Puneet Varma

81st United States Congress

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Senate Pres. pro tem:  Kenneth McKellar (D)
Senate Majority:  Democratic
House Speaker:  Sam Rayburn (D)
House Majority:  Democratic
81st United States Congress
Senate President  Vacant until January 20, 1949 Alben W. Barkley (D) from January 20, 1949
Members:  96 Senators 435 Representatives 4 Non-voting members

The Eighty-first United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from January 3, 1949 to January 3, 1951, during the fifth and sixth years of Harry S. Truman's presidency.

Contents

The apportionment of seats in this House of Representatives was based on the Sixteenth Census of the United States in 1940. Both chambers had a Democratic majority.

Major events

  • January 20, 1949: Inauguration of President Truman and Vice President Barkley
  • August 16, 1949: Office of Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff created
  • January 21, 1950: Accused communist spy Alger Hiss was convicted of perjury
  • January 31, 1950: President Truman ordered the development of the hydrogen bomb, in response to the detonation of the Soviet Union's first atomic bomb in 1949
  • June 27, 1950: Korean War: President Truman ordered American military forces to aid in the defense of South Korea
  • Major legislation

  • June 20, 1949: Central Intelligence Agency Act, ch. 227, 63 Stat. 208, 50 U.S.C. § 403a
  • May 5, 1950: Uniform Code of Military Justice, ch. 169, 64 Stat. 109
  • October 25, 1949: Hospital Survey and Construction Amendments of 1949, ch. 722, Pub.L. 81–380, 63 Stat. 898
  • October 26, 1949: Fair Labor Standards Amendment, ch. 736, Pub.L. 81–393, 63 Stat. 910, 29 U.S.C. ch. 8
  • October 31, 1949: Agricultural Act of 1949, ch. 792, 63 Stat. 1051
  • May 10, 1950: National Science Foundation Act, ch. 171, Pub.L. 81–507, 64 Stat. 149, 42 U.S.C. ch. 16
  • September 8, 1950: Defense Production Act of 1950, Pub.L. 81–774, 64 Stat. 798
  • September 12, 1950: Budget and Accounting Procedures Act of 1950, ch. 946, 64 Stat. 832
  • September 23, 1950: McCarran Internal Security Act (including Subversive Activities Control Act of 1950), ch. 1024, 64 Stat. 987, 50 U.S.C. § 781
  • September 30, 1950: Performance Rating Act, ch. 1123, 64 Stat. 1098
  • August 15, 1950: Omnibus Medical Research Act, Pub.L. 81–692, 64 Stat. 443 (including Public Health Services Act Amendments, which established the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness)
  • December 29, 1950: Celler–Kefauver Act (Anti-Merger Act), ch. 1184, 64 Stat. 1125
  • January 12, 1951: Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950, ch. 1228, 64 Stat. 1245 (codified in 50 U.S.C. App., here [1])
  • Treaties

  • July 21, 1949: North Atlantic Treaty ratified, establishing the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)
  • Hearings

  • May 11, 1950: Kefauver Committee hearings into U.S. organized crime began
  • Senate

  • President: Vacant until January 20, 1949
  • Alben W. Barkley (D), from January 20, 1949
  • Majority (Democratic) leadership

  • Majority Leader: Scott W. Lucas
  • Majority Whip: Francis J. Myers
  • Caucus Secretary: Brien McMahon
  • Minority (Republican) leadership

  • Minority Leader: Kenneth S. Wherry
  • Minority Whip: Leverett Saltonstall
  • Conference Chairman: Eugene Millikin
  • Republican Conference Secretary: Milton Young
  • National Senatorial Committee Chair: Styles Bridges
  • Policy Committee Chairman: Robert A. Taft
  • House of Representatives

  • Speaker: Sam Rayburn (D)
  • Majority (Democratic) leadership

  • Majority Leader: John W. McCormack
  • Majority Whip: J. Percy Priest
  • Caucus Chairman: Francis E. Walter
  • Caucus Secretary: Chase G. Woodhouse
  • Democratic Campaign Committee Chairman: Michael J. Kirwan
  • Minority (Republican) leadership

  • Minority Leader: Joseph W. Martin, Jr.
  • Minority Whip: Leslie C. Arends
  • Conference Chair: Roy O. Woodruff
  • Caucuses

  • House Democratic Caucus
  • Senate

    Senators are popularly elected statewide every two years, with one-third beginning new six-year terms with each Congress. Senators are ordered first by state, and then by seniority. Preceding the names in the list below are Senate class numbers, which indicate the cycle of their election.

    Changes in membership

    The count below reflects changes from the beginning of this Congress.

    Committees

    Lists of committees and their party leaders.

    Senate

  • Agriculture and Forestry
  • Appropriations
  • Banking and Currency
  • District of Columbia
  • Expenditures in Executive Departments
  • Finance
  • Foreign Relations
  • Interior and Insular Affairs
  • Subcommittee on Internal Security
  • Interstate and Foreign Commerce
  • Judiciary
  • Labor and Public Welfare
  • Organized Crime in Interstate Commerce (Select)
  • Post Office and Civil Service
  • Public Works
  • Remodeling the Senate Chamber (Special)
  • Small Business (Select)
  • Small Business Enterprises (Special)
  • Whole
  • House of Representatives

  • Agriculture
  • Appropriations
  • Banking and Currency
  • District of Columbia
  • Education and Labor
  • Expenditures in the Executive Departments
  • Foreign Affairs
  • House Administration
  • Merchant Marine and Fisheries
  • Post Office and Civil Service
  • Public Lands
  • Public Works
  • Rules
  • Small Business (Select)
  • Standards of Official Conduct
  • Un-American Activities
  • Veterans' Affairs
  • Ways and Means
  • Whole
  • Joint committees

  • Atomic Energy
  • Conditions of Indian Tribes (Special)
  • Defense Production
  • Disposition of Executive Papers
  • Foreign Economic Cooperation
  • Economic
  • Labor Management Relations
  • Legislative Budget
  • The Library
  • Navajo-Hopi Indian Administration
  • Printing
  • Reduction of Nonessential Federal Expenditures
  • Taxation
  • Legislative branch agency directors

  • Architect of the Capitol: David Lynn
  • Attending Physician of the United States Congress: George Calver
  • Comptroller General of the United States: Lindsay C. Warren
  • Librarian of Congress: Luther H. Evans
  • Public Printer of the United States: John J. Deviny
  • Senate

  • Chaplain: Peter Marshall (Presbyterianism) (until February 3, 1949), Frederick Brown Harris (Methodist) (starting February 3, 1949)
  • Parliamentarian: Charles Watkins
  • Secretary: Leslie Biffle
  • Sergeant at Arms: Joseph C. Duke
  • House of Representatives

  • Chaplain:
  • James Shera Montgomery (Methodist)
  • Bernard Braskamp (Presbyterian)
  • Clerk: Ralph R. Roberts
  • Doorkeeper: William Mosley Miller
  • Parliamentarian: Lewis Deschler
  • Postmaster: Finis E. Scott
  • Sergeant at Arms: Joseph H. Callahan
  • References

    81st United States Congress Wikipedia


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