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Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Reims

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Country  France
Parishes  76 'new parishes'
Rite  Roman Rite
Founded  750 AD
Phone  +33 3 26 47 05 33
Ecclesiastical province  Reims
Denomination  Roman Catholic
Area  6,931 km²
Patron saint  Saint Remigius
Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Reims
Population - Total - Catholics  (as of 2014) 624,000 (est.) 576,000 (est.) (92.3 (approx.)%)
Address  3 Rue Cardinal de Lorraine, 51100 Reims, France
Similar  Paroisse Notre Dame Sai, Maison diocésaine Saint‑Sixte, Paroisse Saint André, Basilique Saint‑Remi, Fachada Occidental: El angel
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Roman catholic archdiocese of reims


The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Reims (Latin: Archidioecesis Remensis; French: Archidiocèse de Reims) is an archdiocese of the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church in France. Erected as a diocese around 250 by St. Sixtus, the diocese was elevated to an archdiocese around 750. The archbishop received the title "primate of Gallia Belgica" in 1089.

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In 1023, Archbishop Ebles acquired the Countship of Reims, making him a prince-bishop; it became a duchy and a peerage between 1060 and 1170.

The archdiocese comprises the arrondissement of Reims and the département of Ardennes while the province comprises the région of Champagne-Ardenne. The suffragan dioceses in the ecclesiastical province of Reims are Amiens; Beauvais, Noyon, and Senlis; Châlons; Langres; Soissons, Laon, and Saint-Quentin; and Troyes. The archepiscopal see is located in the cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims, where the Kings of France were traditionally crowned. In 2014 it was estimated that there was one priest for every 4,760 Catholics in the diocese.

Pope John Paul II appointed Thierry Romain Camille Jordan as Archbishop of Reims in 1999. On June 28, 2013, Pope Francis appointed Father Bruno Feillet as an Auxiliary Bishop of the Archdiocese of Reims.

Roman catholic archdiocese of reims


History

Reims was taken by the Vandals in 406.

According to Flodoard, on Holy Saturday, 497, Clovis was baptized and anointed by Archbishop Remigius of Reims in the cathedral of Reims.

In 719 the city took up arms against Charles Martel, who besieged the city, took it by assault, and devastated it.

The First Council of Reims took place in 625, under the presidency of Archbishop Sonnatius. It produced at least twenty-five canons.

In 816, Pope Stephen IV crowned Louis the Pious as Emperor at Reims.

On 28 January 893, Charles III "the Simple' was crowned King of West Francia at Reims.

King Robert I was consecrated and crowned 'Rex Francorum' at Saint-Remi in Reims on 29 June 922 by Archbishop Hervée.

Hugh Capet was crowned at Reims on Christmas Day 988, by Archbishop Adalberon. In 990 the city was attacked by Charles of Lorraine, the rival of Hugues Capet, who seized the city and devastated the area.

In 1049, from 3 to 5 October, a Council of the Church took place at Reims under the presidency of Pope Leo IX, with twenty bishops and some fifty abbots in attendance. The Pope was in Reims for the dedication of the church of the monastery of Saint-Rémi, in fulfilment of a promise made to Abbot Herimar.

In 1657, the Chapter of the Cathedral of Reims contained nine dignities and sixty-four Canons. The dignities included: the Major Archdeacon (Archdeacon of Reims), the Minor Archdeacon (Archdeacon of Champagne), the Provost, the Dean, the Cantor, the Treasurer, the Vicedominus, the Scholasticus, and the Poenitentiarius. There were also a number of Collegiate Churches in the diocese, whose clergy were led by Canons: Saint-Symphorien in Reims (a Dean and 20 prebends); Saint-Timothée in Reims (12 prebends); Saint-Côme in Reims (4 prebends); Sainte-Nourrice in Reims (11 prebends); Saint-Pierre aux Dames in Reims (4 prebends); Mézières (a Dean, a Treasurer and 12 prebends); Braux (12 prebends); Montfaucon (a Provost and Canons); and Avenay (6 prebends).

The two archdeacons were already in existence in 877, when they are mentioned at the head of the Capitulations issued by Archbishop Hincmar. They were both appointees of the Archbishop.

In addition to the right to nominate the Archbishop of Reims (since the Concordat of Bologna in 1516), the King enjoyed the right to name the Abbot of Haut-Villiers (O.S.B.), Sainte-Baste (O.S.B.), Mouson (O.S.B.), Saint-Nicaise de Reims (O.S.B.), Saint-Pierre-de-Reims (O.S.B.), Saint-Remi de Reims (O.S.B.), Saint-Thierry lez Reims (O.S.B.), Chery (O.Cist.), Elem (O.Cist.), Igny (O.Cist.), Signy (O.Cist.), Vau-le-Roy (O.Cist.), Saint-Denis-de-Reims (O.S.A.), Esparnay-sur-Marne (O.S.A.), Belle-Val (Praemonst.), Chaumont en Porcien (Praemonst.), Sept Fontaines (Praemonst.), and Vau-Dieu (Praemonst.).

From 1800

  • vacant
  • Jean-Charles de Coucy (1801–1824)
  • Jean-Baptist-Marie-Anne-Antoine de Latil (1824–1839)
  • Thomas-Marie-Joseph Gousset (1840–1866)
  • Jean-Baptiste François Anne Thomas Landriot (1867–1874)
  • Benoit-Marie Langénieux (1874–1905)
  • Louis Luçon (1906–1930)
  • Emmanuel Célestin Suhard (1930–1940)
  • Luigi Agostino Marmottin (1940–1960)
  • Gabriel Auguste François Marty (1960–1968)
  • Émile André Jean-Marie Maury (1968–1972)
  • Jacques Eugène Louis Ménager (1973–1988)
  • Jean Marie Julien Balland (1988–1995)
  • Gérard Denis Auguste Defois (1995–1998)
  • Thierry Jordan (From 1999)
  • Auxiliary bishops

  • Abel de Saint-Brieuc (1483)
  • References

    Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Reims Wikipedia


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