Puneet Varma

2015 in the United Kingdom

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2015 in the United Kingdom

Events from the year 2015 in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

Contents

Incumbents

  • Monarch – Elizabeth II
  • Prime Minister – David Cameron (Coalition until 8 May, Conservative starting 8 May)
  • January

  • 2 January – Buckingham Palace denies "any suggestion of impropriety with underage minors" by Prince Andrew, Duke of York, after he was named in U.S. court documents related to a lawsuit against convicted sex offender, American financier Jeffrey Epstein.
  • 3 January – Eight people are reported missing after a cargo vessel, the Cemfjord, capsizes in the Pentland Firth, Scotland.
  • 4 January – The Höegh Osaka, a Singaporean cargo ship transporting luxury cars, runs aground near the Isle of Wight after it started listing shortly after leaving the Port of Southampton. An investigation is launched.
  • 5 January – The Met Office reports that 2014 was the hottest year on record for the UK.
  • 6 January
  • Figures from the last three months show that England's A&E waiting time performance has dropped to its worst levels for a decade.
  • Comedian and actor Stephen Fry confirms he is to marry his partner, Elliott Spencer. The couple are married two weeks later at a registry office in Norfolk.
  • 7 January – The SMMT announce that car sales surged in 2014 with 2.47 million new cars registered; a 9% increase from 2013 and the best annual performance since 2004.
  • 9 January
  • Hurricane-force winds cause travel disruption and leave tens of thousands of homes without power across Scotland.
  • Circle Holdings, the first private company to operate an NHS hospital, announces plans to withdraw from its contract to run Hinchingbrooke Hospital because it believes the franchise is "no longer viable under current terms".
  • Chancellor George Osborne says that tackling terrorism is a "national priority" and security services will get all of the resources they need in light of the recent Charlie Hebdo attacks in Paris, and the MI5 confirming that three UK plots had been recently stopped.
  • Abu Hamza, the former head of London's Finsbury Park mosque who preached Islamic terrorism, is sentenced to life in prison by a US court.
  • 11 January – Major London landmarks, including Trafalgar Square and Tower Bridge, are lit in the colours of the French national flag in tribute to the victims of the recent terrorist attacks in Paris.
  • 12 January
  • 19-year-old Lewis Daynes who murdered 14-year-old Breck Bednar after meeting him online in February 2014, is sentenced to life in prison.
  • Security chiefs meet with David Cameron to review the risk of a terrorist attack, similar to the recent attacks in Paris, as the likelihood of such an event becomes greater.
  • David Cameron brands Fox News' terror expert a "complete idiot" after he claims that Birmingham is "totally Muslim" and "non-Muslims just simply don't go in".
  • 13 January – Figures show that inflation rates fell to 0.5% in December, the joint lowest on record, mainly due to the drop in fuel prices.
  • 14 January –
  • The Met Office warns that a storm, dubbed "Storm Rachel", will bring snow, ice, rain, floods and gale-force winds to the UK. It's after severe heavy snow and gales hit Scotland, and a tornado struck homes in Wales the previous night.
  • Ed Miliband, Nick Clegg and Nigel Farage, the three respective leaders of Labour, the Liberal Democrats and the UK Independence Party, have written to Prime Minister and Conservative Party leader David Cameron to say that they will still take part in the planned pre-election televised debates even if he is not present. Cameron had said he would not take part unless the Green Party was included, but the other leaders will call for the various broadcasters holding the debates to include an empty podium, enabling Cameron to be included if he changes his mind.
  • 15 January
  • A set of council offices, a funeral parlour, and a thatched cottage are extensively damaged after they are set ablaze due to a spate of arson attacks in South Oxfordshire. A suspect is arrested.
  • Ethel Lang, the last person living in the UK who was born in the reign of Queen Victoria, dies at the age of 114.
  • 16 January – UK counter-terrorism police warn that members of the Jewish community could be at risk following the recent terror incidents in Paris.
  • 21 January –
  • Sir John Chilcot says that his report into the Iraq war will be published after the general election. A draft version has been completed, but time is needed for those criticised by the findings of the inquiry to respond.
  • The Sun defiantly denies that it is to cease publishing topless women on Page 3 after posting a preview of its next publication featuring topless model Nicole Neal, calling the recent absence of the feature a "mammary lapse".
  • 23 January – New proposals are published by the UK's major broadcasters to include the leaders of more political parties in the forthcoming televised debates. The BBC and ITV will now host seven-way debates between the leaders of the Conservatives, Labour, the Liberal Democrats, UK Independence Party, the Green Party, the Scottish National Party and Plaid Cymru. Meanwhile, Channel 4 and Sky will host head-to-head debates between David Cameron and Ed Miliband.
  • 24 January –
  • David Cameron and HRH Prince Charles fly to Saudi Arabia to pay respects to the late King Abdullah who died the previous day.
  • UK Independence Party MEP Amjad Bashir defects to the Conservative Party, describing his former party as one of "ruthless self-interest". In response UKIP claims Bashir was suspended from the party over "extremely serious" financial issues, something the MEP dismisses as "absurd and made-up allegations".
  • 26 January – Libby Lane becomes the first woman ordained as a bishop in the Church of England, at York Minster.
  • 27 January – Helen Macdonald wins the 2014 Costa Book Awards with her autobiography H is for Hawk.
  • 28 January – An earthquake of magnitude 3.8 is felt across the East Midlands.
  • 30 January – Commemorations are made for the 50th anniversary of Sir Winston Churchill's funeral, including a service at Westminster Abbey, and the retracing of the same boat journey that carried Churchill's coffin along the River Thames in 1965.
  • 31 January – The head of the Police Federation of England and Wales expresses his controversial support for all front-line police officers in England and Wales to be offered Tasers in light of the increased terrorism threat to the UK.
  • February

  • 2 February – London's population hits a record high of 8.6m and is forecast to reach 11m by 2050.
  • 3 February – MPs approve a controversial new technique to allow babies created from three people. If passed by the House of Lords, the UK will become the first country in the world to offer this medical procedure.
  • 4 February –
  • The entire cabinet of Rotherham Borough Council announces its intention to resign from office after a report into the Rotherham child sexual exploitation scandal concludes the council's handling of the scandal was "not fit for purpose".
  • Home Secretary Theresa May appoints New Zealand judge Lowell Goddard to lead a new statutory inquiry into historical child sexual abuse.
  • 5 February – Former pop star Gary Glitter is found guilty of sexually abusing three young girls between 1975 and 1980.
  • 6 February –
  • Huge changes to England's NHS in recent years have been "disastrous" and distracted from patient care, a report by the King's Fund says.
  • The Investigatory Powers Tribunal rules that GCHQ breached human rights laws by failing to disclose shared full details of information it shared with the United States that was garnered from data from mass internet surveillance.
  • 9 February – A child and three adults are killed whilst four others are left seriously injured after a tipper truck crashes down a hill in Bath. An investigation is launched.
  • 11 February – The government announces a review into road regulations and maintenance checks in preparation for driverless car technology.
  • 13 February
  • Former TV weatherman Fred Talbot is convicted of indecently assaulting two boys while he worked at a school in Greater Manchester, and remanded in custody to await sentence. He is cleared of a further eight charges.
  • The Prime Minister, Deputy Prime Minister and Leader of the Opposition sign a cross-party, non-partisan agreement to tackle climate change, seek a strong global climate deal, and to end the use of coal for power generation in the UK.
  • 14 February – Four people are killed following two separate accidents on major motorways; three die after a coach collides with a stationary car on the M1 and one person dies in a forty vehicle pileup on the M40.
  • 16 February – A study by King's College London indicates an increased risk of psychosis among those who smoke potent cannabis.
  • 17 February –
  • Consumer price inflation fell to 0.3% in January, according to latest official figures, its lowest level since records began.
  • Abid Naseer, a man who plotted a terrorist attack on a shopping centre in Manchester in 2009, which would have reportedly only come second to the September 11 attacks in its impact, stands on trial in the U.S.
  • Five Britons are amongst the 100 Mars One applicants shortlisted for a one-way trip to Mars to become the first humans to set foot on the planet.
  • 18 February – The Metropolitan Police says it will examine video footage appearing to show fans of Chelsea football club preventing a black man from boarding a train on the Paris Metro.
  • 20 February – Police appeal for help after it is feared that three London schoolgirls who have gone missing, are heading to Turkey with the intention of crossing the border into Syria and join terror group ISIL.
  • 21 February – The government pledges £300m for tackling dementia, aiming to become a "world leader" in research with a global fund to produce new treatments by 2025.
  • 24 February – Conservative MP Sir Malcolm Rifkind resigns as chair of the Parliamentary Intelligence and Security Committee, and announces he will vacate his seat at the general election following a cash for access scandal.
  • 26 February –
  • An independent report finds that Jimmy Savile sexually abused 63 people connected to Stoke Mandeville Hospital between 1968 and 1992, but the one formal complaint made was ignored.
  • The masked Islamic State militant known as "Jihadi John", responsible for the beheadings of numerous Western hostages, is named as Mohammed Emwazi from West London.
  • 27 February – Following his guilty verdict on 5 February, former pop star Gary Glitter is sentenced to 16 years' imprisonment.
  • March

