertson's Blue Anchor Inn which was located on what is now Route 73 in the vicinity of St Lucy's Church. During its early years Winslow was known for its thriving glass business which developed as a result of the townships abundant resources of timber, clay, and sand, though by the start of the 20th century the glass industry died throughout Winslow. During the early 20th century, Winslow's population continued to grow until it peaked at a small 11,000 residents by the 1970s. During this time period the majority of Winslow residents were farmers. In 1965, Winslow township started to see an increase in population as the Atlantic City Expressway was completed with an interchange in Winslow at Williamstown Road. The proximity of the interchange drew developers towards the Sicklerville section of the township, where Levitt & Sons would build thousands of homes throughout the 1970s. Between 1970 and 1980 Winslow's population nearly doubled to 20,000 residents.

As of 2006, 80% of the township currently sits in the Pinelands National Reserve, thus restricting future land development. Despite the restriction of development on the reserve, agricultural areas still persist in Winslow.

The township is also served by two area codes, 856 and 609. When area code 609 was split in 1999, the southern/eastern end in the township (primarily with the Hammonton mailing address, Cedar Brook, and a small section of Sickerville) were left in the 609 code, while the other sections closer to Berlin and Williamstown received 856 as their area code.

Landmarks
  • St Lucy's Roman Catholic Church, Route 73. It became a parish in 1961. The Rev. Edward McDaid is pastor.
  • Bates Mills Cemetery is a cemetery located on South Erhke Road in Blue Anchor, New Jersey. Today passersby can observe a number of very old grave stones with hardly visible faded initials engraved upon them. The stones seem to be made from iron ore.
  • Pinelands National Reserve
  • Levitt and Sons Incorporated build Winslow crossing in the 1970s in Sicklerville. The complexes that were built at this time were Primrose Gate, Manor Hall, Victoria Manor, Eden Hollow, Lehigh Manor, Arbor Meadows and Ivy Meadows.
  • In 1972, the Lutheran affiliated Winslow Community Church opens in the Cedarbrook Hunting and Fishing Club.
  • Historical timeline
  • 1845: Winslow is incorporated from Gloucester Township.
  • 1920: Albion School is built.
  • 1923: Sicklerville School is built.
  • 1925: St. Lucys Roman Catholic Church begins in the Blue Anchor section of Winslow Township as a mission to Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Berlin, New Jersey.
  • 1928: Blue Anchor and Tansboro Schools are built.
  • 1940: Closed Dunbarton and North Tansboro Schools are sold.
  • 1955: A hospital is established at Ancora.
  • Geography

    According to the United States Census Bureau, township had a total area of 58.192 square miles (150.716 km2), including 57.342 square miles (148.515 km2) of land and 0.850 square miles (2.201 km2) of water (1.46%).

    Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located wholly or partially within the township include Albion, Ancora, Braddock, Blue Anchor, Cedar Brook, Dicktown, Elm, Florence, New Freedom, Pen Byrn, Sicklertown, Sicklerville, Spring Garden, Tansboro, Waterford, Waterford Works, West Atco, Williamstown, Winslow Junction and Winslow Village.

    The Blue Hole is a body of water in the middle of woods that is clear blue and always cold, even in the summer, with a very steep shoreline and a maximum depth of approximately 70 feet (21 m), though Weird NJ describes the water as "bottomless" and claims that it is a haunt of the Jersey Devil.

    The township borders Berlin Borough, Chesilhurst, Pine Hill, Waterford Township in Camden County, both Folsom, Hammonton in Atlantic County, and both Monroe Township and Washington Township in Gloucester County.

    2010 Census

    As of the census of 2010, there were 39,499 people, 13,735 households, and 10,178 families residing in the township. The population density was 688.8 per square mile (265.9/km2). There were 14,560 housing units at an average density of 253.9 per square mile (98.0/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 54.41% (21,491) White, 36.17% (14,287) Black or African American, 0.29% (113) Native American, 3.10% (1,224) Asian, 0.04% (14) Pacific Islander, 2.97% (1,172) from other races, and 3.03% (1,198) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.10% (3,200) of the population.

    There were 13,735 households out of which 35.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.7% were married couples living together, 16.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.9% were non-families. 20.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.25.

