Siddhesh Joshi (Editor)

The Man from ORGY

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Director  James Hill
Music by  Charles Bernstein
Produced by  Sidney W. Pink
Country  United States
4.2/10 IMDb

Genre  Comedy, Crime
Cinematography  Jose F. Aguayo
Duration  
Language  English
The Man from O.R.G.Y. wwwgstaticcomtvthumbmovieposters35522p35522
Release date  April 3, 1970 (1970-04-03) (New York City, New York)
Based on  The Man from O.R.G.Y.   by Ted Mark
Writer  Ted Mark (novel), Ted Mark (screenplay)
Cast  Louisa Moritz, Steve Rossi, Slappy White, Robert Walker - Jr, Mimi Dillard
Similar movies  Spy Chasers (1955)

The Man from O.R.G.Y. (also known as The Real Gone Girls) is a 1970 film starring Robert Walker Jr., Louisa Moritz, Slappy White, Lynne Carter and Steve Rossi. It was directed by British filmmaker James Hill. It was filmed in Puerto Rico and New York City, New York. The film is a comedy within the genres of espionage and sex.

Contents

Overall the film did not receive a positive reception, and a reviewer for The New York Times commented: "A certain charming innocence pertains to all the low-level vulgarity, as it does to the plump, often pretty girls themselves, with their piled-up hairdo's, their freighted eyelids, and their brave little attempts to say their lines."

Plot summary

Protagonist Steve Victor (Robert Walker Jr.) is a spy and scientific investigator for the group Organization for the Rational Guidance of Youth (O.R.G.Y.). Victor is given a mission to determine the location of three prostitutes that are due US$15 million from their deceased female manager. Victor starts off the trail only knowing that the three women each have a tattoo on their buttocks of a gopher grinning. He is stymied in his efforts by hired assassins Luigi (Steve Rossi) and Vito (Slappy White). Luigi and Vito have an interest in the investigation because they provided financing for the burlesque business. Another prostitute Gina (Louisa Moritz) states her lack of interest in her owed portion of the monies as she does not wish her wealthy spouse to find out about her activities. Gina tells Victor some clues about how to locate the other two women, although Victor later discovers they are both deceased. Gina had murdered them for in actuality she wants the money. She kills Vito by thrusting a knife into him as he is planning on murdering Victor. Gina turns to kill Victor, but he first shoots the woman and she dies after falling from a window.

Source material

The Man from O.R.G.Y. was originally a paperback book by Ted Mark, the pen name of Theodore "Ted" Mark Gottfried. The first seven books in The Man from O.R.G.Y series were published by Lancer Books.

Ted Marks' The Man from O.R.G.Y. series

  • The Man from O.R.G.Y. (Lancer Books, 1966)
  • The Real Gone Girls (Lancer Books, 1966)
  • Dr. Nyet (Lancer Books, 1966)
  • My Son, The Double Agent (Lancer Books, 1966)
  • A Hard Day's Knight (Lancer Books, 1966)
  • Room at the Topless (Lancer Books, 1967)
  • The 9-Month Caper (Lancer Books, 1967)
  • Back Home at the O.R.G.Y. (Berkley Books, 1968)
  • Here's Your O.R.G.Y. (Berkley Books, 1970)
  • Around the World is Not a Trip (Dell Publishing, 1973)
  • Dial "O" for O.R.G.Y. (Dell, 1973)
  • Beauty and the Bug (Dell, 1975)
  • The Girls from O.R.G.Y. (Manor Books, 1975)
  • The Man from O.R.G.Y.: Thy Neighbor's Orgy (Zebra Books, 1981)
  • The Tight End (Zebra Books, 1981)
  • Casting

    Louisa Moritz made her feature film debut in The Man from O.R.G.Y. Lynne Carter portrayed the female proprietor of the prostitution establishment in the film; he appeared in drag. His character imitated celebrities including Tallulah Bankhead, Bette Davis, Marlene Dietrich and Hermione Gingold.

    Marketing

    The production company marketed the film with the slogan: "Meet Steve Victor, a new breed of agent. He stands up for what he believes in ... SEX!"

    Reception

    Overall at the time period after the film's release it did not get a positive reception. A reviewer for The New York Times commented: "A certain charming innocence pertains to all the low-level vulgarity, as it does to the plump, often pretty girls themselves, with their piled-up hairdo's, their freighted eyelids, and their brave little attempts to say their lines." This poor reception had a negative impact on the film-writing career of Ted Mark. British Film Culture in the 1970s described the film as a sex parody piece.

    References

    The Man from O.R.G.Y. Wikipedia
    The Man from O.R.G.Y. IMDb


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