  • 4 March – The stepbrother of 16-year-old Becky Watts, a schoolgirl who was reported missing two weeks previously, is charged with her murder after body parts are found at a house in Barton Hill, Bristol.
  • 5 March – David Cameron is accused of "cowering" from the public as he confirms that he will only take part in one televised debate ahead of the general election, rejecting proposals for a head-to-head with Labour leader Ed Miliband.
  • 6 March –
  • A 13-year-old boy pleads guilty to the murder of 53-year-old Christopher Barry who was fatally stabbed in Edmonton in December.
  • The UK's major broadcasters confirm they will press ahead with plans for three television debates, even though David Cameron said he would participate in only one of them.
  • 7 March –
  • Deputy Prime Minister and Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg says he will take David Cameron's place in the forthcoming television debates if Cameron is unwilling to participate.
  • A pitch invasion by Aston Villa fans temporarily halts the club's FA Cup quarterfinal match against West Bromwich Albion. Several fans run onto the pitch during stoppage time to prematurely celebrate Villa's 2–0 victory over West Bromwich, forcing referee Anthony Taylor to stop the game while order is restored, before hundreds of fans then invade the field on the final whistle. The incident will be investigated by the Football Association.
  • 8 March – Ed Miliband says that a future Labour government would introduce legislation to make televised debates a permanent feature of future general election campaigns, meaning politicians could not attempt to prevent them from taking place through self-interest.
  • 9 March – Thendara Satisfaction, an Irish setter who competed at this year's Crufts, dies after being supposedly poisoned at the Birmingham show. Organisers of the event say sabotage will not be tolerated after rumours that various other dogs were also poisoned this year.
  • 10 March –
  • Queen Elizabeth II names the new luxury cruise ship Britannia, the largest ever cruise ship designed for the British holiday market.
  • TV presenter Jeremy Clarkson is suspended from Top Gear, one of the BBC's most popular and profitable shows, after a "fracas" with a producer. The remainder of the series will be scrapped, the BBC says.
  • 11 March – The government announces the first NHS patients to be diagnosed through genome sequencing.
  • 13 March – Following his guilty verdict on 13 February, former TV weatherman Fred Talbot is sentenced to five years in prison.
  • 17 March –
  • Chief Superintendent David Duckenfield admits that his failure to shut a tunnel to football terraces was the direct cause of 96 deaths at the Hillsborough disaster in 1989.
  • David Cameron confirms he has accepted an offer from the major broadcasters to participate in a seven-way televised debate at the beginning of April. However, the full details of this are yet to be confirmed.
  • 19 March – One Briton is confirmed to be amongst the 21 victims killed in the ISIL backed Bardo National Museum shootings in the Tunisian capital, Tunis.
  • 20 March –
  • A partial solar eclipse occurs, ranging from 85% totality in London and southern England to 98% totality in northern Scotland.
  • UKIP MEP and general election candidate Janice Atkinson is suspended from the party after a member of her staff tried to overcharge EU expenses for a restaurant bill. The incident emerges as another UKIP election candidate, Stephen Howe, is suspended amid harassment allegations, and a third, Jonathan Stanley, resigns from the party because of what he alleges to be its "open racism and sanctimonious bullying."
  • 21 March – The UK's major broadcasters say they have agreed to hold a seven-party televised leaders debate on 2 April, which will be staged by ITV and chaired by Julie Etchingham. However, there will be no head-to-head between David Cameron and Ed Miliband, with them instead taking part in separate question and answer sessions aired jointly by Sky News and Channel 4 on 26 March. A debate featuring five opposition leaders will air on BBC One on 16 April.
  • 22 March – Membership of the Scottish National Party officially crosses the 100,000 mark, meaning that 1 in every 50 of the population of Scotland is now a member.
  • 23 March –
  • Afzal Amin, the Conservative candidate for Dudley North, resigns from the party after being accused of allegedly conspiring with the English Defence League to win votes.
  • David Cameron tells BBC News he will not serve a third term as Prime Minister if the Conservatives are elected to government again.
  • Janice Atkinson is expelled from UKIP for "bringing the party into disrepute".
  • 24 March – UK inflation fell to zero percent in February, the lowest level since records began, according to official figures.
  • 25 March –
  • It is confirmed that three Britons were among those killed when an Airbus A320 crashed in the French Alps the previous day, with no survivors.
  • Following a two-week investigation into a verbal and physical attack on producer Oisin Tymon, the BBC confirms that Top Gear presenter Jeremy Clarkson has been sacked from the programme.
  • 29 March – Police are investigating alleged death threats against BBC Director-General Tony Hall over the decision to sack Jeremy Clarkson from his Top Gear presenting role.
  • April

  • 2 April – The only televised leaders debate to include Prime Minister David Cameron is aired by ITV. The debate features the leaders of the Conservatives, Labour, the Liberal Democrats, UKIP, the Greens, the Scottish National Party and Plaid Cymru.
  • 2–7 April – An estimated £200 million-worth of jewels are stolen from Hatton Garden Safe Deposit Ltd, Hatton Garden central London, in a meticulously-planned heist that takes place over the Easter weekend. CCTV footage later emerges, at the website of UK newspaper the Daily Mirror, showing the thieves dressed as building workers and using wheelie bins.
  • 10 April – Police are investigating after it emerged that they received an emergency call from the scene of the Hatton Garden safety deposit raid, but decided not to respond.
  • 11 April –
  • Many Clouds, ridden by Leighton Aspell, wins the 2015 Grand National.
  • Oxford beat Cambridge in the first Women's Boat Race to be staged alongside the Men's race. Oxford also win the Men's race.
  • Tennis player Andy Murray marries his partner Kim Sears at a ceremony in his home town of Dunblane.
  • 16 April – The Crown Prosecution Service issues a statement indicating that Labour peer Greville Janner will not face prosecution over allegations of child sexual abuse owing to his poor health.
  • 21 April – Following a six-week trial, Justin Robertson is jailed for life with a minimum tariff of 32 years for the September 2014 contract killing of Pennie Davis at the behest of her stepson. Benjamin Carr, who paid Robertson £1,500 to carry out the killing, is convicted of conspiracy to murder and will serve at least 30 years.
  • 22 April – Supermarket retailer Tesco posts a record £6.4bn annual loss for the year ending in February 2015.
  • 26 April –
  • More than 38,000 people take part in this year's London Marathon, making it the biggest in the event's 35-year history.
  • The government donates £5 million and humanitarian aid to help people affected by the recent earthquake in Nepal, which kills over 6,000 people.
  • 27 April –
  • The British Red Cross confirms that there are still dozens of Britons who have still not been traced following the earthquake in Nepal two days ago.
  • Former Oxfordshire nurse Andrew Hutchinson is jailed for 18 years for a rape, sexual assault and voyeurism case involving unconscious women between 2011 and 2013; two of which that took place at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford.
  • 28 April – Figures show that the rate of economic growth halved to 0.3% in the first quarter, marking the slowest quarterly growth in two years.
  • 29 April –
  • The UK Supreme Court rules that the government must take immediate action to cut air pollution, following a case brought by lawyers at ClientEarth.
  • 18-year-old Kazi Islam, who was inspired by the murder of Lee Rigby, is convicted by a jury at the Old Bailey of grooming a vulnerable friend to kill two soldiers, and buying ingredients for a pipe bomb.
  • The Foreign Office confirms that a Briton living overseas was among the 6,000 killed in the Nepal earthquake, and it's feared that a further British national has been killed at the Everest Base Camp.
  • A blaze causes extensive damage at Clandon Park, a stately home in Surrey.
  • 30 April – The three main party leaders, David Cameron, Ed Milliband and Nick Clegg, take part in the final televised debate before the general election on a special edition of Question Time.
  • May

  • 2 May – Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge gives birth to a daughter at St Mary's Hospital in London. The princess is fourth in line to the throne after her grandfather, father and elder brother. She is subsequently named Charlotte Elizabeth Diana.
  • 7 May –
  • The 2015 general election takes place, resulting in the Conservative Party winning an outright majority with 331 seats, and securing David Cameron a second term in office. Meanwhile, in Scotland, a huge surge to the Scottish National Party sees the party win 56 of the 59 seats available, a gain of 50 seats on their 2010 total. The Labour Party wins 232 seats across the UK, with modest gains in England more than offset by heavy losses in Scotland, while the Liberal Democrats are almost wiped out with just eight of their previous 57 seats remaining.
  • Local elections also take place in 279 councils across England, with the Conservatives gaining 25 councils to control 130 overall, the Labour Party lose four seats, leaving them with 67 councils, while the Liberal Democrats lose four to control three councils.
  • 8 May –
  • Commemorations are held to celebrate the 70th anniversary of VE Day, the end of World War II on the continent.
  • Ed Miliband, Nick Clegg and Nigel Farage, the three respective leaders of Labour, the Liberal Democrats and the UK Independence Party, all announce their resignations in the wake of their election defeats. Farage's resignation is subsequently rejected after "overwhelming evidence" that members of his party disagreed with his decision to leave.
  • 13 May – Figures show that unemployment fell to 1.83 million in the first quarter, 35,000 down from the last quarter and the lowest in seven years.
  • 15 May – The Rail, Maritime and Transport workers union (RMT) announce that Network Rail workers will stage a 24-hour strike from 5.00pm on 25 May over pay and conditions, the first national rail strike in the UK for two decades. The strike is called off on 21 May after a pay deal is reached with Network Rail management.
  • 16 May – The Church of Scotland votes to allow the ordination of gay ministers in civil partnerships.
  • 19 May –
  • Charles, Prince of Wales begins his official four-day tour of Ireland with a controversial meeting with Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams.
  • Figures show that the main measure of inflation turned negative in April for the first time on record, falling to -0.1%.
  • Nine men are arrested, and eight charged the following day, in connection with the Hatton Garden safe deposit raid in early April.
  • 21 May – Cashless payments now exceed the use of notes and coins, with cash volumes expected to fall by 30% over the next 10 years, according to the Payments Council.
  • 22 May – An earthquake of magnitude 4.2 is felt across East Kent.
  • 28 May – The RMT calls two national strikes for June after failing to reach a deal with Network Rail management. A 24-hour strike will begin at 5.00pm on 4 June, and a 48-hour strike will take place from 5.00pm on 9 June. The strikes are suspended on 1 June after a 2% salary increase offer from Network Rail.
  • 30 May – In football, Arsenal win the 2015 FA Cup Final defeating Aston Villa 4 - 0 at Wembley.
  • June

