Neha Patil (Editor)

Lone Star Conference

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Covid-19
Established  1931
Division  Division II
Association  NCAA
Members  11
Lone Star Conference
Sports fielded  17 (men's: 8; women's: 9)
Region  Southwestern United States

The Lone Star Conference (LSC) is a collegiate athletic conference affiliated with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II level. Member institutions are located in the southwestern United States, with schools in Texas, Oklahoma and New Mexico.

Contents

The conference was formed in 1931 when five schools withdrew from the old Texas Intercollegiate Athletic Association. Charter members included East Texas State (now Texas A&M–Commerce), North Texas State (now North Texas), Sam Houston State, Southwest Texas State (now Texas State), and Stephen F. Austin. Among the five charter members, only Texas A&M–Commerce remains in Division II and in the conference – the other four charter members moved up to Division I (in football, North Texas and Texas State compete in NCAA Division I FBS, while Stephen F. Austin and Sam Houston compete in NCAA Division I FCS).

The Lone Star Conference shares operates from the same headquarters complex in the Dallas suburb of Richardson as the American Southwest Conference.

Current members

  • Texas Woman's — predominantly a women's institution (though officially co-ed), does not field men's sports.
  • Former members

  • Harding — track & field indoor (M / W) and track & field outdoor (M / W) was an affiliate member from 2012–2015.
  • McMurry — football was an affiliate member in 1972–73 and in 2014–15; track & field indoor (M / W) and track & field outdoor (M / W) was an affiliate member in 2013–14.
  • Membership timeline

     Full member (all sports)   Full member (non-football)   Associate member (football-only)   Associate member (sport) 

    Membership evolution

    Below is a timeline of the Conference's history.

