Neha Patil

AACTA Awards

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Official website  
AACTA Awards wwwbkicomaucontentuploads201202dsc0228co
Awarded for  "To recognise and honour outstanding achievement in the Australian film and television industry."
Presented by  Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA)
First awarded  1958 (to honour achievements of 1957/1958)
Network  ABC (1977, 1980–1983, 1986–1987, 1989–1990, 1993, 1995, 1997, 2003–2004) SBS (1998–2000) Seven Network (1978, 2001, 2016–) Nine Network (1976, 2005–2012) Ovation (2004) Network Ten (1985, 2002, 2013–2015) Arena (2013–present)
Ceremony date  December 5, 2016, 1:00 AM PST
Related award  AACTA International Awards
Winners  Odessa YoungThe Daughter, Odessa Young, Best Lead Actress, Best Lead Actress, Andrew GarfieldHacksaw Ridge, Andrew Garfield, Best Lead Actor, Best Lead Actor, Hacksaw RidgeBill Mechanic - David Permut - Bruce Davey -, Hacksaw Ridge, Best Film, Best Film, Mel GibsonHacksaw Ridge, Mel Gibson, Best Direction, Best Direction, Hacksaw RidgeHugo Weaving, Hacksaw Ridge, Best Supporting Actor, Best Supporting Actor, Miranda OttoThe Daughter, Miranda Otto, Best Supporting Actress, Best Supporting Actress, Paul Hogan, Paul Hogan, Raymond Longford Award, Raymond Longford Award, Hacksaw RidgeRobert Schenkkan - Andrew Knight, Hacksaw Ridge, Best Original Screenplay, Best Original Screenplay, Hacksaw RidgeJohn Gilbert, Hacksaw Ridge, Best Editing, Best Editing, Hacksaw RidgeSimon Duggan, Hacksaw Ridge, Best Cinematography, Best Cinematography, Hacksaw RidgeBarry Robison, Hacksaw Ridge, Best Production Design, Best Production Design, Hacksaw RidgeKevin O'Connell - Mario Vaccaro - Robert Mackenzie -, Hacksaw Ridge, Best Sound, Best Sound, TannaAntony Partos, Tanna, Best Original Music Score, Best Original Music Score, Elizabeth DebickiThe Kettering Incident, Elizabeth Debicki, Best Lead Actress in a Television Drama, Best Lead Actress in a Television Drama, WentworthJo Porter - Pino Amenta, Wentworth, Best Television Drama Series, Best Television Drama Series, Girl AsleepJonathon Oxlade, Girl Asleep, Best Costume Design, Best Costume Design, The DaughterSimon Stone, The Daughter, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Adapted Screenplay, Samuel JohnsonMolly, Samuel Johnson, Best Lead Actor in Television Drama, Best Lead Actor in Television Drama, The Kettering IncidentVictoria Madden - Vincent Sheehan - Andrew Walker, The Kettering Incident, Best Telefeature or Mini Series, Best Telefeature or Mini Series, Damon HerrimanSecret City, Damon Herriman, Best Guest or Supporting Actor in a Television Drama, Best Guest or Supporting Actor in a Television Drama, Kate WinsletThe Dressmaker, Kate Winslet, Best Lead Actress, Best Lead Actress, Michael CatonLast Cab to Darwin, Michael Caton, Best Lead Actor, Best Lead Actor, Mad Max: Fury RoadGeorge Miller - Doug Mitchell - PJ Voeten, Mad Max: Fury Road, Best Film, Best Film, George MillerMad Max: Fury Road, George Miller, Best Direction, Best Direction, The DressmakerHugo Weaving, The Dressmaker, Best Supporting Actor, Best Supporting Actor, Judy DavisThe Dressmaker, Judy Davis, Best Supporting Actress, Best Supporting Actress, Cate Blanchett, Cate Blanchett, Raymond Longford Award, Raymond Longford Award, Paper PlanesRobert Connolly - Steve Worland, Paper Planes, Best Original Screenplay, Best Original Screenplay, Mad Max: Fury RoadMargaret Sixel, Mad Max: Fury Road, Best Editing, Best Editing, Mad Max: Fury RoadJohn Seale, Mad Max: Fury Road, Best Cinematography, Best Cinematography, Mad Max: Fury RoadColin Gibson, Mad Max: Fury Road, Best Production Design, Best Production