Girish Mahajan (Editor)

Tel Zayit

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Tel Zayit Analysis of the Zayit Stone Inscriptions amp BASOR 34439s Presentation

Tel Zayit (Hebrew: תל זית‎‎, Arabic: Tell Zeita, Kirbat Zeita al Kharab‎‎) is an archaeological tell in the Shephelah, or lowlands, of Israel. It may have been the site of the biblical city of Libnah (Joshua 10:32, 2 Kings 19:8) or Ziklag (1 Samuel 27:6).

Tel Zayit NOVA The Bible39s Buried Secrets Origins of the Written Bible

History

Tel Zayit Yuval Nadel Photagraphy Archaeology

The site, roughly 0.8-acre (3,200 m2), shows evidence of human settlement throughout the Late Bronze Age, and Iron Age I and II. The city was destroyed by fire twice, in 1200 BCE and the ninth century BCE. Hazael of Aram may have been the military leader who ordered the destruction of the city in the ninth century. The Aramean's siege tactics are known from the Zakkur stele, and the Hebrew Bible records that Hazael devastated cities in the Shephelah during the ninth century, including Philistine Gath. The similar siege and destruction of Tell es-Safi (Gath) in the ninth century, a nearby site usually identified as Gath, has been cited by archaeologists there as possible evidence of Hazael's campaign.

Tel Zayit digsbibarchorgimagestelzayitjpg

From at least the 16th century until some time during the 20th century, the site was occupied by the Arab village Zayta. During the period of the British mandate, the village moved 1.5 km to the north, until it was depopulated in 1948.

Tel Zayit The Tel Zayit Abecedary 10th Century BC Bible Apocrypha texts

Work at Tel Zayit began with a preliminary survey in 1998 by a Pittsburgh Theological Seminary team led by Ron Tappy.

Tel Zayit The Jewish Chronicle With an eye on small town life archaeologist

During the 2005 season, archaeologists discovered the Zayit Stone among the ruins of a fire dating to the tenth century BC. The stone includes an inscription identified by some scholars as an abecedary, among the oldest ever discovered.

Tel Zayit Rapport archo

References

Tel Zayit Wikipedia


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