  • 1931 - The conference was formed on April 25, 1931 at a meeting in Denton, Texas; when five schools withdrew from the old Texas Intercollegiate Athletic Association. Charter members included East Texas State University (now Texas A&M University–Commerce), North Texas State University (now North Texas), Sam Houston State College (now Sam Houston State University), Southwestern State College (later Southwest Texas State University, then Texas State University–San Marcos, now Texas State University), and Stephen F. Austin State College (now Stephen F. Austin State University). The conference constitution required member schools to sponsor football, basketball, track & field and tennis. The 1931-32 basketball season was the first sport to be competed within the conference. At the first annual conference business meeting on December 12, 1931, Trinity University was admitted to the LSC, effectively for the 1932-33 academic year.
  • 1933 - Trinity University announced that the school was withdrawing from the LSC to return to the Texas Conference, but would still compete in the LSC until the 1933-34 academic year.
  • 1934 - At the annual LSC business meeting in December, conference presidents considered Texas A&I University (now Texas A&M University–Kingsville), Sul Ross State University and West Texas State Teachers College (then West Texas State University, now West Texas A&M University) for admittance, but full membership was not granted at that time.
  • 1938 - The Lone Star Conference joined the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).
  • 1940 - The LSC Faculty Athletics Representatives voted, upon recommendation of the LSC Directors of Athletics, to add golf as a conference sport with the first championship scheduled for May 17, 1941 (of the 1940-41 academic year).
  • 1941 - At the annual meeting on December 13, 1941, six days after the beginning of World War II, LSC members went on record as favoring "continuing a full sports program as long as it does not interfere with the nation's all-out war effort".
  • 1942 - At the December 12, 1942 conference meeting, the LSC Faculty Athletics Representatives approved football and basketball as conference sports during the war as long as transportation was available. All spring sports, excluding track, were discontinued.
  • 1945 - On November 9, 1945, and with the end of World War II, a called meeting of conference directors of athletics and faculty athletics representatives was held in Waco, Texas. Basketball, tennis, track, golf and football were planned as conference sports for the 1946-47 academic year. An invitation for conference membership was extended to the University of Houston and Southwestern University of Georgetown, Texas. Houston expressed a desire to schedule tentative basketball and football schedules, pending action to its board of regents. In addition, Trinity University and Howard Payne University were also discussed as possible new members.
  • 1945 - On December 8, 1945, the University of Houston was officially admitted to the LSC.
  • 1946 - On April 23, 1946, at a conference spring meeting, Trinity University was admitted to the LSC, effectively in the 1946-47 academic year; therefore, re-joining the conference after a 12-year hiatus.
  • 1946 - On December 7, 1946, at a conference winter meeting, a vote was taken to add baseball to the list of LSC sports, effectively in the 1947 spring season.
  • 1947 - On May 16, 1947, Texas A&I University (now Texas A&M University–Kingsville) applied for admission to the LSC, but was never admitted due to some geographic concerns.
  • 1948 - On December 10–11, 1948, at a winter meeting, Hardin College (now Midwestern State University) was admitted to the LSC by unanimous vote.
  • 1949 - North Texas State University, the University of Houston, Trinity University and Hardin College withdrew from the LSC, effective June 1, 1949, to form the Gulf Coast Conference.
  • 1950 - Sul Ross State University and Lamar State College of Technology (now Lamar University) were admitted to the LSC.
  • 1953 - On December 12, 1953, Texas A&I University (now Texas A&M University–Kingsville) was admitted to the LSC and began competition in the 1954 fall season of the 1954-55 academic year.
  • 1956 - McMurry College (now McMurry University) applied for LSC membership, but was voted down.
  • 1958 - Conference members approved a motion that the LSC must follow NCAA rules for football instead of NAIA rules.
  • 1959 - On May 12, 1959, the LSC Faculty Athletics Representatives rejected a motion that the LSC should be expanded to a nine-school league with the votes 6-2.
  • 1960 - The conference members voted to accept an invitation by the new Great Southwest Bowl committee to have the LSC football champion as the host team each year for the game in Grand Prairie, Texas in late December. Texas A&I defeated Arkansas Tech University 45-10 in the first such game on December 31, 1960. Bowl Chairman Cecil Owens said, "We hope the game will be a fine supplement to the Cotton Bowl".
  • 1962 - On December 7, 1962, at the annual conference meeting in Dallas, Texas, the LSC Faculty Athletics Representatives rejected a motion to allow LSC members optional membership in the NAIA or the NCAA; and rejected a motion that the decision of acceptance or refusal of post-season, playoff or championship events resided within the individual schools. A motion that LSC did not pledge its champions to the NAIA playoffs was also defeated
  • 1963 - On May 11, 1963, at the annual conference meeting in Brownwood, Texas, Lamar State College of Technology withdrew from the LSC, effective September 1, 1965.
  • 1964 - On May 9, 1964, McMurry College was admitted to the LSC with first participation scheduled for spring sports in the 1965 spring season of the 1964-65 academic year; followed by basketball (achieving full member status) in the 1965-66 academic year; and eventually football in the 1966 fall season of the 1966-67 academic year.
  • 1964 - Also in 1964, San Angelo College (now Angelo State University) attempted to apply to the LSC, but was told that LSC membership is limited to schools which had recognized four-year collegiate standing. San Angelo College's president Dr. B.M. Cavness told the LSC Faculty Athletics Representatives that his school would assume such status in September 1965. He was advised to re-apply in December 1965.
  • 1965 - At the annual fall meeting in Dallas, the LSC Faculty Athletics Representatives voted in a secret ballot not to expand membership in the LSC.
  • 1968 - After achieving the status requirements since the first attempt, Angelo State University (formerly San Angelo College) was finally admitted to the LSC. Tarleton State University was also admitted to the LSC.
  • 1972 - McMurry College left the LSC.
  • 1973 - Abilene Christian University was admitted to the LSC.
  • 1975 - Tarleton State University withdrew from the LSC.
  • 1982 - The Lone Star Conference became an NCAA Division II athletic conference.
  • 1983 - Southwest Texas State University, Sam Houston State University and Stephen F. Austin University left the LSC.
  • 1984 - The LSC Council of Presidents extended an invitation for LSC membership to West Texas State University (now West Texas A&M University), and the WTSU Board of Regents accepted invitation to begin LSC competition in the 1986-87 academic year. Eastern New Mexico University was automatically admitted to the LSC.
  • 1986 - The LSC Council of Presidents unanimously approved the membership of Central State University (now the University of Central Oklahoma) to establish the concept of a regional conference. Eventually, the school officially became a member of the LSC on July 1, 1987; effectively beginning competition within the conference in the 1987-88 academic year.