  • 1 June –
  • The national rail strikes planned for 4 and 9 June are called off after a pay deal is reached.
  • Charles Kennedy, former leader of the Liberal Democrats, dies, aged 55.
  • 2 June – A serious collision on The Smiler ride at Alton Towers causes four people to be airlifted to hospital for their major injuries. The incident is one of the biggest to ever occur at Alton Towers, and the park is subsequently closed for several days pending investigations.
  • 6 June – Golden Horn, ridden by Frankie Dettori, wins the 2015 Epsom Derby.
  • 9 June – HSBC, the world's largest banking retailer, announce plans to cut 25,000 jobs worldwide, including 8,000 in the UK. It also plans to close some of its UK branches, and rename the HSBC brand in the UK.
  • 10 June –
  • Chancellor George Osborne announces government plans to sell off its stake in the Royal Bank of Scotland.
  • A nationwide poll to find a national bird for the UK has chosen the robin as the public's favourite candidate.
  • 11 June – A youth is detained by police after a male teacher is stabbed in front of students at a school in Bradford.
  • 13 June - Trooping the Colour takes place in London marking the Queen's official birthday. It is the Duchess of Cambridge's first appearance since the birth of Princess Charlotte. Prince George also makes his first appearance on the balcony of Buckingham Palace.
  • 14 June – A statue of Queen Elizabeth II is unveiled by Speaker John Bercow at Runnymede in Surrey ahead of the Magna Carta celebrations.
  • 15 June – The Royal Family, the Prime Minister, the Archbishop of Canterbury and other dignitaries attend a ceremony at Runnymede to mark the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta.
  • 18 June – A Government report reveals that the Palace of Westminster is in need of repair and recommends that MPs leave the building for two years in order for the repairs to be carried out.
  • 20 June – Some 250,000 people take to the streets in cities such as London, Bristol and Manchester in a demonstration backed by the People's Assembly Against Austerity, to protest against the Government's austerity program.
  • 24 June – It is announced that Buckingham Palace is in need of repair and the Royal Household debates on whether the Queen should move to Windsor Castle.
  • 25 June – The UK population grew by almost 500,000 to reach 64,596,800 in 2014 – an above average increase compared with rises over the last decade – according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS). The percentage of older people continues to increase and the median age is now 40 years, the highest ever recorded.
  • 26 June – At least 30 Britons are among 37 people believed dead after a terrorist attack on a beach near the Tunisian resort town of Sousse.
  • 28 June –
  • The 14th Dalai Lama makes an appearance at the 2015 Glastonbury Festival, praising the event as "a festival of people, not governments or politicians".
  • A coach driver from Northern Ireland is killed and several teachers and schoolchildren from Brentwood in Essex are injured after a coach crashes near Ostend in Belgium.
  • 29 June – A major planning application by energy firm Cuadrilla to begin fracking in Lancashire is rejected by the council.
  • 30 June –
  • Police officers, intelligence officials, soldiers and emergency services take part in a counter-terrorism exercise, codenamed Strong Tower, in London. The terror attack simulation has been six months in the planning, and is the country's largest counter-terrorism exercise to date.
  • A leap second occurs meaning master clocks read 11:59:60 as clocks wait for a second to allow the Earth’s rotation to catch up with atomic time.
  • July

  • 1 July – A level three "heatwave action" heat-health alert is declared by the Met Office, as a temperature of 36.7 degrees is recorded at Heathrow in London; the hottest UK temperature in twelve years and the hottest July day on record.
  • 3 July –
  • Across the UK, a one-minute silence is held at midday to remember the 38 victims – including 30 British people – who died in the Tunisia beach attack a week earlier.
  • Production is suspended at the last substantial coal mine in Wales, Aberpergwm.
  • 4 July – England finish third in the 2015 Women's World Cup after defeating Germany 1–0 in the third place play-off.
  • 5 July –
  • Lewis Hamilton wins the 2015 British Grand Prix.
  • UNESCO gives the Forth Bridge the status of a World Heritage Site.
  • Christening of HRH Princess Charlotte of Cambridge at the St Mary Magdalene Church on the Sandringham House Estate in Norfolk. Among the godparents is Lady Sarah Fellowes, a niece of Diana, Princess of Wales
  • 6 July – A major incident is declared by Sussex Police after two people are left with life-threatening injuries as two double-decker buses collide on North Street, Brighton.
  • 7 July – The UK marks the 10th anniversary of the 7/7 attacks with memorial services and a minute's silence.
  • 8 July – As part of his first Conservative Budget, the Chancellor George Osborne unveils billions in welfare cuts, but also announces a National Living Wage of £9 an hour by 2020.
  • 9 July – Tube and train strikes cause travel chaos in and around London, with the entire London Underground network shut down and many rail services cancelled.
  • 10 July – Thousands of British holidaymakers begin to return home from Tunisia after a warning from the Foreign Office that another terror attack is "highly likely".
  • 13 July – Hundreds of flights are disrupted at Heathrow Airport in London after members of the climate change protest group Plane Stupid break through the metal fence, get onto the northern runway, and chain themselves together in protest.
  • 16 July – Tim Farron is elected the new leader of the Liberal Democrats.
  • 17 July –
  • The first female genital mutilation protection order in the UK is obtained by Bedfordshire Police, preventing two young girls thought to be at risk from travelling to Africa.
  • Four people are thought to be trapped and four others are taken to hospital after three explosions at a wood treatment works in Bosley near Macclesfield in Cheshire.
  • 20 July – In golf, Zach Johnson of the USA wins the 2015 Open Championship, the 144th edition of the tournament, at St Andrews, Fife, defeating South Africa's Louis Oosthuizen and Marc Leishman of Australia in a playoff.
  • 21 July – Chancellor George Osborne launches a spending review that calls for £20bn of cuts to Whitehall budgets. Each unprotected department is asked to create savings plans of between 25% and 40% of their budget.
  • 22 July – The University of Birmingham finds in its archives the oldest known surviving fragments of the Koran, and plans to put them on public display.
  • 26 July – Great Britain's Chris Froome wins the 2015 Tour de France. This is Froome's second victory in the event, having also won the race in 2013, and marks the third time in four years that the event has been won by a British rider.
  • 27 July –
  • A train is derailed at Chilham in Kent after hitting cows on the line, but the passengers manage to escape unharmed.
  • The Metropolitan Police launch a criminal investigation after Lord Sewel, the former Deputy Lords Speaker, is filmed allegedly taking cocaine with prostitutes.
  • 28 July – The Eurotunnel migrant crisis worsens as it's reported that 2,000 migrants tried to enter the Channel Tunnel terminal in Calais in an attempt to reach the UK the previous night.
  • 31 July – A private jet crashes at a car auction site near Blackbushe Airport in Hampshire, killing its pilot and three passengers.
  • August

  • August – Arden University relaunched as a distance learning degree-granting institution under this name.
  • 1 August – Singer and television star Cilla Black, whose showbiz career spanned over 50 years, dies at her villa in Spain, at the age of 72.
  • 4 August – Former Prime Minister Sir Edward Heath (d. 2005) is investigated by police forces as part of their inquiries into allegations of historical child abuse.
  • 6 August – A second transport workers' strike causes chaos in London, with the entire London Underground network shut down.
  • 10 August – The youth who stabbed teacher Vincent Uzomah at a Bradford school on 11 June is sentenced to eleven years' detention.
  • 15 August – Commemorations are held to celebrate the 70th anniversary of VJ Day, the end of World War II in the Far East.
  • 17 August – The London Borough of Lambeth becomes the first council in the United Kingdom to ban the use of laughing gas for recreational use.
  • 18 August – One Briton is confirmed to be amongst the 20 killed during the Ratchaprasong bombing in Bangkok, Thailand, which occurred the previous day.
  • 20 August – Hundreds of fans, family and fellow stars turn out to pay their respects to singer and television star, Cilla Black, at her funeral in Liverpool.
  • 22 August – An RAF Hawker Hunter crashes into vehicles on the A27 near Shoreham in West Sussex during the Shoreham Airshow; eleven people are killed and fourteen injured.
  • 24 August –
  • British IT consultant Chris Norman is awarded the Légion d'Honneur, France's highest decoration, for his bravery in the 2015 Thalys train attack in France.
  • British IndyCar driver Justin Wilson dies in hospital after an accident during a race at the Pocono Raceway in Pennsylvania, United States.
  • September

