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Mir Castle Complex

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Location  Belarus
Criteria  ii, iv
Phone  +375 1596 28-270
Type  Cultural
Reference  625
UNESCO World Heritage Site inscription  2000
Mir Castle Complex
UNESCO region  Europe and North America
Address  Čyrvonaarmiejskaja vulica 2, Mir 231444, Belarus
Hours  Closed now Monday10AM–6PMTuesday10AM–6PMWednesday10AM–6PMThursday10AM–6PMFriday10AM–6PMSaturday10AM–6PMSunday10AM–6PM
Similar  Nesvizh Castle, Lida Castle, Białowieża Forest, Corpus Christi Church, Historyczno‑kulturalny kompleks "Linia Sta
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The Mirsky Castle Complex (Belarusian: Мірскі замак, Polish: Zamek w Mirze) is a UNESCO World Heritage site in Belarus. It is in the town of Mir, in the Karelichy District of the Hrodna voblast, at 53°27′4.46″N 26°28′22.80″E, 29 kilometres (18 mi) north-west of another World Heritage site, Nesvizh Castle. Mir Castle Complex is 164 metres (538 ft) above sea level.[1]

Contents

From 1921 to 1939 the castle belonged to the territory of Poland.

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History

Duke Yuri Ivanovich Ilyinich (pl:Jerzy Iwanowicz Ilinicz) began construction of the castle near the village of Mir after the turn of the 16th century in the Belarusian Gothic style. Five towers surrounded the courtyard of the citadel, the walls of which formed a square of 75 metres (246 ft) on each side. In 1568, when the Ilyinich dynasty died out, the Mir Castle passed into the hands of Mikołaj Krzysztof "the Orphan" Radziwiłł, who refitted it with a two-winged, three-story stately residence along the eastern and northern inner walls of the castle. Plastered facades were decorated with limestone portals, plates, balconies and porches in the Renaissance style.

In 1817, after the castle had been abandoned for nearly a century and had suffered severe damage in the Battle of Mir (1812), owner Dominik Hieronim Radziwiłł died of battle injuries and the castle passed to his daughter Stefania, who married Ludwig zu Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg. Later the castle became a possession of their daughter Maria, who married Prince Chlodwig Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst.

Their son, Maurice Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst, sold the castle to Nikolai Svyatopolk-Mirsky, of the Bialynia clan, in 1895. Nikolai's son Mikhail began to rebuild the castle according to the plans of architect Teodor Bursze. The Svyatopolk-Mirsky family owned the castle until 1939, when the Soviet Union occupied eastern Poland.

When German forces invaded the Soviet Union in 1941, they occupied the castle and converted it to a ghetto for the local Jewish population, prior to their liquidation. Between 1944 and 1956, the castle was used as a housing facility, resulting in damage to the castle's interior.

In December 2000, the Mir Castle was listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

Related World Heritage Sites

  • Nesvizh Castle
  • Litomysl Castle
  • References

    Mir Castle Complex Wikipedia


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