  • 1988 - The LSC Council of Presidents approved the admittance of Texas Woman's University to the LSC; effectively in the 1989-90 academic year. Cameron University was automatically admitted to the LSC.
  • 1989 - The LSC entered into consulting agreement with the Southwest Conference, allowing the SWC to advise the LSC in eligibility cases, aid in arbitration of protests, and provide interpretations of NCAA rules as well as administer the National Letter of Intent program. At the time, Shirley Morton of Angelo State University served as Secretary/Treasurer and Garner Roberts of Abilene Christian University as News Director of the LSC.
  • 1989 - West Texas State University dropped football and withdrew from the LSC, effectively at the end of the 1989-90 academic year.
  • 1990 - On November 30, 1990, the LSC Council of Presidents requested an LSC Expansion Committee to be formed to contact institutions in Oklahoma and Arkansas regarding conference membership.
  • 1991 - On April 28, 1991, the LSC Directors of Athletics considered a new football schedule recommendation from football coaches for the 1992 season if a replacement for West Texas State was not found.
  • 1991 - On April 30, 1991, the LSC Expansion Committee appointed to include Jerry Vandergriff of Angelo State, John "Skip" Wagnon of Central Oklahoma, Cecil Eager of Abilene Christian, and Dr. Margaret Harbison of East Texas State.
  • 1991 - On June 1, 1991, at the LSC Council of Presidents meeting, Angelo State president Dr. Drew Vincent said "there is a survival issue in the conference that has nothing to do with finances which was that the conference needed to be enlarged. East Central University, Southwestern Oklahoma State University and Northeastern State University might be interested in joining as well as Tarleton State University and Midwestern State University.
  • 1991 - On November 25, 1991, the LSC Directors of Athletics requested Central Oklahoma's John "Skip" Wagnon to invite representatives from Henderson State University, the University of Central Arkansas, Fort Hays State University and Midwestern State University to a meeting on January 7, 1992, during the NCAA Convention.
  • 1992 - On November 24, 1992, the LSC Faculty Athletics Representatives voted unanimously to recommend the Council of Presidents that an invitation should be extended to West Texas State University (who had re-instated back football), to re-join the conference.
  • 1993 - On January 14, 1993, the LSC Council of Presidents voted unanimously to extend an invitation to West Texas State University, having the school to begin LSC competition for football in the 1996 fall season of the 1996-97 academic year, and to begin LSC competition for all other sports, effectively in the 1994-95 academic year.
  • 1993 - On June 19, 1993, the LSC Council of Presidents accepted the withdraw of Cameron University from the LSC, effectively in the 1993 fall season of the 1993-94 academic year, following Cameron's decision to discontinue football.
  • 1994 - On January 9, 1994, the LSC Council of Presidents voted unanimously to extend an invitation to Tarleton State University to join the LSC and compete in all sports except football for the 1994-95 academic year if possible.
  • 1994 - On May 2, 1994, the LSC Faculty Athletics Representatives announced that the Southwest Conference could no longer provide services to the Lone Star Conference that was recommended a Conference Office to be established and a Commissioner to be hired.
  • 1994 - On June 11, 1994, the Council of Presidents voted unanimously to establish an LSC Office and to hire a Commissioner.
  • 1994 - On September 5, 1994, Fred Jacoby was named the first full-time Commissioner of the Lone Star Conference with the charge to expand the conference, to assist the new members in NAIA to NCAA transition, and to train a person for Commissioner in establishing a Conference Office.
  • 1994 - On October 10, 1994, Ouachita Baptist University president Ben Elrod said that his university would join Harding University in applying for LSC membership.
  • 1995 - On January 5, 1995, on a conference call of the LSC Council of Presidents, Midwestern State University was admitted to the LSC in a unanimous vote of 8-0, effective September 1, 1995, therefore re-joining the conference. Only six members competed in football (Eastern New Mexico, Abilene Christian, Angelo State, Texas A&M–Commerce [formerly East Texas State], Texas A&M–Kingsville [formerly Texas A&I] and Central Oklahoma).
  • 1995 - On January 8, 1995, at a joint meeting of the LSC Council of Presidents and the LSC Directors of Athletics at the NCAA Convention in San Diego, California, a thorough discussion of conference expansion was held with the potential of developing two divisions of eight members each. The catalyst had been the fragmentation of NAIA Division I with member institutions moving to NCAA Division II. Discussion centered on universities in Oklahoma and Arkansas that had applied to NCAA Division II and the rationale for expansion. The consensus was that the LSC presidents should host a meeting of Oklahoma presidents to share information on expansion and to study the feasibility of developing a regional conference. A meeting would be set up in the next 60 days.
  • 1995 - On August 29, 1995, on a conference call of the Executive Committee of the LSC Council of Presidents, a recommendation was approved to "take a proactive position regarding expansion with the development of a regional conference with two divisions".
  • 1995 - On September 28, 1995, the Executive Committee of the LSC Council of Presidents met with the presidents of Northeastern State University, Southeastern Oklahoma State University, the University of Central Arkansas, Harding University and Ouachita Baptist University. Focus of discussion was that with expansion, a strategic long range decision would be made to stabilize LSC membership, while providing flexibility for conference athletics programs in scheduling, postseason playoff competition, gender equity guidelines, marketing potential, media coverage, NCAA legislative strength, enhance image of the conference, and economy of scale for the conference administration and services. Further, there was a minimal downside to the proposed expansion/realignment.
  • 1995 - On October 11, 1995, on a conference call of the LSC Council of Presidents, a recommendation was unanimously approved to extend invitations to Northeastern State University, Southeastern Oklahoma State University, the University of Central Arkansas, Harding University, and Ouachita Baptist University for LSC membership. On November 14, 1995, all institutions listed above (except Central Arkansas) accepted membership in the LSC, effectively in the 1996-97 academic year.
  • 1996 - On March 6, 1996, Cameron University was re-admitted to the LSC, after a two-year hiatus.
  • 1996 - Southwestern Oklahoma State University and East Central University were admitted to the LSC. With 17 members, the Lone Star Conference began competition with a North/South divisional alignment.
  • 2000 - Harding University and Ouachita Baptist University withdrew from the LSC to join the Gulf South Conference.
  • 2010 - The University of the Incarnate Word was admitted to the LSC.
  • 2011 - East Central University, Southeastern Oklahoma State University and Southwestern Oklahoma State University left the LSC to join with a few Arkansas schools to form the Great American Conference; while the University of Central Oklahoma and Northeastern State University left to join the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association.
  • 2013 - The University of the Incarnate Word and Abilene Christian University left the LSC to join the Southland Conference of NCAA Division I. Abilene Christian was formerly a member of that conference from 1963-64 to 1972-73.
  • Other sponsored sports by school