  • 4 September – David Cameron announces that the UK is to provide resettlement to thousands more Syrian refugees in response to the worsening migrant crisis.
  • 6 September –
  • Rail transport returns to the Scottish Borders after 46 years with the reopening of the Waverley Route between Edinburgh and Tweedbank, under the name of the Borders Railway.
  • Homeowners in Lancashire are told that their water supplies are safe and back to normal after a microbial parasite contaminated drinking water for more than three weeks.
  • The Lieutenant Governor of Guernsey, Peter Walker, dies in office.
  • 7 September – Two British Islamic State jihadists, who were planning "barbaric" attacks on British soil, are confirmed dead after the first targeted UK drone attack on a British citizen last month.
  • 9 September – Queen Elizabeth II surpasses her great-great-grandmother Queen Victoria as Britain's longest-reigning monarch, as she declares the Borders Railway officially open.
  • 11 September – MPs reject plans for a right to die in England and Wales in their first vote on the issue in almost 20 years.
  • 12 September – Jeremy Corbyn is elected the new leader of the Labour Party, with Tom Watson as deputy leader.
  • 15 September – A flypast takes place at Goodwood in West Sussex to mark the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Britain. A service to mark the occasion is also held at St Paul's Cathedral in London, attended by David Cameron, Jeremy Corbyn, and the visiting President of Poland.
  • 22 September – Chancellor George Osborne says during a visit to China that the country "must be the United Kingdom's number two export market".
  • 26 September – A fire damages the United Kingdom's largest mosque, the Baitul Futuh Mosque in Morden, London.
  • 28 September – Steelmaker SSI, owner of the Teesside Steelworks at Redcar in North Yorkshire, announces that it is to close, with the loss of 1,700 jobs.
  • 30 September –
  • Volkswagen announces that 1.2 million of its vehicles sold in the UK are affected by the software behind the emissions scandal, including cars with the VW brand, Audi, Seat, Skoda and VW vans.
  • David Cameron faces demands from campaigners to apologise and pay financial reparation for Britain's role in the historic slave trade in the Caribbean, during a state visit to Jamaica.
  • Doctors are granted approval by the Health Research Authority to carry out the first ten womb transplants in the UK, following the success of the procedure in Sweden.
  • October

  • 1 October –
  • A new law banning smoking in vehicles carrying children comes into force in England and Wales.
  • New consumer protections come into force under the Consumer Rights Act, guaranteeing a full refund for faulty goods up to 30 days after purchase.
  • 2 October –
  • A 15-year old British boy from Blackburn, who plotted to behead police officers at an Anzac Day parade in Australia, is sentenced to life in prison.
  • Denis Healey, former Chancellor of the Exchequer and Deputy Leader of the Labour Party, dies, aged 98.
  • 3 October –
  • A woman and an 8-year-old boy are killed and several others are seriously injured after a double-decker bus crashes into a supermarket in Coventry.
  • Two people are killed after their light aircraft crashes into a field near Chigwell in Essex.
  • 5 October –
  • England becomes the last UK country to introduce a 5p charge for plastic carrier bags at supermarkets.
  • Archaeologists start digging up the remains of a Spitfire that crashed in the Cambridgeshire fens in 1940.
  • 6 October – Merseyside Police begin a major search after one of their officers, David Phillips, dies the previous night after being hit by a stolen pick-up truck he was trying to stop.
  • 13 October – Home Office figures show that hate crimes in England and Wales have risen by 18% from last year; with 80% classed as race hate crimes, and others involving religion, disability, sexuality and transgender victims.
  • 15 October – The Stirling Prize, the United Kingdom's top architectural award, is given to Burntwood School in Wandsworth, London.
  • 16 October – SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon announces to the annual SNP conference that party membership now stands at 114,221.
  • 20 October – Michael Meacher, the Labour MP for Oldham West and Royton, dies in service.
  • 22 October – The voting rights of Scottish MPs are to be restricted after the Conservative Government wins a vote on its controversial 'English votes for English laws’ (Evel) plans.
  • 23 October – A “significant and sustained” cyber-attack is made on the website of telecoms firm TalkTalk, with personal and banking details of up to four million customers being accessed and the firm's CEO receiving a ransom email purported to be from the hackers.
  • 25 October –
  • The Royal Mint releases a special £5 coin to commemorate the 600th anniversary of the Battle of Agincourt.
  • Five people, all confirmed to be Britons, are drowned after the whale-watching boat Leviathan II sinks off Tofino in British Columbia, Canada.
  • 26 October –
  • Rachel Treweek, Bishop of Gloucester, becomes the first woman to take her seat as a bishop in the House of Lords.
  • The government suffers a major defeat in the House of Lords after its plans to cut tax credits are rejected by peers, who vote to delay the measures and compensate those affected in full.
  • 29 October –
  • A 16-year-old youth is detained by police after a fellow pupil is stabbed to death at Cults Academy school in Aberdeen.
  • It is projected that the UK population will increase beyond 70 million by 2027, mainly due to an ageing population and net migration.
  • 30 October – Shaker Aamer, the last British resident to be held in Guantanamo Bay, lands in the UK, having been detained for 13 years.
  • 31 October – A motorist dies and ten people are taken to hospital with injuries after a car collides with a bus near West Kilbride in Ayrshire, Scotland.
  • November

  • 1 November – A temperature of 22.4C is recorded in Trawsgoed, Ceredigion in Wales, making it the warmest November day on record in the UK, breaking the previous record set nearly 70 years ago.
  • 2 November –
  • Archaeologists accidentally discover a well-preserved family burial vault in Gloucester Cathedral.
  • Hundreds of police officers from all over the UK turn out to pay their respects at the funeral of Merseyside Police officer David Phillips at Liverpool Cathedral.
  • 4 November – A suspension of flights between the UK and the Egyptian holiday resort of Sharm el-Sheikh leaves many British holidaymakers stranded, following rumours that the Metrojet Flight 9268 on 31 October, in which many Russian tourists died, was caused by a terrorist bomb.
  • 5 November – A protest march by masked anti-capitalists in central London on Bonfire Night leads to three Metropolitan Police officers being taken to hospital with injuries. Six police horses are also hurt.
  • 6 November – Flights between the UK and Sharm el-Sheikh resume, bringing the stranded British tourists home.
  • 10 November – Storm Abigail is the first storm to be officially named by the Met Office. It leaves many travel services disrupted, schools closed, and 20,000 homes without power.
  • 11 November – The step-brother of murdered teenager Becky Watts, Nathan Matthews is found guilty of her murder and his girlfriend, Sauna Hoare, found guilty of Becky Watts' manslaughter.
  • 14 November –
  • One Briton is confirmed to be among the 129 people killed in a series of coordinated terrorist attacks in Paris the previous day, with fears of a "handful" more to be confirmed.
  • Gatwick's North Terminal is evacuated as a precautionary measure, in light of the terrorist attacks in Paris, after a man is arrested when a suspicious item is found at the airport.
  • The Department for Transport announces that all speed cameras in England currently painted grey will be repainted yellow by the end of October 2016.
  • A family of four are killed after their six-seater light aircraft crashes near Churchinford in Somerset.
  • 16 November – The UK joins the rest of Europe in a minutes silence in remembrance of the 129 lives lost, including one Briton, in the Paris terrorist attacks on 13 November.
  • 17 November – Prime Minister David Cameron promises the House of Commons a "comprehensive strategy" to win MPs' backing for bombing Islamic State militants in Syria as well as Iraq.
  • 18 November –
  • Thousands of homes are left without power as Storm Barney rips through parts of Britain.
  • Energy Secretary Amber Rudd proposes that the UK's coal plants should be phased out by 2025.
  • 21 November – Four Britons are believed to be among the seven people killed in a helicopter crash on the Fox Glacier in South Island, New Zealand.
  • 23 November – David Cameron holds talks with French President Francois Hollande about co-operation in the fight against Islamic State.
  • 24 November –
  • A Scottish National Party motion opposing Trident's renewal is defeated by 330 votes to 64, with most Labour MPs abstaining.
  • Alton Towers confirms that The Smiler rollercoaster crash, that seriously injured five people in June, was caused by human error.
  • British Airways and EasyJet cancel all flights between Sharm el-Sheikh and the UK until January following the suspected bombing of Metrojet Flight 9268.
  • 25 November – Chancellor George Osborne outlines his joint annual Autumn Statement and Spending Review for the financial year ahead, in which he surprisingly announces he is to scrap planned cuts to tax credits and vows to protect police budgets in response to the UK's heightened terror threat.
  • 28 November – Grant Shapps quits as Minister of State at the Department for International Development amid claims he failed to act on allegations of bullying following the apparent suicide of a youth activist in September.
  • 29 November – In tennis, Great Britain win the Davis Cup for the first time since 1936 after Andy Murray beats Belgium's David Goffin at the final in Ghent, Belgium.
  • December

