Siddhesh Joshi (Editor)

Free, White and 21

Updated on
Share on FacebookTweet on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Reddit
Covid-19
3.2/101 Votes Alchetron
3.2
1 Ratings
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
31
20
10
Rate This

Rate This

Director  Larry Buchanan
Duration  
Music director  Joey Johnson
Language  English
3.1/10 IMDb

Genre  Drama
Running time  1h 44m
Country  United States
Free, White and 21 movie poster
Release date  1963 (1963)
Writer  Larry Buchanan, Harold Hoffman, Cliff Pope
Cast  Frederick O'Neal (Ernie Jones), Annalena Lund (Greta Mae Hansen), George Edgley (Judge), Johnny Hicks (Prosecuting Attorney Atkins), George Russell (Defense Attorney Tyler), Hugh Crenshaw (Assistant Prosecuting Attorney)
Screenplay  Larry Buchanan, Harold Hoffman, Cliff Pope
Similar movies  Related Larry Buchanan movies
Tagline  You must see it from the beginning.

Free white and 21 1963 trailer


Free, White and 21 is a 1963 movie by self-proclaimed "schlockmeister" Larry Buchanan. It was based on the true story of the controversial trial of a black man accused of raping a white woman in Dallas, Texas in the 1960s. The title is a version of the archaic American idiomatic phrase "free, white, and twenty-one" which means "beholden to no one".

Contents

Free, White and 21 wwwgstaticcomtvthumbmovieposters41310p41310

Free white and 21 1963 trailer starring frederick o neal


Plot

The central conflict in this film is whether African-American businessman Ernie Jones (played by Frederick O'Neal) raped Swedish immigrant and civil rights Freedom Rider Greta Mae Hansen (played by Annalena Lund). Jones was the proprietor of the hotel at which Hansen decided to stay during her time in Dallas. The movie is primarily a courtroom drama, with many of the key events portrayed in flashback sequences as Jones and Hansen testify.

Production

The movie was based on a true story about an English girl who stayed at a motel owned by a black man, Tony Davis, who was a disc jockey. She later claimed Davis raped her and he was arrested. Davis was a friend of Buchanan and agreed to work with him on the film even before the trial finished.

Before the film was finished, Buchanan showed an assembly cut to James H. Nicholson and Samuel Z. Arkoff of American International Pictures (AIP), who agreed to distribute it.

Release

The film was released with the gimmick of having the audiences act as a jury and be given ballot papers to mark deciding whether the accused was innocent or guilty. The movie was successful at the box office and led to a series of collaborations between Buchanan and AIP.

References

Free, White and 21 Wikipedia
Free, White and 21 IMDbFree, White and 21 themoviedb.org


Similar Topics
Frederick O'Neal
Larry Buchanan
Lock Up (film)
Topics
 
B
i
Link
H2
L