Design, Mad Max: Fury RoadChris Jenkins - Mark Mangini - Gregg Rudloff -, Mad Max: Fury Road, Best Sound, Best Sound, Mad Max: Fury RoadJunkie XL, Mad Max: Fury Road, Best Original Music Score, Best Original Music Score, Pamela RabeWentworth, Pamela Rabe, Best Lead Actress in a Television Drama, Best Lead Actress in a Television Drama, GlitchTony Ayres - Louise Fox - Ewan Burnett, Glitch, Best Television Drama Series, Best Television Drama Series, The DressmakerMarion Boyce - Margot Wilson, The Dressmaker, Best Costume Design, Best Costume Design, Last Cab to DarwinJeremy Sims - Reg Cribb, Last Cab to Darwin, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Adapted Screenplay, Joel JacksonPeter Allen: Not the Boy Next Door, Joel Jackson, Best Lead Actor in Television Drama, Best Lead Actor in Television Drama, Peter Allen: Not the Boy Next DoorKerrie Mainwaring - Rory Callaghan, Peter Allen: Not the Boy Next Door, Best Telefeature or Mini Series, Best Telefeature or Mini Series, Ky BaldwinPeter Allen: Not the Boy Next Door, Ky Baldwin, Best Guest or Supporting Actor in a Television Drama, Best Guest or Supporting Actor in a Television Drama, Sarah SnookPredestination, Sarah Snook, Best Lead Actress, Best Lead Actress, David GulpililCharlie's Country, David Gulpilil, Best Lead Actor, Best Lead Actor, The Water DivinerKeith Rodger - Troy Lum - Andrew Mason, The Water Diviner, Best Film, Best Film, The BabadookKristina Ceyton - Kristian Moliere, The Babadook, Best Film, Best Film, Jennifer KentThe Babadook, Jennifer Kent, Best Direction, Best Direction, The Water DivinerYılmaz Erdoğan, The Water Diviner, Best Supporting Actor, Best Supporting Actor, Susan PriorThe Rover, Susan Prior, Best Supporting Actress, Best Supporting Actress, Andrew Knight, Andrew Knight, Raymond Longford Award, Raymond Longford Award, The BabadookJennifer Kent, The Babadook, Best Original Screenplay, Best Original Screenplay, PredestinationMatt Villa, Predestination, Best Editing, Best Editing, PredestinationBen Nott, Predestination, Best Cinematography, Best Cinematography, PredestinationMatthew Putland, Predestination, Best Production Design, Best Production Design, The RoverSam Petty - Brooke Trezise - Justine Angus -, The Rover, Best Sound, Best Sound, The Railway ManDavid Hirschfelder, The Railway Man, Best Original Music Score, Best Original Music Score, Marta DusseldorpJanet King, Marta Dusseldorp, Best Lead Actress in a Television Drama, Best Lead Actress in a Television Drama, The CodeShelley Birse - David Taylor - David Maher, The Code, Best Television Drama Series, Best Television Drama Series, The Water DivinerTess Schofield, The Water Diviner, Best Costume Design, Best Costume Design, The Railway ManFrank Cottrell-Boyce - Andy Paterson, The Railway Man, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Adapted Screenplay, Ashley ZukermanThe Code, Ashley Zukerman, Best Lead Actor in Television Drama, Best Lead Actor in Television Drama, Devil's PlaygroundSimon Burke - Penny Chapman - Helen Bowden -, Devil's Playground, Best Telefeature or Mini Series, Best Telefeature or Mini Series, Rose ByrneThe Turning, Rose Byrne, Best Lead Actress, Best Lead Actress, Leonardo DiCaprioThe Great Gatsby, Leonardo DiCaprio, Best Lead Actor, Best Lead Actor, The Great GatsbyBaz Luhrmann - Catherine Martin - Lucy Fisher -, The Great Gatsby, Best Film, Best Film, Baz LuhrmannThe Great Gatsby, Baz Luhrmann, Best Direction, Best Direction, The Great GatsbyJoel Edgerton, The Great Gatsby, Best Supporting Actor, Best Supporting Actor, Elizabeth DebickiThe Great Gatsby, Elizabeth Debicki, Best Supporting Actress, Best Supporting Actress, Jacki Weaver, Jacki