Kalpana Kalpana (Editor)

Bowe v R

Updated on
Share on FacebookTweet on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Reddit
Covid-19
Decided  8 March 2006
End date  March 8, 2006
Bowe v R
Full case name  Forrester Bowe (Junior) and Trono Davis, Appellants v The Queen, Respondent
Citation(s)  [2006] UKPC 10, [2002] 2 AC 235, [2006] 1 WLR 1623
Prior action(s)  Court of Appeal of the Bahamas
Ruling court  Judicial Committee of the Privy Council

Bowe v R is a 2006 Judicial Committee of the Privy Council (JCPC) case in which it was held that it was unconstitutional in the Bahamas for capital punishment to be the mandatory sentence for murder. The JCPC held that because the Constitution of the Bahamas contains a qualified right to life and prohibits "inhuman or degrading punishment", following a murder conviction, a trial judge must have discretion to impose a lesser penalty than death by hanging; capital punishment may be applied only in those cases that contain aggravating factors as compared to other murder cases.

The result in the case reflected the findings R v Hughes, Fox v R, and Reyes v R, 2002 JCPC rulings from other Caribbean jurisdictions.

References

Bowe v R Wikipedia


Similar Topics
Cowboy Serenade
Robert Guba Aisi
Katja Schumacher
Topics
 
B
i
Link
H2
L