    In the township, the population was spread out with 25.7% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 28.1% from 25 to 44, 27.4% from 45 to 64, and 10.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.3 years. For every 100 females there were 92.6 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 89.6 males.

    The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $68,169 (with a margin of error of +/- $2,425) and the median family income was $78,892 (+/- $4,026). Males had a median income of $53,815 (+/- $1,828) versus $44,860 (+/- $2,189) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $27,884 (+/- $974). About 4.1% of families and 6.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.3% of those under age 18 and 7.3% of those age 65 or over.

    2000 Census

    As of the 2000 United States Census there were 34,611 people, 11,661 households, and 9,002 families residing in the township. The population density was 599.9 people per square mile (231.6/km²). There were 12,413 housing units at an average density of 215.1/sq mi (83.1/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 69.34% White, 29.34% African American, 0.35% Native American, 1.30% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.58% from other races, and 1.96% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.31% of the population.

    There were 11,661 households out of which 41.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.2% were married couples living together, 13.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.8% were non-families. 18.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.87 and the average family size was 3.28.

    In the township the population was spread out with 28.8% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 34.4% from 25 to 44, 21.3% from 45 to 64, and 8.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.5 males.

    The median income for a household in the township was $55,990, and the median income for a family was $62,045. Males had a median income of $43,320 versus $31,657 for females. The per capita income for the township was $21,254. About 4.5% of families and 6.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.1% of those under age 18 and 7.7% of those age 65 or over.

    Local government

    Winslow Township is governed under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government by a mayor and an eight-member Township Committee. The mayor is elected at-large to a four-year term of office. Committee Members are elected in partisan elections to three-year terms in office on a staggered basis, with one seat coming up for election from each of the four wards in two consecutive years as part of the November general election.

    As of 2016, the Mayor of Winslow Township is Democrat Barry Wright, whose term of office ends December 31, 2019. Members of the Winslow Township Committee are:

  • Ward 1: Paula Paretti (R, 2018) and Edward J. Pleczynski (D, 2017)
  • Ward 2: George Lowery (D, 2018) and Evelyn M. Leverett (D, 2017)
  • Ward 3: Raymond Watkins Jr. (D, 2018) and Marie D. Lawrence (D, 2017)
  • Ward 4: John A. Wilson (D, 2018) and Charles Flamini (D, 2017)
  • Federal, state and county representation

    Winslow Township is located in the 1st Congressional District and is part of New Jersey's 4th state legislative district. Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Winslow Township had been in the 6th state legislative district.

    New Jersey's First Congressional District is represented by Donald Norcross (D, Camden). New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021) and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).

    For the 2016–2017 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 4th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Fred H. Madden (D, Washington Township, Gloucester County) and in the General Assembly by Paul Moriarty (D, Washington Township, Gloucester County) and Gabriela Mosquera (D, Gloucester Township). The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township). The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).

    Camden County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members chosen at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year. As of 2015, Camden County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli, Jr. (Collingswood, term as freeholder ends December 31, 2017; term as director ends 2015), Freeholder Deputy Director Edward T. McDonnell (Pennsauken Township, term as freeholder ends 2016; term as deputy director ends 2015), Michelle Gentek (Gloucester Township, 2015), Ian K. Leonard (Camden, 2015), Jeffrey L. Nash (Cherry Hill, 2015), Carmen Rodriguez (Merchantville, 2016) and Jonathan L. Young, Sr. (Berlin Township, November 2015; serving the unexpired term of Scot McCray ending in 2017)

    Camden County's constitutional officers, all elected directly by voters, are County clerk Joseph Ripa, Sheriff Charles H. Billingham, and Surrogate Patricia Egan Jones. The Camden County Prosecutor Mary Eva Colalillo was appointed by the Governor of New Jersey with the advice and consent of the New Jersey Senate (the upper house of the New Jersey Legislature).

    Politics

    As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 24,975 registered voters in Winslow Township, of which 10,782 (43.2%) were registered as Democrats, 2,898 (11.6%) were registered as Republicans and 11,283 (45.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 12 voters registered to other parties.

    In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 70.6% of the vote (12,183 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 28.6% (4,937 votes), and other candidates with 0.8% (137 votes), among the 17,355 ballots cast by the township's 26,855 registered voters (98 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 64.6%. In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 68.5% of the vote (12,630 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain, who received around 29.0% (5,355 votes), with 18,445 ballots cast among the township's 24,426 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.5%. In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 62.2% of the vote (9,305 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush, who received around 36.6% (5,478 votes), with 14,963 ballots cast among the township's 21,944 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 68.2.

