Kalpana Kalpana (Editor)

Höfðaletur

Updated on
Share on FacebookTweet on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Reddit
Covid-19

Höfðaletur (head letters) is an unusual Icelandic font used in carving that has recently been adapted for use in printing. The letters do not have a fixed form.

Contents

History

The oldest known examples of Höfðaletur are thought to be 16th century, and the font is considered to have been modeled on Gothic textura.

The letters do not have a fixed form, but the verticals all have a "head" that is decorated with carving, usually simple and sloping but sometimes double. There are many conjectures about the derivation of the name höfðaletur, but no definite evidence exists.

Older examples of Höfðaletur are carved on wood and are always deeply incised so that the letters are in relief. Modern examples may also be found on metal objects, such as wedding rings. According to Brynjúlfur Jónsson, Höfðaletur replaced the quite different Spónletur ("spoon-letters") on spoons and other silver objects in the late nineteenth century

Modern uses

Some Icelandic font developers have experimented with Höfðaletur, including Gunnlaug Briem, Hörður Lárusson. Sigurður Orri Þórhannesson and Sól Hrafnsdóttir.

References

Höfðaletur Wikipedia


Similar Topics
Kevin Smith: Burn in Hell
Miracles Still Happen
Puan Chan Cheong
Topics
 
B
i
Link
H2
L