  • 1 December – A fire damages a bar in Newcastle city centre, and one person, later confirmed as the owner, Brian Sandals, is found burnt to death.
  • 2 December – MPs vote 397 to 223 to authorise UK air strikes against Islamic State in Syria.
  • 3 December –
  • The UK launches its first air strikes over Syria with RAF tornado jets carrying out bombings against Islamic State-controlled oil fields.
  • The Oldham West and Royton by-election, caused by Michael Meacher's death in October, is held; Labour retains the seat with an increased majority of 7.3%.
  • 4 December –
  • The Rail Delivery Group announces that rail fares will rise by 1.1% in the new year in line with current inflation rates.
  • The Forth Road Bridge in Scotland is closed due to structural defects, and the Scottish Transport Minister, Derek Mackay, declares that it will not be reopened until January 2016.
  • 5 December –
  • A stabbing at Leytonstone tube station in East London, which leaves a man with serious knife injuries, is being treated as a "terrorist incident" according to the Metropolitan Police.
  • Storm Desmond batters the UK with high-speed winds and heavy rain, causing severe disruption. People are evacuated from their homes as flash flooding sweeps through parts of Cumbria, with police declaring a "major incident".
  • Plastic bag use in Tesco stores in England has declined by 80% since a new 5p charge was introduced, data suggests.
  • 9 December –
  • Election Court decide that although Liberal Democrat Alistair Carmichael had told a "blatant lie" in a TV interview, it had not been proven beyond reasonable doubt that he had committed an "illegal practice" that would invalidate his election.
  • MPs debate whether Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump should be banned from entering the UK after an online petition reaches over 100,000 signatures. This followed Trump making a statement about halting all Muslims from entering the United States, and claims he made that parts of London are "so radicalised the police are afraid for their lives".
  • Chancellor George Osborne announces a £50m fund for families and businesses hit by floods in Cumbria and Lancashire in the wake of Storm Desmond.
  • 10 December – The UK government announces that any decisions on whether to allow a new runway at Heathrow or Gatwick will not be announced until the summer of 2016.
  • 14 December – A 'huge rise' is reported in the numbers of newborn babies in England who are subject to care proceedings, with 2,018 in 2013 compared to 802 in 2008.
  • 15 December – British astronaut Tim Peake becomes the first Briton under the banner of the European Space Agency to set foot on the International Space Station.
  • 18 December –
  • Britain's last deep coal mine, Kellingley Colliery at Beal, North Yorkshire, closes; marking the end of the era of deep-pit coal mining in Britain.
  • Energy firm npower is fined £26 million over billing and complaint failures after it sent out incorrect bills and failed to deal with complaints, according to Ofgem.
  • 25 December – Storm Eva causes more intensive flooding in northern England, with homes evacuated in Lancashire and Yorkshire, and rivers overflowing in Manchester and Leeds.
  • 29 December – An 81-year-old woman is shot dead by a fellow octogenarian resident at the De La Mer House care home in Essex.
  • 30 December –
  • A husband and wife who plotted terror attack's in the London's Underground and Westfield shopping centre, nicknamed the 'Silent bomber' couple, are jailed for a minimum of 27 and 25 years.
  • Hundreds of homes are evacuated and thousands are left without power in Scotland and Northern Ireland as Storm Frank brings torrential rain and gales. More than a hundred flood warnings are issued across England, Wales and Scotland.
  • 31 December –
  • The New Years honours list is announced, with new knights, dames, MBEs and OBEs awarded for notable contributions to society.
  • More than 1,700 same-sex couples married in the first year after Scotland became the 17th country in the world to legalise same-sex ceremonies.
  • Publications

  • Frances Hardinge's young adult fantasy novel The Lie Tree, overall winner of the 2015 Costa Book Awards.
  • Paula Hawkins' novel The Girl on the Train.
  • E. L. James' novel Grey: Fifty Shades of Grey as Told by Christian.
  • Terry Pratchett's posthumous novel The Shepherd's Crown.
  • Jamie Oliver's cookbook Everyday Super Food.
  • Zoe Sugg's novel Girl Online: On Tour.
  • David Walliams' children's novel Grandpa's Great Escape.
  • May

  • 2 May – Princess Charlotte of Cambridge
  • January

  • 1 January –
  • Barbara Atkinson, 88, actress.
  • Matthew Cogley, 30, musician and songwriter (Failsafe).
  • Fiona Cumming, 77, actress and director (Doctor Who).
  • 2 January –
  • Danny Dunton, 90, speedway rider and promoter.
  • Bob Gilmore, 53, musicologist.
  • Roger Kitter, 64, actor ('Allo 'Allo!)
  • Derek Minter, 82, Grand Prix motorcycle and short-circuit road racer.
  • 3 January – Terence Ranger, 85, historian of Africa.
  • 4 January –
  • John McPhee, 77, footballer (Blackpool, Motherwell).
  • Bernard Williams, 72, film producer (A Clockwork Orange, Ragtime, Star Trek: Generations).
  • 5 January –
  • Khan Bonfils, 42, actor (Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace, Batman Begins, Skyfall).
  • Albert Firth, 77, rugby league footballer (Wakefield Trinity).
  • Ken Hale, 75, football player and manager.
  • Anthony Ledwith, 81, chemist.
  • Geoff Truett, 79, footballer (Crystal Palace).
  • 6 January –
  • Gene Kemp, 88, children's author (The Turbulent Term of Tyke Tiler).
  • Sir Basil John Mason, 91, meteorologist.
  • Lance Percival, 81, actor and comedian.
  • 7 January –
  • Michael Fisher, 68, solicitor.
  • Nancy Thomas, 96, television producer (Monitor).
  • 8 January –
  • Peter Hill, 83, footballer (Coventry City).
  • Richard Meade, 76, Olympic equestrian.
  • Ray McFall, 88, former The Cavern Club owner.
  • 10 January –
  • Brian Clemens, 83, screenwriter (Dr. Jekyll and Sister Hyde) and television producer (The Avengers).
  • Roger Wosahlo, 67, footballer (Peterborough).
  • 11 January –
  • Chic Littlewood, 84, New Zealand television personality.
  • Albert McPherson, 87, footballer (Walsall) and coach (West Bromwich Albion).
  • 12 January –
  • John Bayley, 89, literary critic and writer.
  • Steve Gold, 58, computer journalist.
  • Paul Morgan, 40, rugby union and rugby league footballer.
  • 13 January –
  • Sir Jack Hayward, 91, businessman.
  • Mike Marqusee, 61, writer and activist.
  • Ronnie Ronalde, 91, music hall singer and siffleur.
  • Trevor Ward-Davies, 70, bassist (Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich).
  • 14 January –
  • Danny Malloy, 84, footballer (Cardiff City, Dundee).
  • Darren Shahlavi, 42, actor (Arrow, Night at the Museum, Watchmen) and martial artist.
  • 15 January –
  • Ena Baxter, 90, food manufacturer (Baxters).
  • Archibald Kennedy, 8th Marquess of Ailsa, 58, peer, hereditary chief of Clan Kennedy.
  • Ethel Lang, 114, last person living in the UK who was born in the reign of Queen Victoria.
  • 16 January –
  • Bill Dodd, 78, footballer.
  • Ted Harrison, 88, painter.
  • Tony Ridler, 59, darts player.
  • 17 January –
  • Ken Furphy, 83, footballer and manager.
  • Louis Martin, 78, weightlifter, Olympic silver (1964) and bronze (1960) medalist.
  • Terence Miller, 96, palaeontologist.
  • 18 January – June Randall, 87, British script supervisor (The Spy Who Loved Me, A Clockwork Orange, The Shining).
  • 19 January –
  • Anne Kirkbride, 60, actress (Coronation Street).
  • Bob Symes, 90, inventor and television presenter.
  • 21 January –
  • Leon Brittan, 75, politician, Home Secretary (1983–85).
  • Martin Honeysett, 71, cartoonist and illustrator.
  • Frank Hooley, 91, politician, MP for Sheffield Heeley (1966–1970, 1974–1983).
  • Pauline Yates, 85, actress (The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin).
  • 22 January –
  • Douglas Cromb, 84, football administrator (Hibernian).
  • Joan Hinde, 81, trumpeter and entertainer.
  • 23 January – Barrie Ingham, 82, actor (The Great Mouse Detective, Doctor Who, A Challenge for Robin Hood).
  • 24 January –
  • Peter Bridges, 89, Anglican priest, Archdeacon of Southend (1972–1977), Coventry (1977–1983) and Warwick (1983–1990).
  • Frances Lennon, 102, artist.
  • 25 January –
  • Sir Robert Atkinson, 98, businessman and naval officer.
  • Pauline Fisk, 66. author.
  • Ian Towers, 74, footballer (Burnley, Oldham Athletic).
  • 26 January – Lee Spick, 34, snooker player.
  • 27 January –
  • Roger Cowley, 75, physicist.
  • David Landau, 67, journalist and newspaper editor (Haaretz).
  • Margot Moir, 55, singer (The Moir Sisters).
  • 28 January –
  • Francis Bennion, 92, lawyer.
  • Tommie Manderson, 102, make-up artist (An Age of Kings, Alien, The Killing Fields).
  • Beric Morley, 71, architectural historian.
  • Katharine Worth, 92, drama academic.
  • 29 January –
  • Terry Hollindrake, 80, rugby league player.
  • Noel Lister, 87, businessman (MFI Group).
  • Danny McCulloch, 69, bassist (The Animals)
  • Derek S. Pugh, 84, psychologist and business theorist.
  • Derek Robertson, 65, footballer (St Johnstone).
  • 30 January –
  • Johnny Goodman, 87, television producer.
  • Harold Hassall, 85, footballer (Bolton Wanderers).
  • John Hopkins, 78, photographer, activist and promoter (Notting Hill Carnival, International Times).
  • Howard Norris, 80, rugby union player (Wales national union team, British and Irish Lions).
  • Geraldine McEwan, 82, actress (Agatha Christie's Marple).
  • February

