Neha Patil (Editor)

Gandantegchinlen Monastery

Updated on
Share on FacebookTweet on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Reddit
Covid-19
Location  Ulaanbaatar
Founded  1727
Sect  Gelug
Founder  Yongzheng Emperor
Founded by  Yongzheng Emperor
Type  Tibetan Buddhist
Phone  +976 11 36 0354
Gandantegchinlen Monastery
Date renovated  State protection in 1994
Address  Ulaanbaatar 16040, Mongolia
Similar  Zaisan Memorial, Choijin Lama Temple, Winter Palace of the Bogd, Gorkhi‑Terelj National Park, Erdene Zuu Monastery
Profiles
Facebook

The gandantegchinlen monastery ulaanbaatar mongolia holy temple


The Gandantegchinlen Monastery (Mongolian: Гандантэгчинлэн хийд, Gandantegchinlen khiid, Chinese:甘丹寺, short name: Gandan Mongolian: Гандан) is a Chinese-style Tibetan Buddhist monastery in the Mongolian capital of Ulaanbaatar that has been restored and revitalized since 1990. The Tibetan name translates to the "Great Place of Complete Joy". It currently has over 150 monks in residence. It features a 26.5-meter-high statue of Avalokiteśvara. It came under state protection in 1994.

Contents

Pm modi visits the gandan monastery in mongolia


History

The monastery was constructed by order of the 5th Jebtsundamba Khutuktu in 1809. The first temple was the Gungaachoilin Datsan. Only one wooden pillar remains from this temple. In 1838, the Gandantegchenlin Temple was built along with the private residence of the Jebtsundamba Khutuktu. The 13th Dalai Lama stayed in the residence in 1904. In 1840, the Vajradhara Temple was built. In 1869, the Zuu Temple was built. In 1913, the tall Avalokiteśvara temple was built. In 1925, the temple for keeping the remains of the 8th Jebtsundamba Khutuktu was built. It is now the monastery library.

In the 1930s, the Communist government of Mongolia, under the leadership of Khorloogiin Choibalsan and under the influence of Joseph Stalin, destroyed all but a few monasteries and killed more than 15,000 lamas.

Gandantegchinlen Khiid monastery, having escaped this mass destruction, was closed in 1938, but then reopened in 1944 and was allowed to continue as the only functioning Buddhist monastery, under a skeleton staff, as a token homage to traditional Mongolian culture and religion. With the end of Marxism in Mongolia in 1990, restrictions on worship were lifted.

Statue

The original statue, made of copper, was built after appeals to the Mongolian public; its intent was to restore the sight of the 8th Jebtsundamba, also known as Bogd Khan), who had claimed the title of Emperor of Mongolia. The statue was built by Bogd Javzandamba's principal minister, Chin Wan Khanddorj. Russian troops dismantled the original statue in 1938. After the end of the Soviet era, the statue of Avalokiteśvara was rebuilt in 1996, funded by donations by the Mongolian people. It features 2,286 precious stones and is gilded with gold leaf.

Since 1992, the Supreme Leader of the Centre of All Mongolian Buddhists and Abbot of Gandantegchinlen Monastery has been Lama Gabju Choijamts Demberel.

The monastery is surrounded by the Gandan ger suburb.

References

Gandantegchinlen Monastery Wikipedia


Similar Topics
Choijin Lama Temple
Erdene Zuu Monastery
Zaisan Memorial
Topics
 
B
i
Link
H2
L