Weaver, Raymond Longford Award, Raymond Longford Award, The RocketKim Mordaunt, The Rocket, Best Original Screenplay, Best Original Screenplay, The Great GatsbyMatt Villa - Jason Ballantine - Jonathan Redmond, The Great Gatsby, Best Editing, Best Editing, The Great GatsbySimon Duggan, The Great Gatsby, Best Cinematography, Best Cinematography, The Great GatsbyCatherine Martin - Beverley Dunn - Ian Gracie -, The Great Gatsby, Best Production Design, Best Production Design, The Great GatsbySteve Maslow - Wayne Pashley - Guntis Sics -, The Great Gatsby, Best Sound, Best Sound, The Great GatsbyCraig Armstrong, The Great Gatsby, Best Original Music Score, Best Original Music Score, Claudia KarvanThe Time of Our Lives, Claudia Karvan, Best Lead Actress in a Television Drama, Best Lead Actress in a Television Drama, Redfern NowDarren Dale - Miranda Dear, Redfern Now, Best Television Drama Series, Best Television Drama Series, The Great GatsbyCatherine Martin - Kerry Thompson - Silvana Azzi Heras, The Great Gatsby, Best Costume Design, Best Costume Design, The Great GatsbyBaz Luhrmann - Craig Pearce, The Great Gatsby, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Adapted Screenplay, Lachy HulmePower Games: The Packer-Murdoch War, Lachy Hulme, Best Lead Actor in Television Drama, Best Lead Actor in Television Drama, Top of the LakeJane Campion - Iain Canning - Emile Sherman -, Top of the Lake, Best Telefeature or Mini Series, Best Telefeature or Mini Series, Luke FordPower Games: The Packer-Murdoch War, Luke Ford, Best Guest or Supporting Actor in a Television Drama, Best Guest or Supporting Actor in a Television Drama, Deborah MailmanThe Sapphires, Deborah Mailman, Best Lead Actress, Best Lead Actress, Chris O'DowdThe Sapphires, Chris O'Dowd, Best Lead Actor, Best Lead Actor, The SapphiresRosemary Blight - Kylie Du Fresne, The Sapphires, Best Film, Best Film, Wayne BlairThe Sapphires, Wayne Blair, Best Direction, Best Direction, Wish You Were HereAntony Starr, Wish You Were Here, Best Supporting Actor, Best Supporting Actor, Jessica MauboyThe Sapphires, Jessica Mauboy, Best Supporting Actress, Best Supporting Actress, Al Clark, Al Clark, Raymond Longford Award, Raymond Longford Award, Wish You Were HereFelicity Price - Kieran Darcy-Smith, Wish You Were Here, Best Original Screenplay, Best Original Screenplay, The SapphiresDany Cooper, The Sapphires, Best Editing, Best Editing, The SapphiresWarwick Thornton, The Sapphires, Best Cinematography, Best Cinematography, The SapphiresMelinda Doring, The Sapphires, Best Production Design, Best Production Design, The SapphiresBen Osmo - Andrew Plain - Bry Jones -, The Sapphires, Best Sound, Best Sound, Not Suitable for ChildrenJono Ma - Matteo Zingales, Not Suitable for Children, Best Original Music Score, Best Original Music Score, Leah PurcellRedfern Now, Leah Purcell, Best Lead Actress in a Television Drama, Best Lead Actress in a Television Drama, Puberty BluesImogen Banks - John Edwards, Puberty Blues, Best Television Drama Series, Best Television Drama Series, The SapphiresTess Schofield, The Sapphires, Best Costume Design, Best Costume Design, The SapphiresTony Briggs - Keith Thompson, The Sapphires, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Adapted Screenplay, Richard RoxburghRake, Richard Roxburgh, Best Lead Actor in Television Drama, Best Lead Actor in Television Drama, Howzat! Kerry Packer's WarJohn Edwards - Mimi Butler, Howzat! Kerry Packer's War, Best Telefeature or Mini Series, Best Telefeature or Mini Series, Aaron JefferyUnderbelly, Aaron Jeffery, Best Guest or Supporting Actor in a Television Drama, Best Guest or Supporting Actor in a Television Drama

