Trisha Shetty (Editor)

Lake Rotomahana

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Location  North Island
Basin countries  New Zealand
Max. width  2.8 km (1.7 mi)
Surface elevation  337 m
Length  6.2 km
Width  2.8 km
Primary outflows  none
Max. length  6.2 km (3.9 mi)
Surface area  8.0 km (3.1 sq mi)
Area  8 kmĀ²
Mean depth  51 m
Lake type  Crater lake
Lake Rotomahana httpsuploadwikimediaorgwikipediacommonsthu

Lake Rotomahana is an 800-hectare (2,000-acre) lake in northern New Zealand, located 20 kilometres to the south-east of Rotorua. It is immediately south-west of the dormant volcano Mount Tarawera, and its geography was substantially altered by a major 1886 eruption of Mount Tarawera. Along with the mountain, it lies within the Okataina caldera.

Contents

Map of Lake Rotomahana, Rerewhakaaitu 3073, New Zealand

Before the 1886 eruption, only two small lakes were present in the current lake's basin. Following the eruption, a number of craters filled over the course of 15 years to form today's Lake Rotomahana. It is the most recently formed larger natural lake in New Zealand, and the deepest in the Rotorua district. The lake's northern shore lies close to the 39 metres (128 ft) lower Lake Tarawera, separated by less than 700 metres (2,300 ft) of terrain that is mostly material from the 1886 eruption. Lake Rotomahana has no natural outlet, and its water level varies by about one meter in response to rainfall and evaporation.

The lake is a wildlife refuge, with all hunting of birds prohibited. A healthy population of black swan inhabits the lake, and there are efforts underway to ensure the lake's largest island, Patiti Island, is kept pest-free. There is no public access to the lake.

A boat cruise on the lake, visiting hydrothermal features on the lake's shore, is available as an additional extra from the Waimangu Volcanic Valley tourism operation.

Pink and White Terraces

The Pink and White Terraces were a natural wonder on the shores of the lake before the 1886 eruption. They were considered to be the eighth wonder of the natural world and were New Zealand's most famous tourist attraction during the mid 19th century, but were buried or destroyed by the eruption.

Scientists rediscovered the lower tiers of the Pink and White Terraces on the lake bed at a depth of 60 metres (200 ft) in 2011.

References

Lake Rotomahana Wikipedia


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