  • — D-I sport
  • Football Championships

    This is a list of conference champions from the conference since 1997.

    2014-present

    In the 2014 season a conference playoff was added due to the small number of football programs in the conference. At the end of the season the teams were guaranteed two more conference games in the Lone Star Conference playoffs, the teams were split into two separate brackets, the championship bracket (seeds 1-4) and the non-championship bracket (seeds 5-7).

    Other Champions

    This is a list of conference champions since 1997.

    Notable athletes

    Abilene Christian University

  • James Browne, Olympic long jumper from Antigua
  • Danieal Manning, NFL safety and kickoff returner
  • Bobby Morrow, sprinter, won gold medals in the 100 meters, 200, and 4 × 100 meters relay at the 1956 Summer Olympics
  • Wilbert Montgomery, former NFL running back and current running backs coach of the Baltimore Ravens
  • Billy Olson, pole vaulter, set 11 indoor world records in the 1980s and was the first to clear 19 feet indoors
  • John "Bradshaw" Layfield, two time All-Lone Star Conference lineman & former WWE Champion
  • Ove Johansson, Swedish-born NFL placekicker, world-record holder for the longest field goal in organized football (69 yards)
  • Bernard Scott, NFL running back for the Cincinnati Bengals
  • Johnny Knox, NFL wide receiver for the Chicago Bears
  • Earl Young, sprinter, won gold medal in the 4 × 400 meters relay at the 1960 Summer Olympics
  • Angelo State University