2016 aacta awards paul hogan tribute


The Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards, known as the AACTA Awards, are presented annually by the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA). The awards recognise excellence of professionals in the film and television industry, including the producers, directors, actors, writers and cinematographers. It is the most prestigious awards ceremony for the Australian film and television industry. They are generally considered to be the Australian counterpart of the Academy Awards and British Academy Awards.

Contents

The awards, previously called Australian Film Institute Awards or AFI Awards, began in 1958 and involved 30 nominations across six categories. They expanded in 1986 to cover television as well as film. The AACTA Awards were instituted in 2011. As of 2011, the Australian awards take place at the Sydney Opera House in Sydney and the International Awards, inaugurated on 27 January 2012, are presented every January in Los Angeles.

Where s wilma aacta awards 2015 red carpet


1958–2010: AFI Awards

The awards were presented annually by the Australian Film Institute (AFI) as the Australian Film Institute Awards (more commonly known as the AFI Awards), "to recognise and honour outstanding achievement in the Australian film and television industry." They were instituted in 1958, "as a way to improve the impoverished state of Australian cinema", and was part of the Melbourne International Film Festival (known then as the Melbourne Film Festival) until 1972. The first AFI Awards ceremony consisted of seven fields: Documentary, Educational, Advertising, Experimental Film, Public Relations and Teaching, and an Open category for other films which didn't fit in the aforementioned categories. Between 1958–1980, submitted films were presented with a gold, silver or bronze prize, and in some circumstances, a Grand Prix award, which was the highest honour a film could receive. Additionally, films were also presented with a gold or silver medallion for technical achievements, and films which didn't receive a prize was given a certificate of honourable mention. From the awards inception to 1968, documentary and educational films were the only films submitted for awards due to few feature films produced in Australia, but in 1969, Jack and Jill: A Postscript became the first feature film to receive an award from the AFI, with a silver prize in the "Open" category, and is considered a winner in the Best Film category of the current awards. Up until 1970, prizes were handed out in recognition of the film and production, rather than achievements of individual filmmakers and crafts people. However, from 1971 special achievement awards were introduced to recognise actors, directors, screenwriters, musicians, editors and cinematographers in feature films, and from 1975, an additional cash prize was given per achievement. In 1977 feature film categories became competitive, while non-feature films continued to be awarded the gold, silver and bronze prizes until 1981, when they also became competitive. In 1976 the awards were broadcast live on television for the first time on the Nine Network at the Hilton Hotel in Melbourne. In 1986 television categories were introduced, presenting awards for mini-series and telefeatures before expanding to dramas, comedies and documentaries in the 1990s.

2011–present: AACTA Awards

In June 2011, the AFI announced an industry consultation for an "Australian Academy". The aim of the Academy is to create awareness for Australian film in local and international markets and to improve the way the AFI rewards practitioners with the formation of an "Honorary Council". Of the announcement Damian Trewhella, CEO of the AFI said, "We thought a better way to engage with the industry would be to try and improve our professional membership structure[...] It's quite a big improvement on the way the AFI does things." The consultation period ended in July 2011 and on 20 July it was announced that the AFI would go ahead with the Australian Academy with Trewhella stating that "[The AFI] envisage that this will lead to greater opportunities for those working in the industry, as well as greater audience recognition and connection with Australian screen content." The name of the new Academy was revealed on 18 August 2011 as the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA), with the awards renamed to the AACTA Awards. Prior to this announcement, the awards date and location was changed to January 2012 at the Sydney Opera House in Sydney as opposed to Melbourne where it was held for the majority of the AFI Awards history. The date change was made to align the awards with the international awards season. When the Academy announced the dates for the inaugural awards season, they introduced awards which "recognise international excellence within the categories of best film, acting, writing and direction". On 23 November 2011, it was announced that the first award to be handed out since the Academy's inception is the Longford Lyell Award, which was presented to Don McAlpine for his contribution to cinematography, at the inaugural awards luncheon.

