Tripti Joshi

The Haunting (1999 film)

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Director  Jan de Bont
Screenplay  David Self
Duration  
Language  English
4.9/10 IMDb


Genre  Fantasy, Horror, Mystery
Music director  Jerry Goldsmith
Country  United States United Kingdom
The Haunting (1999 film) movie poster
Release date  July 23, 1999 (1999-07-23)
Based on  The Haunting of Hill House  by Shirley Jackson
Writer  David Self (screenplay), Shirley Jackson (novel)
Adapted from  The Haunting of Hill House, The Haunting
Cast  Liam Neeson (Dr. David Marrow), Catherine Zeta-Jones (Theo), Owen Wilson (Luke Sanderson), Lili Taylor (Eleanor 'Nell' Vance), Bruce Dern (Mr. Dudley), Marian Seldes (Mrs. Dudley)
Similar movies  The Lazarus Effect, Irreversible, Cashback, The Mine, Unholy Women, House of Flesh Mannequins
Tagline  Some houses are born bad.

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The Haunting is a 1999 American supernatural horror film directed by Jan de Bont. The film is a remake of the psychological horror film of the same name. Both of them are based on the 1959 novel, The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson. The Haunting stars Liam Neeson, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Owen Wilson and Lili Taylor. It was released in the United States on July 23, 1999.

Contents

The Haunting (1999 film) movie scenes

The haunting 1999 official trailer 1 liam neeson horror movie


Plot

The Haunting (1999 film) movie scenes

Eleanor "Nell" Vance (Lili Taylor) has cared for her invalid mother for 11 years. After her mother dies, her sister Jane (Virginia Madsen) and Jane's boyfriend Lou (Tom Irwin) eject her. Nell receives a phone call about an insomnia study, directed by Dr. David Marrow (Liam Neeson) at Hill House, a secluded manor in the Berkshires of western Massachusetts, and applies for it. At the house, she meets Mr. and Mrs. Dudley (Bruce Dern, Marian Seldes), a strange pair of caretakers. Two other participants arrive, Luke Sanderson (Owen Wilson) and Theodora (Catherine Zeta-Jones), along with Dr. Marrow and his two research assistants. Unknown to the participants, Dr. Marrow’s true purpose is to study the psychological response to fear, intending to expose his subjects to increasing amounts of terror. Each night, the caretakers chain the gate outside Hill House, preventing anyone from getting in or out until morning.

The Haunting (1999 film) movie scenes

During their first night, Dr. Marrow relates the story of Hill House. The house was built by Hugh Crain (Charles Gunning)—a 19th-century textile tycoon. Crain built the house for his wife, hoping to populate it with a large family of children; however, all of Crain's children died during their birth. Crain's wife Renee killed herself before the house was finished and Crain became a recluse. After the story, Marrow's assistant's face is slashed by a snapped clavichord wire. The freak accident causes Marrow's research assistants to leave. Nell begins to suspect that it was no accident, as she notices that the wire was unwound by someone or something. Theo and Nell begin to experience unusual happenings within the house, such as a mysterious force trying to open the door, Nell starts seeing ghosts of children in curtains and sheets, Hugh Crain's wood portrait morphs into a skeletal face and is vandalized with the words "Welcome Home Eleanor" written in blood. Theo and Luke try to establish their innocence, but Nell tells them that they don't know her.

The Haunting (1999 film) movie scenes

Nell becomes determined to prove that the house is haunted by ghostly children who are only terrorized and killed by Crain's cruelty. She learns that Crain kidnapped the children from his cotton mills and slaughtered them, then burned their bodies in the fireplace, trapping their ghosts and forcing them to remain with him, providing him with an 'eternal family'. She also learns that Crain had a second wife named Carolyn, from whom she is descended. Dr. Marrow is skeptical of Eleanor's claims, until he realizes he made a mistake by bringing them to Hill House when a statue tries to drown him in a pool of water in a greenhouse. After several more terrifying events, Nell insists that she cannot leave the ghosts of the kids to suffer for eternity at Crain's hands. Trying to convince Eleanor to leave the house with them, Theo offers to let Nell move in with her, but Nell reveals her relation to Carolyn and claims she must help the children to "move on" to the afterlife.

The Haunting (1999 film) movie scenes

Hugh Crain's ghost seals up the house, trapping them all inside. A frustrated Luke defaces a portrait of Hugh Crain. Crain's enraged spirit drags Luke to the fireplace where he is decapitated. Nell is able to lead Crain's spirit towards an iron door. The spirits pull Crain into the door, dragging him down to Hell. Nell is pulled with him, inflicting fatal trauma on her body, but the ghosts gently release her on the ground. Her ghost rises up to Heaven, accompanied by the children's ghosts. After Nell's death and when she moved on to Heaven along with the ghosts, Theo and Dr. Marrow wait by the gate outside until the Dudleys come in the morning.

The Haunting (1999 film) movie scenes

The Dudleys approach as the sun rises. Mr. Dudley asks Dr. Marrow if he found what he wanted to know, but the traumatized psychiatrist does not give an answer, and neither does Theo. When the gate opens, the two silently walk out and down the road, leaving Hill House behind them.

Cast

The Haunting (1999 film) movie scenes
  • Lili Taylor as Eleanor "Nell" Vance
  • Liam Neeson as Doctor David Marrow
  • Catherine Zeta-Jones as Theodora "Theo"
  • Owen Wilson as Luke Sanderson
  • Marian Seldes as Mrs. Dudley
  • Bruce Dern as Mr. Dudley
  • Alix Koromzay as Mary Lambetta
  • Todd Field as Todd Hackett
  • Virginia Madsen as Jane Vance
  • Tom Irwin as Lou
  • Charles Gunning as Hugh Crain
  • Debi Derryberry, Jessica Evans, Sherry Lynn, Miles Marsico, Courtland Mead, Kyle McDougle, Kelsey Mulrooney and Hannah Swanson as the voices of the children
  • Production

    The Haunting (1999 film) movie scenes

    Wes Craven was at one point developing a remake of The Haunting, but dropped out in favor of Scream. Under DreamWorks, the film was originally to have been a collaboration between Steven Spielberg (mainly, as director) and Stephen King (as screenwriter), but the two had creative differences. King instead wrote the teleplay for Rose Red, a television miniseries that shares many elements with Jackson's source novel, The Haunting of Hill House, and the character of the real-life edifice Winchester Mystery House, in San Jose, California.

    Argentine production designer Eugenio Zanetti (Restoration - 1995 and What Dreams May Come - 1998) oversaw the set designs.

    The CGI was done by Tippett Studio and Industrial Light and Magic.

    Filming

    Harlaxton Manor, in England, was used as the exterior of Hill House. The billiard room scene was filmed in the Great Hall of the manor, while many of the interior sets were built inside the dome-shaped hangar that once housed The Spruce Goose, near the permanently docked RMS Queen Mary steamship, in Long Beach, California. The kitchen scenes were filmed at Belvoir Castle.

    Critical reception

    The Haunting was panned upon its release, with most critics citing its weak screenplay, its overuse of horror clichés, and its overdone CGI effects. Rotten Tomatoes gave the film a "Rotten" rating of 17%, with the critical consensus stating "Sophisticated visual effects fail to offset awkward performances and an uneven script". As a result of the negative reviews, it was nominated for five Razzie Awards. Roger Ebert was one of few critics to give the film a positive review, praising the production design in particular.

    References

    The Haunting (1999 film) Wikipedia
    The Haunting (1999 film) IMDbThe Haunting (1999 film) Rotten TomatoesThe Haunting (1999 film) Roger EbertThe Haunting (1999 film) themoviedb.org


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