Rahul Sharma (Editor)

Lamniformes

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Kingdom  Animalia
Scientific name  Lamniformes
Phylum  Chordata
Superorder  Selachimorpha
Higher classification  Shark
Lamniformes img14deviantartnetd82di201421799sharksof
Order  LamniformesL. S. Berg, 1958
Length  great white shark: 4.5 – 6.4 m
Speed  Great white shark: 40 km/h
Mass  Great white shark: 680 – 1,100 kg, shortfin mako shark: 280 kg, Basking shark: 2,200 kg
Lower classifications  Lamnidae, Carcharodon, Isurus, thresher shark, Sand shark

Lamniformes 100 enemy shark mating ritual live


The Lamniformes (from the Greek word, Lamna "fish of prey") are an order of sharks commonly known as mackerel sharks (which may also refer specifically to the family Lamnidae). It includes some of the most familiar species of sharks, such as the great white shark, as well as more unusual representatives, such as the goblin shark and the megamouth shark.

Contents

Lamniformes Lamniformes mackerel sharks Wildlife Journal Junior

Members of the order are distinguished by possessing two dorsal fins, an anal fin, five gill slits, eyes without nictitating membranes, and a mouth extending behind the eyes. Also, unlike other sharks, they maintain a higher body temperature than the surrounding water.

Lamniformes Guide to Shark Identification Lamniformes

Species

Lamniformes Shark Savers Mackerel Sharks

The order Lamniformes includes 10 families with 22 species, with a total of seven living families and 17 living species:

Order Lamniformes

Lamniformes BBC Nature Mackerel sharks videos news and facts
  • Family Alopiidae Bonaparte, 1838 (thresher sharks)
  • Genus Alopias Rafinesque, 1810
  • Alopias pelagicus Nakamura, 1935 (pelagic thresher) [1]
  • Alopias superciliosus R. T. Lowe, 1841 (bigeye thresher) [2]
  • Alopias vulpinus (Bonnaterre, 1788) (common thresher) [3]
  • Alopias sp. not yet described
  • Family Anacoracidae Capetta, 1987 (crow sharks)
  • Genus Squalicorax
  • Genus Telodontaspis
  • Genus Pseudocorax
  • Genus Myledaphus
  • Family Cetorhinidae Gill, 1862
  • Genus Cetorhinus Blainville, 1816
  • Cetorhinus maximus (Gunnerus, 1765) (basking shark) [4]
  • Family Eoptolamnidae*
  • Genus Leptostyrax*
  • Leptostyrax macrorhiza
  • Family Lamnidae J. P. Müller and Henle, 1838
  • Genus Carcharodon A. Smith, 1838
  • Carcharodon Carcharias (Linnaeus, 1758) (great white shark) [5]
  • Carcharodon hubbelli
  • Genus Isurus Rafinesque, 1810
  • Isurus oxyrinchus Rafinesque, 1810 (shortfin mako) [6]
  • Isurus paucus Guitart-Manday, 1966 (longfin mako) [7]
  • Genus Lamna Cuvier, 1816
  • Lamna ditropis Hubbs & Follett, 1947 (Salmon shark) [8]
  • Lamna nasus (Bonnaterre, 1788) (porbeagle) [9]
  • Family Megachasmidae Taylor, Compagno & Struhsaker, 1983
  • Genus Megachasma Taylor, Compagno & Struhsaker, 1983
  • Megachasma pelagios Taylor, Compagno & Struhsaker, 1983 (megamouth shark) [10]
  • Family Mitsukurinidae D. S. Jordan, 1898
  • Genus Mitsukurina D. S. Jordan, 1898
  • Mitsukurina owstoni D. S. Jordan, 1898 (goblin shark) [11]
  • Family Odontaspididae Müller & Henle, 1839
  • Genus Carcharias Rafinesque, 1810
  • Carcharias taurus Rafinesque, 1810 (sand tiger shark) [12]
  • Genus Odontaspis Agassiz, 1838
  • Odontaspis ferox (Risso, 1810) (smalltooth sand tiger) [13]
  • Odontaspis noronhai (Maul, 1955) (bigeye sand tiger) [14]
  • Family Pseudocarchariidae Compagno, 1973
  • Genus Pseudocarcharias Cadenat, 1963
  • Pseudocarcharias kamoharai (Matsubara, 1936) (crocodile shark) [15]
  • Family Cardabiodontidae (extinct)
  • Genus Cardabiodon Michael Silverson, 1999
  • Cardabiodon ricki Michael Silverson, 1999
  • Family Cretoxyrhinidae (Extinct)
  • Genus Cretoxyrhina Agassiz, 1843
  • Cretoxyrhina mantelli Agassiz, 1843 (ginsu shark) †
  • Family Otodontidae (extinct)
  • Genus Carcharocles
  • Carcharocles auriculatus (Jordan, 1923)
  • Carcharocles angustidens (Agassiz, 1843)
  • Carcharocles chubutensis (Agassiz, 1843)
  • Carcharocles megalodon (Agassiz, 1843) (megatooth shark) † (genus disputed)
  • Sustainable consumption

    In 2010, Greenpeace International added the shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) to its seafood red list.


    Lamniformes M24htm

    References

    Lamniformes Wikipedia


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