Tripti Joshi

Lady Eve Balfour

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Name  Lady Balfour

Education  University of Reading
Lady Eve Balfour wwwladyevebalfourorgImagesevebulljpg
Died  January 14, 1990, Dunbar, United Kingdom
Books  The Living Soil, The Living Soil and The Haughley Experiment
Organizations founded  Soil Association, International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements

2007 lady eve balfour memorial lecture richard heinberg


Lady Evelyn Barbara "Eve" Balfour, (16 July 1898 – 16 January 1990) was a British farmer, educator, organic farming pioneer, and a founding figure in the organic movement. She was one of the first women to study agriculture at an English university, graduating from the institution now known as the University of Reading.

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Lady Eve Balfour Eve Balfour The Founder of the Soil Association and the Voice of

Balfour, one of the six children of Gerald, 2nd Earl of Balfour, and the niece of former prime minister Arthur J. Balfour, had decided she wanted to be a farmer by the age of 12. At age 17, she enrolled, as one of the first women students to do so, at Reading University College for the Diploma of Agriculture. After obtaining her Diploma in 1917, she completed a year's practical farming, living in 'digs' at 102 Basingstoke Road, Reading. During this time she worked as a ploughman at Manor Farm. She was subsequently appointed Bailiff to a farm near Newport, Wales under the direction of various war committees, notably the Monmouthshire Women's War Agricultural Committee whose Chairwoman was Lady Mather Jackson of Llantilio Court, Abergavenny.

Lady Eve Balfour Eve Balfour by Angus basil brown c1916 enwikipediaorgw Flickr

In 1919, at the age of 21 she and her sister Mary bought, using inheritance monies put into a trust by their father, New Bells Farm in Haughley Green, Suffolk. In 1939, she launched the Haughley Experiment, the first long-term, side-by-side scientific comparison of organic and chemical-based farming.

Lady Eve Balfour Explore Your Archive People Stories Eve Balfour Our Country

In 1943, leading London publishing house Faber & Faber published Balfour's book, The Living Soil. Reprinted numerous times, it became a founding text of the emerging organic food and farming movement. The book synthesised existing arguments in favour of organics with a description of her plans for the Haughley Experiment.

In 1946, Balfour co-founded and became the first president of the Soil Association, an international organisation which promotes sustainable agriculture (and the main organic farming association in the UK today). She continued to farm, write and lecture for the rest of her life. She is attributed with stating that, "Health can be as infectious as disease, growing and spreading under the right conditions". In 1958, she embarked on a year-long tour of Australia and New Zealand, during which she met Australian organic farming pioneers, including Henry Shoobridge, president of the Living Soil Association of Tasmania, the first organisation to affiliate with the Soil Association. In South Africa, experiments were undertaken by the Valley Trust [1] using Balfour's methods in 1961 and 1962. These subsequently demonstrated that the organic approach was all that was necessary, indeed, that "the people did not need chemicals, which were worse than useless on the dry soil."

She was appointed OBE in the 1990 New Year Honours.

Soil Association

In 1946, Balfour co-founded and became the first president of the Soil Association, an international organisation which promotes sustainable agriculture (and the main organic farming association in the UK today).

Through the introduction of the Agricultural Act of 1947, Britain established its commitment towards a highly mechanised, intensive farming system, which disappointed Balfour, as it refused to offer support or funding towards organic production methods. By 1952, the Soil Association saw its membership increase to 3000, largely owing to the dedication of a small committee, including Balfour and the publication of their journal 'Mother Earth' (renamed 'Living Earth').

She continued to farm, write and lecture for the rest of her life. In 1958, she embarked on a year-long lecture tour of Australia and New Zealand, during which she met Australian organic farming pioneers, including Henry Shoobridge, president of the Living Soil Association of Tasmania, the first organisation to affiliate with the Soil Association.

She moved towards the Suffolk coast in 1963 but made continual visits back to the farm at Haughley. The farm was sold in 1970, owing to mounting debts incurred by the centre. In 1984, she retired from the Soil Association aged 85 yrs but continued in the cultivation of her large garden. In 1989 she suffered a stroke from which she died, in Scotland, aged 90 yrs old, shortly after being appointed OBE in the 1990 New Year Honours list, on 14 January 1990. In the immediate day following her death, a grant was offered to encourage British farmers to change over towards organic methods, by the Conservative Government (under Margaret Thatcher).

Publications

  • The Living Soil (1943)
  • Common Sense Compost Making (1973) a revision by Eve Balfour of Maye E Bruce's work
  • The Living Soil and the Haughley Experiment (1975)
  • Towards a Sustainable Agriculture the Living Soil (1982)
  • She wrote, with Beryl Hearnden, several detective novels under the pseudonym Hearnden Balfour:

  • A Gentleman from Texas (1927)
  • The Paper Chase (1928)
  • The Enterprising Burglar(1928)
  • Anything Might Happen (1931)
  • References

    Lady Eve Balfour Wikipedia


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