Girish Mahajan (Editor)

1695

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1695

1695 (MDCXCV) was a common year starting on Saturday (dominical letter B) of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday (dominical letter F) of the Julian calendar, the 1695th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 695th year of the 2nd millennium, the 95th year of the 17th century, and the 6th year of the 1690s decade. As of the start of 1695, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. It was also a particularly cold and wet year. Contemporary records claim that wine froze in the glasses in the Palace of Versailles.

Contents

January–June

  • February 6 – Mustafa II (1695–1703) succeeds Ahmed II as Ottoman Emperor.
  • April – The Parliament of England decides not to renew the Licensing Order of 1643 requiring press censorship.
  • June 24 – Commission of Enquiry into the Massacre of Glencoe in Scotland in 1692 reports to the Parliament of England, blaming Sir John Dalrymple, Secretary of State over Scotland, and declares that a soldier should refuse to obey a "command against the law of nature".
  • July–December

  • July 17 – The Bank of Scotland is founded by an Act of the Parliament of Scotland.
  • August 8 – The Wren Building is started in Williamsburg, Virginia (completed in 1700).
  • August 13–15 – Nine Years' War: Bombardment of Brussels by French troops.
  • September 1 – Nine Years' War: France surrenders Namur in the Spanish Netherlands to forces of the Grand Alliance led by King William III of England following the 2-month Siege of Namur.
  • September 7 – English pirate Henry Every perpetrates one of the most profitable raids in history with the capture of the Grand Mughal ship Ganj-i-Sawai. In response, Emperor Aurangzeb threatens to put an end to all English trading in India.
  • December 31 – A window tax is imposed in England. Some windows are bricked up to avoid it.
  • Date unknown

  • Russia declares war on the Ottoman Empire.
  • English manufacturers call for an embargo on Indian cloth and silk weavers picket the House of Commons of England.
  • A £2 fine is imposed for swearing in England.
  • After 23 years of construction, Spain completes Castillo de San Marcos to protect St. Augustine, Florida, from foreign threats.
  • After many years of construction, the Potala Palace in Lhasa is completed.
  • Gold is discovered in Brazil.
  • In Amsterdam, the bank Wed. Jean Deutz & Sn. floats the first sovereign bonds on the local market. The scheme is designed to fund a 1.5 million guilder loan to the Holy Roman Emperor. From this date on, European leaders commonly take advantage of the low interest rates available in the Dutch Republic and borrow several hundred millions on the Dutch capital market.
  • The Great Famine of 1695–1697 begin in Swedish Estonia and spread across Finland, Latvia, Norway and Sweden.
  • Births

  • February 2 – William Borlase, English naturalist (d. 1772)
  • February 6 – Nicolaus II Bernoulli, Swiss mathematician (d. 1726)
  • March 9 – Martín Sarmiento, Spanish scholar and writer (d.1772)
  • April 8 – Johann Christian Günther, German poet (d. 1723)
  • May 2 – Giovanni Niccolò Servandoni, French architect and painter (d. 1766)
  • May 3 – Henri Pitot, French engineer (d. 1771)
  • June 6 – Adriaan Valckenier, Dutch Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies from 1737 to 1741 (d. 1751)
  • September 3 – Pietro Locatelli, Italian composer (d. 1764)
  • September 5 – Carl Gustaf Tessin, Swedish politician (d. 1770)
  • October 5 – John Glas, Scottish minister (d. 1773)
  • November 10 – John Bevis, English physician and astronomer (d. 1771)
  • date unknown – Hedvig Catharina De la Gardie, Swedish salonniére (d. 1745)
  • Cai Wan, politically influential Chinese poet (d. 1755)
  • Deaths

  • January 4 – François-Henri de Montmorency, duc de Luxembourg, Marshal of France (b. 1628)
  • February 6 – Ahmed II of Turkey (b. 1643)
  • February 18 – Sir William Phips, governor of Massachusetts (b. 1650)
  • March 5 – Henry Wharton, English writer (b. 1664)
  • April 3 – Melchior d'Hondecoeter, Dutch painter (b. c. 1636)
  • April 5 – George Savile, 1st Marquess of Halifax, English writer and statesman (b. 1633)
  • April 13 – Jean de la Fontaine, French writer noted for his fables (b. 1621)
  • April 17 – Sor Juana, Mexican writer (b. c. 1650)
  • April 27 – John Trenchard, English statesman (b. 1640)
  • April 28 – Henry Vaughan, Welsh poet (b. 1621)
  • June 11 – André Félibien, French architect (b. 1619)
  • July 8 – Christiaan Huygens, Dutch mathematician and physicist who developed the wave theory of light (b. 1629)
  • July 18 – Johannes Camphuys, Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies (b. 1634)
  • August 6 – François de Harlay de Champvallon, Archbishop of Paris (b. 1625)
  • August 12 – Huang Zongxi, Chinese political theorist, philosopher, writer, and soldier (b. 1610)
  • September – Thomas Tew, English pirate
  • November 16 – Pierre Nicole, French Jansensist (b. 1625)
  • November 20 – Zumbi, Brazilian leader of a runaway slave colony (b. 1655)
  • November 21 – Henry Purcell, English composer whose works include the opera Dido and Aeneas (b. 1659)
  • November 22 – Francis Nurse, husband of Rebecca Nurse (accused during the Salem Witch Trials of 1692), b. 1618
  • November 28 – Anthony Wood, English antiquarian (b. 1632)
  • November 29 – James Dalrymple, 1st Viscount Stair, Scottish lawyer and statesman (b. 1619)
  • December 8 – Barthélemy d'Herbelot de Molainville, French orientalist (b. 1625)
  • December 12 – Jacob Abendana, British rabbi (b. 1630)
  • References

    1695 Wikipedia


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