  • 1 February –
  • Sir Douglas Hague, 88, economist.
  • Gordon Murray, 87, politician.
  • Beryl Platt, Baroness Platt of Writtle, 91, engineer and politician.
  • Michael Saward, 82, Anglican priest and hymnist.
  • Marie-José Villiers, 98, WWII spy and countess.
  • 2 February –
  • Roy Little, 83, footballer (Manchester City).
  • Johnny Campbell, 86, footballer (Gateshead).
  • Sandra Chalmers, 74, broadcaster (Woman's Hour).
  • Ken Hawkes, 81, footballer (Luton Town).
  • 3 February – Sir Martin Gilbert, 78, historian and biographer, member of the Iraq Inquiry panel.
  • 4 February –
  • Richard Bonehill, 67, actor and stuntman (Doctor Who, Return of the Jedi).
  • Martin Green, 82, writer and publisher.
  • 5 February –
  • Sir Gordon Linacre, 94, newspaper executive and bomber pilot.
  • Jeffrey Segal, 94, actor (Fawlty Towers, Z-Cars).
  • 6 February – Carl Cunningham-Cole, ceramic artist.
  • 7 February –
  • Robert Gavron, Baron Gavron, 84, businessman and philanthropist, Labour life peer.
  • Brian Reynolds, 82, cricketer (Northamptonshire).
  • 8 February –
  • Stan Cowan, 83, rugby league player (Hull).
  • John Hart, 93, ballet dancer and artistic director (Ballet West).
  • Geoff Morris, 66, footballer (Walsall).
  • Andrew Rosenfeld, 52, businessman.
  • Sir David Watson, 65, academic and educationalist (University of Oxford).
  • 9 February –
  • Roy Harris, 83, linguist.
  • Drew McDonald, 59, professional wrestler.
  • Nicholas Mackintosh, 79, experimental psychologist.
  • Nick Sharkey, 71, footballer (Sunderland).
  • 10 February –
  • Sir Noel Davies, 81, chief executive (Vickers).
  • John Fox, 90, composer and conductor.
  • Sir William Lawrence, 5th Baronet, 60, peer.
  • Tom McQueen, 85, footballer (Accrington Stanley, Hibernian).
  • Anne Naysmith, 77, concert pianist.
  • 11 February –
  • Christopher Greener, 71, basketball player and actor.
  • Gus Moffat, 66, football player and coach.
  • 12 February –
  • Anthony Low, 87, historian.
  • Oliver Rackham, 75, landscape ecologist.
  • Steve Strange, 55, musician (Visage).
  • Mike Thresh, 84, plant pathologist.
  • 13 February –
  • John McCabe, 75, composer and pianist.
  • Dan Tunstall Pedoe, 75, cardiologist.
  • Hugh Walters, 75, actor.
  • 14 February –
  • Pamela Cundell, 95, actress (Dad's Army, EastEnders, A Fantastic Fear of Everything).
  • Sheila Girling, 90, British artist.
  • John D. Hargreaves, 91, historian.
  • Alan Howard, 77, actor.
  • Richard Perham, 77, molecular biologist.
  • 15 February –
  • Eileen Essell, 92, actress.
  • John Treadgold, 83, Anglican priest, Dean of Chichester (1989–2001).
  • 16 February –
  • Gavin Clark, 46, singer (UNKLE, Clayhill).
  • John Davies, 76, historian.
  • Brett Ewins, 59, comic book artist (Judge Dredd, 2000 AD).
  • Geoff Morris, 66, footballer (Walsall).
  • Sir Robert Wade-Gery, 85, diplomat, High Commissioner to India (1982–1987).
  • 17 February – George Mackie, Baron Mackie of Benshie, 95, politician, Liberal Democrat life peer.
  • 18 February – Allan Beard, 95, civil servant. (death announced on this date)
  • 19 February – Dennis Davis, 88, mountaineer.
  • 20 February – Sandy Whitelaw, 84, film producer and executive.
  • 21 February –
  • Meredydd Evans, 95, professor, musician and television producer.
  • Sir Anthony Grabham, 84, surgeon and army officer.
  • John Knapp-Fisher, 83, painter.
  • Christopher Price, 83, politician, MP for Birmingham Perry Barr (1966–1970) and Lewisham West (1974–1983).
  • Daniel Topolski, 69, rowing coach and commentator.
  • 22 February – Roger Cecil, 72, painter.
  • 23 February –
  • James Aldridge, 96, writer (The Sea Eagle).
  • David Freeman, 86, solicitor.
  • Gerald Lockwood, 87, English rugby league player.
  • John Rowlands, 76, author and novelist.
  • Dave Williams, 72, football player and coach (Newport County).
  • Andy King, 72, footballer (Kilmarnock F.C.).
  • 24 February –
  • Joseph Beltrami, 83, lawyer.
  • Geoffrey Owen Whittaker, 83, civil servant, Governor of Anguilla (1987–1989).
  • 25 February –
  • Terry Gill, 75, actor ("Crocodile" Dundee, Prisoner (TV series), The Flying Doctors).
  • Barry Newbery, 88, production designer (Doctor Who).
  • Chris Rainbow, 68, rock musician (The Alan Parsons Project).
  • Raymond Smallman, 85, metallurgist.
  • 26 February –
  • Bob Braithwaite, 89, Olympian trap shooter.
  • Brian Cumby, 64, British shipwright.
  • Sheppard Frere, 98, historian and archaeologist.
  • Victor Watson, 86, executive (Waddingtons).
  • 27 February –
  • Patrick Whitefield, 66, permaculturist.
  • Joanne Woollard, film art director (Gravity).
  • 28 February –
  • Clifford Edmund Bosworth, 86, oriental historian.
  • Sarah Foot, 75, journalist and author.
  • March

  • 1 March –
  • Malcolm Bennett, 56, poet and author.
  • William Bowyer, 88, painter.
  • Suzanne Farrington, 81, actress.
  • Stuart McGrady, 29, footballer (Ayr United, Queen's Park).
  • Matthew Young, 70, civil servant and executive (Panini Group).
  • 2 March –
  • Dennis Barker, 85, journalist.
  • Leslie Chamberlain, 81, English rugby league footballer.
  • Dave Mackay, 80, football player and manager (Tottenham Hotspur, Derby County).
  • Jem Marsh, 84, automotive engineer, co-founder of Marcos Engineering.
  • Mal Peet, 67, author and illustrator.
  • 3 March –
  • Ernest Braun, 89, academic and author.
  • Denis Coe, 86, politician, MP for Middleton and Prestwich (1966–1970).
  • Roy McCrohan, 84, footballer (Norwich City).
  • 4 March –
  • Ray Hatton, 83, author.
  • John Simopoulos, 91, philosopher.
  • 6 March –
  • Mick Clark, 78, rugby league player (Leeds).
  • Osi Rhys Osmond, painter and television presenter.
  • 7 March – Derek Day, 87, diplomat, Ambassador to Ethiopia (1975–1978) and High Commissioner to Canada (1984–1987).
  • 9 March – James Molyneaux, Baron Molyneaux of Killead, 94, Northern Irish Unionist politician.
  • 10 March –
  • Vic Harris, 69, snooker player.
  • Kenneth Smales, 87, cricketer and football administrator.
  • Stuart Wagstaff, 90, entertainer.
  • John Howard Wilson, 85, rugby union player.
  • 11 March –
  • Marni Hodgkin, 97, book editor.
  • Christopher Morris, 72, accountant.
  • Harri Pritchard Jones, 81, writer, critic, and psychiatrist.
  • 12 March –
  • Geoff Coffin, 90, footballer (Chester City).
  • Jim Rhodes, 69, golf player.
  • Terry Pratchett, 66, author (Discworld series).
  • Alice Teichova, 94, economic historian.
  • Sir Jerry Wiggin, 78, politician, MP for Weston-super-Mare (1969–1997).
  • 13 March –
  • Lilian Bader, 97, WAAF aircraftwoman and teacher.
  • Jenifer Haselgrove, 84, physicist and computer scientist.
  • Jeff Rees, 94, WWII RAF officer.
  • Vincent Wong, 87, British actor (Doctor Who, James Bond, Batman)
  • 14 March –
  • L. S. Cousins, 72, scholar in Buddhist studies.
  • Rosalind Dallas, 66, television graphic designer.
  • Milton Huddart, 54, English rugby league footballer (Whitehaven).
  • 15 March –
  • Robert Clatworthy, 87, sculptor.
  • Fritz Wegner, 90, illustrator.
  • 16 March –
  • Stuart Croft, 45, filmmaker and educator.
  • Andy Fraser, 62, musician (John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers, Free) and songwriter ("All Right Now", "Every Kinda People").
  • 17 March – Bob Appleyard, 90, cricketer (Yorkshire, national team).
  • 18 March – Shaw Taylor, 90, actor and television presenter.
  • 19 March –
  • David Harrison, 88, zoologist (Harrison Institute).
  • Peter Katin, 84, pianist.
  • Joy Tamblin, 89, WRAF officer.
  • 20 March –
  • Mary Clarke, 91, dance critic.
  • Eddie Mulheron, 72, footballer (Clyde, Durban United).
  • 21 March –
  • John Dymoke, 88, noble, Queen's Champion.
  • John Walter Guerrier Lund, 102, psychologist.
  • Sir Hal Miller, 86, politician, Member of Parliament (1974–1992).
  • Sir James Spicer, 89, politician, MP for West Dorset (1974–1997).
  • Jackie Trent, 74, singer-songwriter and actress.
  • Robert Williams, 89, chemist.
  • 22 March –
  • Derek Chinnery, 89, radio controller (BBC Radio 1).
  • Anthony Garner, 88, political organiser.
  • Helen Landis, 92, singer and actress.
  • 23 March –
  • Lil' Chris, 24, singer-songwriter, actor, and television personality.
  • Roy Douglas, 107, composer.
  • 24 March –
  • Ian Isles, 96, WWII army officer and actuary.
  • R. Geraint Gruffydd, 86, celtist.
  • 25 March –
  • Martyn Goff, 91, bookseller, administrator of the Man Booker Prize.
  • Jimmy McGill (footballer, born 1946), 68, footballer (Huddersfield Town, Hull City).
  • Jeannette Obstoj, 65, lyricist (Break Every Rule).
  • Allen Sheppard, Baron Sheppard of Didgemere, 82, industrialist and politician.
  • Ron Suart, 94, football player and manager (Chelsea).
  • 26 March –
  • Anne Bannister, 78, psychotherapist.
  • Albert Irvin, 92, abstract artist.
  • Ian Moir, 71, footballer (Manchester United, Wrexham).
  • John Renbourn, 70, guitarist (Pentangle).
  • 27 March –
  • Pauline Brockless, 85, opera singer.
  • Anthony Scrivener, lawyer.
  • 28 March –
  • Joseph Cassidy, 60, Anglican priest and academic, Principal of St Chad's College.
  • Denis Eadie, 98, WWII army officer.
  • Amos Ford, 98, forester.
  • Josie Jones, 57, singer (The Mighty Wah!).
  • Ronald Stevenson, 87, composer and pianist.
  • 29 March –
  • Romany Bain, 91, show-business journalist.
  • Gerry Hardstaff, 75, cricket player.
  • John Sheppard, 93, car designer.
  • Peter Tarsey, 77, Olympic diver (1956).
  • 30 March – Trevor Williams, 76, plant geneticist.
  • 31 March –
  • Ricky Marsh, 88, journalist.
  • Anthony Saxton, 80, advertising executive.
  • Dalibor Vesely, 79, architectural historian.
  • April

