Siddhesh Joshi (Editor)

Martin Browning

Updated on
Share on FacebookTweet on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Reddit
Covid-19
Nationality  British
Institution  University of Oxford
Name  Martin Browning

Martin Browning httpsbfiuchicagoedusitesdefaultfilesstyle
Alma mater  Tilburg University, Netherlands
Books  Shocks, Stocks and Socks: Consumption Smoothing and the Replacement of Durables During an Unemployment Spell
Education  Tilburg University, London School of Economics and Political Science
People also search for  Richard Blundell, Costas Meghir, Stephen R. Jones

Martin James Browning (born 1946) is Professor of Economics at the University of Oxford, Oxford, England, a Fellow of Nuffield College, Oxford, a Fellow of the Econometric Society, and a Fellow of the European Economic Association.

Contents

Education

Browning received his undergraduate education at the London School of Economics and his doctorate from Tilburg University.

Career

He was previously the Director of the Center for Applied Microeconometrics at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Before the appointment at University of Copenhagen, he was a Professor at McMaster University, Canada.

Research

His work is in microeconomic analysis, with emphasis in the empirical assessments of theoretical propositions. He has worked in the areas of intrahousehold decision making; demand analysis; consumption and saving, and its interaction with labor supply. An important part of his work concerns the empirical assessment of rationality through the concept of revealed preference, and the modeling of individual heterogeneity in applied work.

Selected journal articles

  • Browning, Martin; Chiappori, Pierre-André (November 1998). "Efficient intra-household allocations: a general characterization and empirical tests". Econometrica. The Econometric Society via JSTOR. 66 (6): 1241–1278. doi:10.2307/2999616. 
  • Browning, Martin; Chiappori, Pierre-André (November 1998). "Efficient intra-household allocations: a general characterization and empirical Tests". Econometrica. The Econometric Society via JSTOR. 66 (6): 1241–1278. doi:10.2307/2999616. 
  • Browning, Martin; Crossley, Thomas F. (October 2000). "Luxuries are easier to postpone: a proof". Journal of Political Economy. University of Chicago Press. 108 (5): 1022–1026. doi:10.1086/317668. 
  • Browning, Martin; Lechene, Valérie (January 2003). "Children and demand: direct and non-direct effects". Review of Economics of the Household. Springer. 1 (1): 9–31. doi:10.1023/A:1021895313920. 
  • Browning, Martin; Blundell, Richard W.; Crawford, Ian A. (January 2003). "Nonparametric engel curves and revealed preference". Econometrica. The Econometric Society via JSTOR. 71 (1): 205–240. doi:10.2307/3082045. 
  • Browning, Martin; Crossley, Thomas F. (May 2009). "Are two cheap, noisy measures better than one expensive, accurate one?". American Economic Review. American Economic Review. 99 (2): 99–103. doi:10.1257/aer.99.2.99. 
  • Browning, Martin; Chiappori, Pierre-André; Lechene, Valérie (June 2010). "Distributional effects in household models: separate spheres and income pooling". The Economic Journal. Royal Economic Society. 120 (545): 786–799. doi:10.1111/j.1468-0297.2009.02311.x. 
  • Browning, Martin; Lewbel, Arthur; Chiappori, Pierre-André (2013). "Estimating consumption economies of scale, adult equivalence scales, and household bargaining power". Review of Economic Studies. Oxford University Press. 80 (4): 1267–1303. doi:10.1093/restud/rdt019. 
  • Browning, Martin; Carro, Jesus M. (February 2014). "Dynamic binary outcome models with maximal heterogeneity". Journal of Econometrics. Journal of Econometrics. 178 (2): 805–823. doi:10.1016/j.jeconom.2013.11.005. 
  • References

    Martin Browning Wikipedia


    Topics
     
    B
    i
    Link
    H2
    L