  • Alvin Garrett, former NFL wide receiver
  • Tranel Hawkins, hurdler, placed 6th in the 400 meters hurdles at the 1984 Summer Olympics
  • Pierce Holt, former Pro Bowl NFL defensive end
  • Jim Morris, former relief pitcher for the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, inspiration for the film The Rookie
  • Grant Teaff, College Football Hall of Fame coach, coached 21 seasons at Baylor
  • Clayton Weishuhn, former NFL linebacker
  • Charlie West, former NFL safety
  • Cameron University

  • Jason Christiansen, former Major League Baseball pitcher
  • John Brandes, former NFL tight end and long snapper
  • Mark Cotney, former NFL safety
  • Avery Johnson, former NBA point guard and former Brooklyn Nets head coach
  • University of Central Oklahoma

  • Keith Traylor, former NFL nose tackle
  • Eastern New Mexico University

  • Mike Sinclair, former Pro Bowl NFL defensive end, current Chicago Bears defensive line coach
  • Midwestern State University

  • Marqui Christian, current NFL strong safety for the Los Angeles Rams.
  • Dominic Rhodes, former NFL running back, current running back for the Virginia Destroyers of the United Football League
  • Amini Silatolu, NFL guard for the Carolina Panthers
  • Bryan Gilmore, former NFL wide receiver
  • Will Pettis, former Arena Football League wide receiver and defensive back, two-time AFL Ironman of the Year
  • Daniel Woolard, Major League Soccer defender for D.C. United
  • Tarleton State University

  • Richard Bartel, NFL quarterback for the Arizona Cardinals
  • James Dearth, former NFL long snapper and tight end
  • Brandon Lee, American Basketball Association point guard/shooting guard for the North Dallas Vandals
  • Derrick Ross, former NFL running back, current Arena Football League running back for the Philadelphia Soul
  • TAMU–Commerce

  • Wade Wilson, former NFL quarterback and current NFL quarterbacks coach for the Dallas Cowboys
  • Harvey Martin, former All-Pro NFL defensive end and member of the NFL 1970s All-Decade Team
  • Dwight White, former Pro Bowl NFL defensive end and member of the Pittsburgh Steelers' Steel Curtain defensive line
  • Kevin Mathis, former NFL cornerback
  • Derrick Crawford, former Arena Football League defensive lineman
  • TAMU–Kingsville

  • Roberto Garza, NFL center/guard for the Chicago Bears
  • Darrell Green, former Hall of Fame NFL cornerback who played a record 20 seasons with the Washington Redskins
  • Al Harris, former All-Pro NFL cornerback
  • Jermaine Mayberry, former NFL offensive tackle/guard
  • Gene Upshaw, former Hall of Fame NFL guard and longtime executive director of the NFLPA
  • Dwayne Nix, football tight end, member of the College Football Hall of Fame
  • Texas Woman's University

  • Louise Ritter (B.S. 1982), high jumper, won gold medal in the high jump at the 1988 Summer Olympics
  • West Texas A&M University

  • John Ayers, former NFL All-Pro offensive lineman, 2 Super Bowl rings
  • Carl Birdsong, former NFL Pro Bowl punter
  • Maurice Cheeks, former NBA All-Star point guard, 1 NBA Championship, former 76ers head coach, current Oklahoma City Thunder assistant coach
  • Brittan Golden, NFL receiver
  • Alondra Johnson, former All-Star CFL linebacker and member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame
  • Steve Kragthorpe, former quarterback and college football head coach, current quarterbacks coach for LSU
  • Jerry Logan, former Pro Bowl NFL safety, 1 Super Bowl ring
  • Reggie McElroy, former NFL offensive lineman.
  • Mercury Morris, former All-Pro NFL running back, 3X Pro Bowl, 2 Super Bowl rings
  • Kareem Larrimore, former NFL and Arena Football League defensive back
  • Duane Thomas, former NFL running back, 1 Super Bowl ring
  • Chaun Thompson, former NFL linebacker
  • Keith Null, free agent NFL quarterback
  • Khiry Robinson, NFL running back for the New Orleans Saints
  • References

    Lone Star Conference Wikipedia


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