  • 1 April –
  • Cynthia Lennon, 75, wife of John Lennon (1962–1968).
  • Dave Ball, 65, musician (Procol Harum).
  • 2 April –
  • Hayley Okines, 17, progeria campaigner.
  • Dennis Marks, 66, television producer and music director.
  • Eugene Vielle, 101, air force officer and inventor.
  • 3 April –
  • Michael Birkett, 2nd Baron Birkett, 85, hereditary peer and film producer.
  • Nigel Boocock, 77, speedway rider.
  • Andrew Porter, 86, music critic.
  • Chris Plumridge, 70, golf writer.
  • Christopher Reynolds, 92, linguist.
  • Robert Rietti, 92, actor.
  • 4 April –
  • Bill Ellerington, 91, footballer (Southampton).
  • Sir John Read, 97, executive.
  • 5 April –
  • Maurice Fenner, 86, cricketer.
  • Tony Hutton, 82, Royal Navy officer.
  • Sargy Mann, 77, painter.
  • Louis Miles Muggleton, 92, physicist.
  • 6 April –
  • Dave Ulliott, 61, professional poker player.
  • Alan Wilson, 94, cricketer (Lancashire County Cricket Club).
  • 7 April –
  • Tom Coyne, 84, news broadcaster and television presenter (Top Gear).
  • Harry Dowd, 76, footballer (Manchester City).
  • Dickie Owen, 88, actor (Zulu).
  • Donald Smith, 81, cricket player (Cheshire).
  • Janet Turner, 78, architectural lighting designer.
  • 8 April –
  • Graham Howarth, 99, entomologist.
  • Billy Ronson, 58, footballer.
  • Ion Trewin, 71, editor, publisher and author.
  • 9 April –
  • Alexander Dalgarno, 87, physicist.
  • Moira Gemmill, 55, designer.
  • 10 April –
  • Ronald Hambleton, 97, broadcaster and music critic (Toronto Star).
  • Margaret Rule, 86, archaeologist.
  • 11 April –
  • Guy Hannen, 90, WWII army officer and auctioneer.
  • Peter Jones, 95, WWII army officer.
  • Sheila Kitzinger, 86, natural childbirth activist.
  • Viv Nicholson, 79, football pools winner.
  • 12 April –
  • Bill Etches, 93, WWII army officer (St Nazaire Raid).
  • Doug Gregory, 92, Royal Air Force officer and stunt pilot.
  • 13 April –
  • Ronnie Carroll, 80, singer and political candidate.
  • Tony Eldridge, 91, Royal Navy officer (Chariot manned torpedo).
  • Claire Gordon, 74, actress (Konga, Beat Girl).
  • Rex Robinson, 89, actor (Doctor Who, Yes Minister, Only Fools and Horses).
  • 14 April –
  • Gordon Preston, 89, mathematician.
  • Kathrine Sorley Walker, 95, ballet critic.
  • 15 April –
  • Joseph A. Bennett, 44, actor.
  • Margaret Harrison, 96, peace campaigner.
  • 16 April – Tommy Preston, 82, footballer (Hibernian).
  • 17 April –
  • Steve Beck, 58, executive, chairman of York City F.C. (2003-2004).
  • Brian Couzens, 82, music industry executive (Chandos Records).
  • Peter Graham, 60, cricketer.
  • Keith Shackleton, 92, painter and television presenter.
  • 18 April – Sir Christopher Alan Bayly, 69, historian.
  • 19 April –
  • Sir Raymond Carr, 96, historian.
  • Margot Duke, Marchioness of Reading, 96, British aristocrat.
  • Tom McCabe, 60, politician, Minister for Finance and Public Service Reform (2004–2007).
  • Michael J. D. Powell, 78, mathematician.
  • 20 April –
  • Tommy Graham, 72, politician.
  • Roy Mason, 91, politician.
  • Peter Howell, 95, actor (Emergency – Ward 10, The Lord of the Rings, The Prisoner).
  • 21 April –
  • Derek Vonberg, 93, British physicist. (death announced on this date)
  • Dave Walker, 73, footballer (Burnley, Southampton).
  • 22 April –
  • Dick Balharry, 77, conservationist.
  • Desmond Boal, 85, lawyer and politician.
  • Bernard Penfold, 98, British Army general, general manager of the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club (1972–1979).
  • 23 April – Sir Philip Carter, 87, football director (Everton).
  • 24 April –
  • Ken Birch, 81, footballer (Bangor City).
  • Valentine Lamb, 76, journalist (The Irish Field).
  • 25 April –
  • Arthur Brittenden, 90, newspaper editor.
  • Richard West, 84, journalist and author.
  • Colin Bloomfield, 33, radio presenter (BBC Radio Derby).
  • 27 April –
  • Jay Appleton, 95, geographer.
  • David Fletcher, 90, cricketer (Surrey).
  • Chris Turner, 64, football player and manager (Peterborough).
  • John Wimpenny, 92, aeronautical engineer.
  • 28 April –
  • Keith Harris, 67, ventriloquist.
  • James Watson, 78, novelist.
  • 29 April –
  • Gary Liddell, 60, footballer (Grimsby Town, Heart of Midlothian).
  • Barbara Reynolds, 100, scholar, lexicographer and translator.
  • Brian Sedgemore, 78, politician.
  • 30 April –
  • Ronald Senator, 89, composer.
  • Nigel Terry, 69, actor.
  • May

