Rahul Sharma (Editor)

Today's FBI

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6.1/10 TV

Genre  Crime drama
Opening theme  Elmer Bernstein
Final episode date  26 April 1982
Number of episodes  18
6.9/10 IMDb

Also known as  Today's F.B.I.
Written by  Rogers Turrentine
First episode date  25 October 1981
Number of seasons  1
Today's FBI httpsimagesnasslimagesamazoncomimagesMM
Directed by  Harvey S. Laidman Stan Jolley Virgil W. Vogel
Starring  Mike Connors Carol Potter Johnny Seven Rick Hill Harold Sylvester Joseph Cali
Network  American Broadcasting Company
Cast  Mike Connors, Carol Potter, Harold Sylvester, Joseph Cali, Johnny Seven
Similar  The FBI, Riptide, McClain's Law, Houston Knights, T J Hooker

Today's FBI is an American crime drama television series, an updated and revamped version of the earlier series The F.B.I.

Contents

Like the original program, this series is based on actual cases from the files of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the F.B.I. was involved in the making of the show. Unlike the original series, which ran for nine seasons, this show ran for only 18 episodes (following a TV-movie pilot) on ABC, during the 1981–82 season.

Cast

  • Mike Connors as Ben Slater, a veteran "G-Man" who is the chief and mentor of an elite unit of agents.
  • Joseph Cali as Nick Frazier, the one "ethnic" member of the team, a young and determined agent.
  • Carol Potter as Maggie Clinton, the one female member.
  • Rick Hill as Al Gordean, a "country boy" and strongman of the group, is often partnered with Nick.
  • Harold Sylvester as Dwayne Thompson, the one African American on the show, often acts as the member who keeps the others focused.
  • Reception

    According to Michele Malach of Fort Lewis College, the series attempted a more positive portrayal of the FBI by using diverse characters and a "fallacious assumption that its audience still viewed special agents as 'us' rather than 'them'," in contrast to federal agents with "a rigid, dogmatic, inhumane bureaucracy" depicted in later media, like Point Break, Betrayed, and The X-Files. Viewers "did not buy either the image or [the series]," prompting a cancellation. Richard Gib Powers called it "pointless and a cover-up [of] the FBI villany[.]"

    References

    Today's FBI Wikipedia


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