Rules and voting

To be eligible for nomination, a production must be an Australian production or program and, in the case of a film, cannot have been previously submitted for an award; the material is sent to the AFI in DVD or video formats; for a feature film, it must have been publicly exhibited for seven consecutive days in at least two Australian states; for television and documentaries, the production must have been broadcast on television between the eligibility period. The submission of a production is accompanied by an entry fee in Australian dollars, of up to A$1680 for feature films, $400 for documentaries, $330 for short film and animation and $1125 for television categories.

At the time of the awards inception, a jury of five judges, composed of film critics and filmmakers, determined the winner of a production. In 1976, the jury system was replaced by a peer voting process for feature films which would allow public members the right to vote in the Best Film category. The nominees and winners were later peer-voted by a jury which was made up of representatives from all industry crafts, including members of guilds, who have a "professional membership" with the AFI.
When the AFI announced the launch of the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts, it introduced the Chapters who vote through a two step voting process. The fifteen Chapters consist of professionals from industry guilds and organisations including actors, producers, directors and screenwriters. In round one of feature film voting, each chapter determines the nominees for their own respective category; in round two all members of the Academy can vote for the shortlisted nominees in each category to determine the winner. All television and non-feature film awards, and feature film pre-selection are determined by juries. Members of the Australian Film Institute are eligible to vote in the Best Short Fiction Film, Best Short Animation and Audience Choice award categories only. The votes are audited by accounting firm Ernst and Young from 2011.

Statuette

Throughout the history of the awards there have been several differently designed awards given to winners. Most notable ones given are: the "Kodak film award", a gold, silver or bronze medal, which was handed out from 1958–1975; the Grand Prix award which was a "bronze leaf shaped award mounted on a square wooden base", also presented between 1958 and 1975; a statuette, made of acrylic on a silver metal base, handed out from 1979–2010; and a gold statuette, based on the Southern Cross constellation, which has been in use since 2012 for the 2011 AACTA Awards.

A medal was used between 1958 and 1975 as a gold, silver or bronze prize and depicted "three leaping jesters. Around left side, film strip with leaping jester in each frame. Around right side: THE KODAK FILM AWARD". The medal, which was designed by Andor Mészáros, represents two elements of film-making: the leaping jesters represent what the audience sees on screen; the roll of film on the right symbolises the individual frames which capture the motion depicted. It was designed in Melbourne, Victoria and minted by John Pinchas in London, in 1958.

The statuette used between 1979 and 2010 is made of "four clear acrylic rectangular prisms on a silver metal base, green felt on bottom"; a plaque, which is attached to the base, has the "afi" insignia, with the words "Australian Film Institute" beneath it; a description of the award category, the recipient of the award, and the film title cascade below each other. The statuette stands at 295mm in height, 70mm in width and 70mm in depth.

When the Australian Film Institute launched the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts, it set out to create a new gold cast statuette. The statuette, which will be handed out from 2012, for the inaugural AACTA Awards, had to "reflect the prestige and heritage of the Awards[...] but which was above all distinctly Australian", while incorporating the Southern Cross constellation and the human spirit. After receiving submissions from Australian artists, with their interpretations of the design brief, a statuette designed by sculptor Ron Gomboc became the winning design. The statuette, which has a 22 karat gold body, whose human form takes on the shape of the Southern Cross, on a tiger iron gemstone base, was designed over three months at Gomboc's home in Western Australia, before it was presented to the AFI board in June 2011. Gomboc worked with stone artist, Richard Williamson, who cut and polished each individual gemstone base for the statuette, with each base representing "[...] the unique talent and contribution to the industry of every AACTA Award recipient." When the statuette was unveiled at the launch of the Academy by Geoffrey Rush, he announced that a competition to name the award would commence, where people could log onto the Academy's Facebook page and post potential names on its wall. In the media it was well received, with Gary Maddox from the Sydney Morning Herald comparing it to the previous statuette, stating that it, "looks less like a lethal doorstop and more like a stylised Oscar, possibly Oscar's flamboyant brother waving 'hi'". The AACTA Award statuette remains the property of the Australian Film Institute, and is to remain with the winner and their heirs and descendants. It cannot be sold to a third party and if it were to part from the winner or their heir and descendants, the Academy reserves the right to repurchase it for one dollar. The award may, however, have its ownership transferred to a museum, gallery or other not-for-profit institution, at the AFI's discretion.