    In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 51.8% of the vote (4,502 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 47.1% (4,091 votes), and other candidates with 1.2% (102 votes), among the 8,873 ballots cast by the township's 26,875 registered voters (178 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 33.0%. In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 56.5% of the vote (5,711 ballots cast), ahead of both Republican Chris Christie with 37.4% (3,775 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 3.7% (377 votes), with 10,102 ballots cast among the township's 24,894 registered voters, yielding a 40.6% turnout.

    Education

    The Winslow Township School District is a public school district that serves students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grades. The district was formed in 1998, after voters approved a split from the Lower Camden County Regional School District, creating the Edgewood (later renamed Winslow) middle and high schools in 2001 to accompany the previously existing K-6 operation.

    As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's eight schools had an enrollment of 4,932 students and 435.2 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.33:1. Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are Winslow Township Elementary School No. 1 (337 students; in grades PreK-3), Winslow Township Elementary School No. 2 (317; PreK-3), Winslow Township Elementary School No. 3 (378; PreK-3), Winslow Township Elementary School No. 4 (443; PreK-3), Winslow Township Elementary School No. 5 (675; 4-6), Winslow Township Elementary School No. 6 (540; 4-6), Winslow Township Middle School (842; 6-8) and Winslow Township High School (1,400; 9-12).

    Students from Chesilhurst attend the district's schools as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Chesilhurst Borough School District. The Chesilhurst district had served public school students in kindergarten through sixth grade at Shirley B. Foster Elementary School until the completion of the 2008-09 school year, after which the district was no longer operating any schools and began sending all of its students to the Winslow Township schools as part of an expansion of the pre-existing sending/receiving relationship that commenced in the 2009-10 school year.

    Roads and highways

    As of May 2010, the township had a total of 245.16 miles (394.55 km) of roadways, of which 159.89 miles (257.32 km) were maintained by the municipality, 57.57 miles (92.65 km) by Camden County and 16.50 miles (26.55 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 11.20 miles (18.02 km) by the South Jersey Transportation Authority.

    Winslow is criss-crossed by several major roads, such as U.S. Route 30, Route 73, and Route 143. The Atlantic City Expressway passes through the southwestern part of the township, with four interchanges: Exits 41, 38, 33, and 31.

    Public transportation

    NJ Transit bus service is available on the 316 with seasonal service between Cape May and Philadelphia and the 400 route between Sicklerville and Philadelphia. Local service is available on the 459 bus between Voorhees Town Center and the Avandale park-and-ride and the 463 route between Woodbury and the Avandale park-and-ride. Service to Atlantic City is offered on the 551 route between Ocean City and Philadelphia and on the 554 route to the Lindenwold station. There are no buses that provide service within reasonable walking distance to the Municipal Building.

    Park and Ride bus service is located within the township at the Avandale park and ride, which offers 322 parking spots for NJ Transit passengers.

    Wineries

  • Amalthea Cellars
  • Sharrott Winery
  • Tomasello Winery
  • Notable people

    People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Winslow Township include:

  • Quinton Alston (born 1993), football linebacker who signed with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.
  • Bill Belton (born 1992), running back.
  • Jessica Boyington (born 1985), Miss New Jersey USA 2006 and on-air television news personality.
  • Jordan Burroughs (born 1988), Olympic Gold Medal wrestler.
  • Shonn Greene (born 1985), running back for the Tennessee Titans.
  • Andrew K. Hay (1809–1881), represented New Jersey's 1st congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1849 to 1851.
  • Kyle Hines (born 1986), professional basketball player who plays for CSKA Moscow of the VTB United League.
  • Tyler Hines (born 1990), professional basketball player.
  • Brendan McHugh (born 1990), swimmer who specializes in breaststroke events.
  • Leroy Smith (born 1969), college football defensive end who played for the Iowa Hawkeyes football team.
  • Hakeem Valles (born 1992), tight end for the Arizona Cardinals.
  • Max Valles (born 1994), defensive end for the Buffalo Bills.
  • References

    Winslow Township, New Jersey Wikipedia


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