Kalpana Kalpana (Editor)

List of light sources

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This is a list of sources of light, including both natural and artificial processes that emit light. This article focuses on sources that produce wavelengths from about 390 to 700 nanometers called visible light.

Contents

Electric discharge

  • Arc lamp
  • Flashtube
  • Lightning
  • Electric spark
  • Electrodeless lamp
  • Excimer lamp
  • Fluorescent lamp
  • Compact fluorescent lamp
  • Tanning lamp
  • Black lights
  • Geissler tube
  • Moore tube (Defunct)
  • "Ruhmkorff" lamp (Defunct)
  • High-intensity discharge lamp
  • Carbon arc lamp
  • Ceramic discharge metal-halide lamp
  • Hydrargyrum medium-arc iodide lamp
  • Mercury-vapor lamp
  • Metal-halide lamp
  • Sodium-vapor lamp
  • Sulfur lamp
  • Xenon arc lamp
  • Hollow-cathode lamp
  • Induction lighting
  • Sulfur lamp
  • Neon and argon lamps
  • Dekatron (Defunct)
  • Nixie tube
  • Plasma lamp
  • Xenon flash lamp
  • Incandescence

  • Black-body radiation
  • Carbon button lamp (Defunct)
  • Earthquake light
  • Halogen lamp
  • Incandescent light bulb
  • Lava
  • Nernst lamp (Defunct)
  • Volcanic eruption
  • Lamps

  • Argand lamp (Defunct)
  • Argon flash
  • Carbide lamp (Defunct)
  • Betty lamp (Defunct)
  • Butter lamp
  • Flash-lamp (Defunct)
  • Gas lighting
  • Gas mantle
  • Kerosene lamps
  • Lanterns
  • Limelights (Defunct)
  • Oil lamps
  • Tilley lamp (Defunct)
  • Other

  • Bunsen burner
  • Candle
  • Embers
  • Explosives
  • Fire
  • Fire whirl
  • Fireworks
  • Flamethrower
  • Muzzle flash
  • Rubens' tube
  • Torch
  • Nuclear and high-energy particle

  • Annihilation
  • Bremsstrahlung
  • Čerenkov radiation
  • Cyclotron radiation
  • Fusor
  • Nuclear explosion
  • Scintillation
  • Synchrotron light source
  • Celestial and atmospheric

  • Astronomical objects
  • Sun (sunlight, solar radiation)
  • Corona
  • Photosphere
  • Stars (Starlight)
  • Nova / supernova / hypernova
  • Galaxies
  • Milky Way
  • Star clusters
  • Deep sky objects
  • Quasars
  • Accretion discs
  • Blazars
  • Magnetars
  • Pulsars
  • Atmospheric entry
  • Meteors
  • Meteor showers
  • Bolide
  • Earth-grazing fireball
  • Lightning (Plasma)
  • Sprite (lightning)
  • Ball lightning
  • Upper-atmospheric lightning
  • Dry lightning
  • Aurorae
  • Čerenkov radiation
  • Luminescence

    Luminescence is emission of light by a substance not resulting from heat.

    Chemiluminescence

    Chemiluminescence is light resulting from a chemical reaction.

    Bioluminescence

    Bioluminescence is light resulting from biochemical reaction by a living organism.

  • Aequorea victoria
  • Antarctic krill
  • Cavitation bubbles
  • Foxfire
  • Glowworm
  • Luciferase
  • Panellus stipticus
  • Parchment worm
  • Piddock
  • Electrochemiluminescence

    Electrochemiluminescence is light resulting from electrochemical reaction.

    Crystalloluminescence

    Crystalloluminescence is light produced during crystallization.

    Electroluminescence

    Electroluminescence is light resulting of an electric current passed through a substance.

  • Light-emitting diodes
  • Organic light-emitting diodes
  • Polymer light-emitting diodes
  • AMOLED
  • Light-emitting electrochemical cell
  • Electroluminescent wires
  • Field-induced polymer electroluminescent
  • Laser
  • Chemical laser
  • Dye laser
  • Free-electron laser
  • Gas dynamic laser
  • Gas laser
  • Ion laser
  • Laser diode
  • Metal-vapor laser
  • Nonlinear optics
  • Quantum well laser
  • Ruby laser
  • Solid-state laser
  • Cathodoluminescence

    Cathodoluminescence is light resulting from a luminescent material being struck by the electrons.

    Mechanoluminescence

    Mechanoluminescence is light resulting from a mechanical action on a solid.

  • Triboluminescence
  • Triboluminescence, a type of mechanoluminescence, is light generated when bonds in a material are broken when that material is scratched, crushed, or rubbed.

  • Fractoluminescence
  • Fractoluminescence, a type of mechanoluminescence, is light generated when bonds in certain crystals are broken by fractures.

  • Piezoluminescence
  • Piezoluminescence, a type of mechanoluminescence, is light produced by the action of pressure on certain solids.

  • Sonoluminescence
  • Sonoluminescence, a type of mechanoluminescence, is light resulting from imploding bubbles in a liquid when excited by sound.

    Photoluminescence

    Photoluminescence is light resulting from absorption of photons.

  • Fluorescence
  • Fluorescence, a type of photoluminescence, is the emission of light by a substance that has absorbed light or other electromagnetic radiation.

  • Phosphorescence
  • Unlike fluorescence, a phosphorescent material does not immediately re-emit the radiation it absorbs.

    Radioluminescence

    Radioluminescence is light resulting from bombardment by ionizing radiation.

    Thermoluminescence

    Thermoluminescence is light from the re-emission of absorbed energy when a substance is heated.

    Cryoluminescence

    Cryoluminescence is the emission of light when an object is cooled.

    References

    List of light sources Wikipedia


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