Tripti Joshi

Alejandro Carrion

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Occupation  Writer
Role  Poet
Name  Alejandro Carrion

Nationality  Ecuadorian
Language  Spanish
Books  Luz del nuevo paisaje
Alejandro Carrion wwwoocitiesorgeduardonetilustresImage1gif
Born  Alejandro Carrion Aguirre March 11, 1915 Loja, Ecuador (1915-03-11)
Notable awards  Maria Moors Cabot prize (New York, 1961), Premio Eugenio Espejo (Ecuador, 1981), XIV Premio Leopoldo Alas 'Clarin' (Barcelona, 1969)
Relatives  Benjamin Carrion (1897–1979), uncle
Died  January 4, 1992, Quito, Ecuador

Alejandro Carrión Aguirre (11 March 1915 – 4 January 1992) was a poet, novelist and journalist. He wrote the novel La espina (1959), the short story book La manzana dañada (1983), and numerous poetry books. As a journalist he published many of his articles under the pseudonym "Juan Sin Cielo." In 1956 he founded, along with Pedro Jorge Vera, the political magazine La Calle. He directed the literary magazine Letras del Ecuador. He received the Maria Moors Cabot prize (1961) from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism as well as the Ecuadorian National Prize Premio Eugenio Espejo (1981) for his body of work. He was the nephew of Benjamín Carrión and Clodoveo Carrión.

Contents

The journalist

Alejandro Carrión wrote articles and political commentary in the following periodicals and newspapers:

Newspapers

  • El Tiempo, Bogotá, 1947
  • La Tierra, Quito 1942–1948
  • El Sol, Quito, 1950;
  • La Razón, Guayaquil, 1968–1969
  • El Universo, Guayaquil, 1948–1968
  • Diario Las Américas, Miami, 1970–1979
  • Diario El Comercio, Quito 1980–1992
  • Magazines

  • Revista de la Casa de la Cultura Ecuatoriana, 1945–1950
  • Letras del Ecuador, 1945–1950
  • Sábado, Bogotá, 1947
  • La Calle, Quito 1959–1969
  • Vistazo, Guayaquil 1969–1992;
  • Américas, Washington, D.C., 1977–1979
  • Revista de la Sociedad Jurídico-Literaria, 1981–1982
  • References

    Alejandro Carrión Wikipedia


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