Ceremony

The awards were first presented in 1958 during the Melbourne Film Festival at Melbourne University's Union Theatre. Since its inception, the awards have been predominantly presented in Melbourne but the event has alternated in there and Sydney during the 1990s and 2000s (decade). Awards are handed out over two separate events; the AACTA Awards Luncheon, a black tie event where accolades are given for achievements in non-feature and short films, film production (with the exception of the Best Film, Direction and Screenplay awards), non-drama related television programs and the Longford Lyell Award; the AACTA Awards Ceremony presents the awards in all other categories at a larger venue and is broadcast on television. Awards were presented at the end of each calendar year (November or December) to celebrate film achievements of the corresponding year but beginning in 2012, the awards date was changed to January to celebrate films from the previous year.

Award categories

The Academy presents awards in feature and non-feature films, and television. As of 2014, a total of forty accolades are handed out at the annual ceremonies.

Hosts / television coverage

  • 1997: Hosted by Hugh Jackman
  • 1998: Hosted by Mary Coustas
  • 1999–2000: Hosted by Peter Kay
  • 2001: Hosted by Sigrid Thornton, John Doyle and Greig Pickhaver
  • 2002: Hosted by Paul McDermott
  • 2003: Hosted by Tony Squires
  • 2004: Hosted by Peter Berner
  • 2005: Hosted by Russell Crowe
  • 2006–2007: Hosted by Geoffrey Rush
  • 2008: Hosted by Stephen Curry
  • 2009: Hosted by Julia Zemiro
  • 2010: Hosted by Shane Jacobson
  • 2011: Hosted by Geoffrey Rush, Rachael Taylor, Richard Wilkins and Julia Morris
  • 2012: Hosted by Russell Crowe
  • 2013: Hosted by Russell Crowe
  • 2014: Hosted by Shane Bourne
  • 2015: Hosted by Cate Blanchett, Deborah Mailman
  • The awards have been televised on the Nine Network every year between 2005 until 2012 where it was broadcast by Network Ten.

    Criticisms and controversies

    There have been controversial decisions of the Australian Film Institute Awards that have led to claims that it has broken its own rules by including an unscreened mini series in the 2005 awards judging:

    The controversy is a blow for the institute, which after years of criticism this year revamped its awards in an effort to restore credibility. Producer John Edwards, who collected seven nominations for Foxtel's Love My Way, did not enter a second drama series, The Surgeon, because it missed the screening deadline. "If I'd known it was this flexible, of course I would have entered it," Edwards said. "Awards are useless if they break their own rules."

    AFIA has also been criticised for narrow selection of artists for award nominations and an unfair judging process.

    There has also been controversy over both the exclusion and inclusion of films that are technically Australian productions, but are made overseas, with foreign funding and/or foreign talent.

  • A lack of recognition for the Australian film production Disgrace (released in late 2008) was noted by critics Eddie Cockrell and Lynden Barber, commentator Charles Waterstreet and others. The film – based on a book by the South African-born Australian novellist J. M. Coetzee, set in South Africa and made on location there with an international cast – was directed and adapted for the screen by the Australian husband and wife team of Anna Maria Monticelli and Steve Jacobs.
  • Conversely, the 13 AACTA awards, including an acting award presented to Leonardo DiCaprio, received in 2014 by Baz Luhrmann's The Great Gatsby were controversial, due to the film's perceived Americanness. Lurhrmann pointed out that – although the film was financed by a major US film studio and based on a classic US novel of the same name – Gatsby met the criteria of an Australian production.
  • References

    AACTA Awards Wikipedia


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