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Centre for Advanced Study at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters

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Centre for Advanced Study at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters

Centre for Advanced Study (CAS) at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (Senter for grunnforskning) is an independent research centre in Oslo.

Contents

Each year, three international and interdisciplinary research groups come to CAS for up to twelve months. Researchers from a range of different countries work on a project in groups, across disciplines. The Centre is the only one of its kind in Norway.

CAS was established by the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters in 1989, and has hosted more than 1000 outstanding researchers from across the world since its opening in 1992.

About the Centre

CAS is an independent foundation led by a board appointed by the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, The Norwegian Association of Higher Education Institutions, and The Research Council of Norway (NFR).

The rationale for the existence of the Centre for Advanced Study is to engender scholarly excellence of an international standard by offering researchers one year free from other obligations to enable them to carry out research in an international and interdisciplinary environment.

Three groups are in residence at CAS each year, from the fields of:

  • Humanities/Theology
  • Social sciences/Law
  • Natural sciences/Medicine/Mathematics
  • Each group has some members whose affiliation to CAS is for the whole academic year, and several who participate in the research groups for shorter periods of time.

    The groups are also expected to include one or two PhD candidates, which is regarded as a vital part of communicating and passing on the importance of research to future generations.

    Each year, forty to forty-five researchers of ten to fifteen nationalities participate in the research projects at CAS.

    The CAS administration team facilitates in the planning and execution of conferences; it also offers help with technical equipment, library services, and organises a sociable daily lunch. The administration team also runs the website to inform the wider public about the Centre and its research.

    CAS is now on Facebook and Twitter, and PodCAS is available to download in iTunes and on Soundcloud.

    Comprehensive application process

    Following a thorough application process, the board selects outstanding researchers from Norwegian universities to lead groups of international academics for a one-year residency. Three groups are in residence at CAS each year, from the fields of:

  • Humanities/Theology
  • Social sciences/Law
  • Natural sciences/Medicine/Mathematics
  • The process of selecting new projects starts three years in advance. The project proposals go through a thorough evaluation process, including international peer review, before three research groups are selected two years in advance of their start date.

    Partner institutions

    Agreements between CAS and its partner institutions ensure that the year spent at CAS is counted as an extra sabbatical year for each group leader. This is also the case for academics connected to partner institutions, who are invited by a group leader to join the research group.

    The partner institutions are:

  • The University of Stavanger
  • The University of Bergen
  • The University of Tromsø
  • The Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim
  • The Norwegian University of Life Sciences in Ås
  • The University of Agder
  • The Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration in Bergen
  • BI Norwegian Business School in Oslo
  • History

    CAS leases premises from the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters at Drammensveien 78, Oslo.

    Deliberations about a Norwegian Centre for Advanced Study began in 1986 when the renowned sociologist and Norway's then Minister of Church and Education, Gudmund Hernes, wrote a feature article in the Norwegian daily newspaper Dagbladet arguing that Norway needed such a facility.

    Inspired by et al. The Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, the Senter for høyere studier was established as a foundation; it was officially opened on September 1, 1992. Gudmund Hernes was Director of the board until he became Minister of Church Affairs, Education and Research in Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland’s third cabinet.

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, the NWO Spinoza Prize, John Desmond Bernal Prize of the Society for Social Studies of Science, The Kavli Prize and Fridtjof Nansen medal for Outstanding Research are some of the honours to researchers with affiliation to CAS.

    Chair of the CAS Board

  • Professor Gudmund Hernes (1989 – 1990)
  • Professor Dagfinn Føllesdal (1991)
  • Professor Vigdis Ystad (1992 – 1994)
  • Professor Torstein Jøssang (1994 –1999)
  • Professor Aanund Hylland (2000 – 2010)
  • Professor Asbjørn Kjønstad (2011 – 2014)
  • Professor Geir Ellingsrud (2014 – )
  • Scientific Director at CAS

  • Professor Torstein Jøssang (1994 – 1999)
  • Professor Ole-Jørgen Skog (1999 – 2003)
  • Professor Willy Østreng (2003 – 2009)
  • Professor Gro Steinsland (2009 – 2012)
  • Professor Brit Solli (2012 – 2014)
  • Professor Vigdis Broch-Due (2015 – )
  • References

    Centre for Advanced Study at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters Wikipedia


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