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Ctenophorus fionni

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Kingdom  Animalia
Subphylum  Vertebrata
Order  Squamata
Rank  Species
Phylum  Chordata
Class  Reptilia
Suborder  Iguania
Ctenophorus fionni httpsuploadwikimediaorgwikipediacommonsthu
Similar  Ctenophorus, Yinnietharra rock dragon, Ctenophorus decresii, Ctenophorus reticulatus, Ctenophorus pictus

Ctenophorus fionni, commonly known as the Arcoona rock dragon, peninsula dragon, or peninsula crevice-dragon, is a species of agamid lizard occurring only in South Australia.

Contents

Etymology

The specific name, fionni, is in honor of someone called "Fionn", the identity of whom Procter never revealed.

Description

Adults of this species have a total length (including tail) of 10 to 12 cm (3.9 to 4.7 in). Males can be distinguished from females by their more distinct stripes, often bright red or orange, while a female’s coloring is more blended and not as sharp. These dragons have strong hind legs, and they are capable of jumping surprising heights.

Ecology and behaviour

The peninsula dragon is native to the rocky areas of Arcoona. They spend their time basking on rocks, and retreat to rock crevices for shelter. They are fast and agile, and will immediately dash to safety in between rocks when threatened. Peninsula dragons communicate through body posture, body movement, and color display, and these communications are most likely to be displayed during breeding seasons.

Reproduction

Breeding season starts at around spring, when the weather is beginning to warm up. Males in this time of year become very active, showing dominance and fighting for females. Females are known to lay up to 6 eggs, typically during spring and summer depending on the location and conditions.

Diet

Peninsula dragons are omnivores, meaning that they feed on a diet of both meat, in this case insects, and vegetation. The dragon’s diet comprises approximately 70% insects and 30% vegetation.

Threats

  • Habitat loss
  • Car roads
  • Introduced species
  • References

    Ctenophorus fionni Wikipedia


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