  • 1 May –
  • Jamie Bishop, 44, cricketer (Glamorgan).
  • Geoff Duke, 92, motorcycle racer, six-time Grand Prix world champion.
  • Alexander Kok, 89, cellist.
  • Paul Walter Myers, 82, classical record producer.
  • June Williams, 88, zoo owner (Chester Zoo).
  • John Tout, keyboardist (Renaissance).
  • Bob Wareing, 84, politician, MP for Liverpool West Derby (1983-2010).
  • Colin Whitaker, 82, footballer (Shrewsbury Town, Oldham Athletic).
  • 2 May –
  • Stuart Archer, 100, recipient of the George Cross.
  • Ryan McHenry, 27, film director and social media personality.
  • Nick Mead, 93, WWII Royal Navy officer.
  • Ruth Rendell, 85, crime novelist (Inspector Wexford series).
  • 3 May –
  • John Elders, 84, rugby union player (Leicester).
  • Alan Hall, 62, cell biologist.
  • Danny Jones, 29, rugby league footballer (Wales, Halifax, Keighley Cougars).
  • Elizabeth Raybould, nurse and nursing educator.
  • 4 May –
  • Ann Barr, 85, author (The Official Sloane Ranger Handbook).
  • William Wilson, 93, executive (Aston Martin).
  • 5 May –
  • Gerard Davison, 47, Provisional IRA commander.
  • Jimmy Jones, 87, footballer.
  • Ralph Lainson, 88, parasitologist.
  • Des O'Hagan, 81, politician (Workers' Party of Ireland).
  • Brian Sedgemore, 78, politician, MP (1974–1979, 1983–2005).
  • 6 May –
  • Errol Brown, 71, singer (Hot Chocolate).
  • Michael O'Brien, 67, historian of the American South.
  • 7 May –
  • Michael Barratt Brown, 97, economist and political activist.
  • Sir Sam Edwards, 87, physicist.
  • Maurice Flanagan, 86, businessman (Emirates).
  • Rigby Graham, 84, artist.
  • 8 May – Sir Edward Burgess, 87, British Army general.
  • 9 May – Christopher Wood, 79, screenwriter (Moonraker, Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins, The Spy Who Loved Me).
  • 11 May –
  • John Hewie, 87, footballer (Charlton Athletic).
  • Keir Millar, 11, junior race car driver.
  • Isobel Varley, 77, world's most-tattooed senior woman.
  • Derek Walker, 85, architect.
  • 12 May –
  • Mervyn Burtch, 86, composer.
  • John Dewes, 88, cricketer (Middlesex, England).
  • Sir Peter Fry, 83, politician, MP (1969–1997).
  • Robin Page, 82, artist.
  • 13 May –
  • Eric Bakie, 87, footballer (Dunfermline Athletic, Aberdeen).
  • Bert Hitchen, 76, railway preservationist.
  • 15 May – John Jarvis-Smith, 93, Royal Naval officer and shipbroker.
  • 16 May – Flora MacNeil, 86, singer.
  • 17 May –
  • Rex Garner, 94, actor and theatre director.
  • Don Smoothey, 96, actor and comedian.
  • 18 May –
  • Tommy Bing, 83, footballer (Margate F.C.).
  • Raymond Gosling, 88, scientist.
  • 19 May –
  • Jack Aspinwall, 82, politician, MP (1979–1997).
  • Joe Carr, 83, footballer (St Johnstone).
  • John Sadler, 74, sports journalist.
  • State of Bengal, 50, music producer and DJ.
  • 20 May –
  • Edward Adeane, 75, courtier, Private Secretary to the Prince of Wales (1979–1985).
  • Sir Brian Cubbon, 87, civil servant, Permanent Secretary of the Home Office (1979–1988).
  • Eileen Gray, 95, bicycle racer and Mayor of Kingston upon Thames (1990–1991).
  • Sir John Lea, 91, Royal Navy vice-admiral.
  • 21 May –
  • David Blake, 90, cricketer (Hampshire).
  • Ernie Hannigan, 72, footballer (Preston North End, Coventry City).
  • Mac Poole, 69, drummer.
  • Twinkle, 66, singer-songwriter.
  • Alan Woodward, 68, footballer (Sheffield United).
  • 22 May –
  • Sir John Horlock, 87, mechanical engineer and university vice-chancellor (Open University, University of Salford).
  • Terry Sue-Patt, 50, actor (Grange Hill). (death announced on this date)
  • Michael Osborne Waddell, 92, WWII army officer.
  • 23 May –
  • Moyra Caldecott, 87, writer.
  • Carole Seymour-Jones, 72, biographer.
  • 24 May –
  • Morris Beckman, 94, writer and anti-fascist activist (43 Group).
  • Tanith Lee, 67, science-fiction, horror and fantasy writer.
  • Dean Carroll, 52, rugby league footballer (Bradford Northern, Carlisle, Warrington, Batley, Doncaster)
  • 25 May –
  • Dewi Bridges, 81, Anglican prelate, Bishop of Swansea and Brecon (1988–1998).
  • Moc Morgan, 86, fly fisherman and naturalist.
  • 26 May –
  • William Davidson, 95, cricketer (Sussex).
  • Cyril Roger, 93, speedway rider.
  • 27 May –
  • Sir Gordon Hobday, 99, scientist and industrialist.
  • Andy King, 58, footballer (Everton).
  • 28 May – Johnny Keating, 87, musician.
  • 30 May –
  • Jake D'Arcy, actor (Still Game).
  • John Drinkall, 93, diplomat, British Ambassador to Afghanistan (1972–1976) and High Commissioner to Jamaica (1976–1981).
  • Hugh Griffiths, Baron Griffiths, 91, jurist and law lord.
  • Julie Harris, 94, costume designer (Live and Let Die, A Hard Day's Night).
  • Tony McNamara, 85, footballer (Everton, Liverpool).
  • 31 May –
  • Roy Ralph, 94, cricketer (Essex). (death announced on this date)
  • Christina Reid, 73, playwright.
  • June

  • 1 June –
  • Charles Jacob, 94, stockbroker.
  • Charles Kennedy, 55, politician, MP (1983–2015) and leader of the Liberal Democrats (1999–2006).
  • 2 June –
  • Martin Cole, 83, sexologist.
  • Dennis Fidler, 76, footballer (Halifax Town, Macclesfield Town).
  • Clemens Nathan, 81, humanitarian.
  • Kenneth Tempest, 93, WWII Royal Air Force navigator.
  • 4 June –
  • Allan Fryer, 60, musician (Heaven).
  • Marguerite Patten, 99, cookery writer and home economist.
  • Roy Stroud, 90, footballer (West Ham).
  • Dame Anne Warburton, 87, diplomat, British Ambassador to Denmark (1976–1983), Permanent Representative to the UN in Geneva (1983–1985), President of Lucy Cavendish College (1985–1994).
  • Ray Weigh, 86, footballer.
  • 5 June –
  • Alan Bond, 77, businessman.
  • Ralph Hyde, 76, curator.
  • Jill Hyem, 78, scriptwriter and actress.
  • Richard Johnson, 87, actor (The Amorous Adventures of Moll Flanders, Julius Caesar, The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas).
  • Nick Marsh, 53, singer (Flesh for Lulu).
  • 6 June –
  • Barry Albin-Dyer, 64, undertaker.
  • Colin Jackson, 68, footballer (Scotland, Rangers).
  • 7 June –
  • Ken Barrett, 77, footballer (Aston Villa).
  • John Hurry, 95, WWII air force officer.
  • Sir Christopher Lee, 93, actor and singer (Dracula, The Lord of the Rings, Star Wars).
  • Gwilym Prichard, 84, painter.
  • 8 June – Laurie Thompson, 77, translator.
  • 10 June –
  • David Bellotti, 71, politician and football executive, MP for Eastbourne (1990–1992), CEO of Brighton & Hove Albion.
  • Charles Wyndham Goodwyn, 81, philatelist, Keeper of the Royal Philatelic Collection (1995–2003)
  • 11 June –
  • Ian McKechnie, 73, footballer (Hull City).
  • Ron Moody, 91, actor (Oliver!, The Animals of Farthing Wood, EastEnders).
  • James Robertson, 86, footballer (Brentford).
  • Charles Williams, 90, Royal Navy rear admiral.
  • 12 June –
  • James Gowan, 91, architect.
  • Ernest Tomlinson, 90, composer.
  • 13 June – Graham Lord, 72, biographer and novelist.
  • 14 June – Phil Judd, 81, rugby union player (Coventry).
  • 15 June – Rosalind Rowe, 82, table tennis player.
  • 16 June –
  • Howard Johnson, 89, footballer (Sheffield United). (death announced on this date)
  • Bill Sirs, 95, trade unionist.
  • Catharni Stern, 89, sculptor.
  • 18 June – Brian Taylor, 78, footballer (Walsall, Shrewsbury Town).
  • 19 June – Jim Brailsford, 85, cricket player (Derbyshire).
  • 20 June –
  • Ian Bradley, 77, New Zealand navy officer and politician.
  • Michael Kidson, 85, schoolmaster (Eton College).
  • 21 June –
  • Jim Rowan, 79, footballer (Airdrieonians, Celtic, Partick Thistle).
  • Carl Thompson, 33, heaviest man in the United Kingdom.
  • Jules Wright, 67, theatre director (Royal Court Theatre).
  • 22 June –
  • James Carnegie, 3rd Duke of Fife, 85, nobleman.
  • Malcolm Colledge, 75, archaeologist.
  • 23 June –
  • Jack Asher, 88, shinty player and referee.
  • Elizabeth MacLennan, 77, actress, writer and stage practitioner (7:84).
  • Ajit Singh, 74, economist.
  • Sir Chris Woodhead, 68, educationalist, Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Schools in England (1994–2000).
  • 24 June –
  • John Palmer, 64, career criminal.
  • John Winn, 94, army officer.
  • 25 June –
  • Sir Graham Dorey, 82, judge, Bailiff of Guernsey (1992–1999).
  • Gordon Fearnley, 65, footballer (Bristol Rovers).
  • Patrick Macnee, 93, actor (The Avengers, This Is Spinal Tap, A View to a Kill).
  • 26 June –
  • Larry Carberry, 79, footballer (Ipswich Town).
  • David McAlister, 64, actor (Hollyoaks).
  • Norman Poole, 95, WWII paratrooper.
  • Denis Thwaites, 70, footballer (Birmingham City), victim of the 2015 Sousse attacks.
  • Michelle Watt, 38, television presenter (60 Minute Makeover).
  • 27 June –
  • John Fairhall, 86, journalist.
  • Chris Squire, 67, bass guitarist (Yes).
  • 28 June –
  • Ian Allan, 92, publisher (Ian Allan Publishing).
  • Edgar Dawson, 83, rugby league footballer.
  • Joe Lobenstein, 88, politician and Mayor of Hackney (1997–2001)
  • 29 June –
  • Bill Cross, 97, WWII soldier.
  • Joseph Bryan Nelson, 83, ornithologist.
  • Kauto Star, 15, British trained racehorse, dual winner of the Cheltenham Gold Cup.
  • Bruce Rowland, 74, rock drummer (Fairport Convention).
  • 30 June –
  • Edward Burnham, 98, actor (To Sir, with Love, 10 Rillington Place, Doctor Who).
  • Robert Dewar, 70, computer scientist (AdaCore).
  • Alex Scott, 85–86, actor. (death reported on this date)
  • July

  • 1 July –
  • Edward Greenfield, 86, music critic and broadcaster.
  • Mike Lesser, 71, mathematical philosopher and political activist.
  • Charles Notcutt, 81, horticulturalist.
  • Sir Nicholas Winton, 106, humanitarian.
  • Russell Wood, 85, cricket player (Gloucestershire).
  • 2 July – Jim Bradley, 94, athletics coach.
  • 4 July –
  • John Hinds, 35, motorcycle race doctor, anaesthetist and lecturer.
  • Anthony F. Upton, 85, historian.
  • Alan Walton, 79, biochemist and venture capitalist.
  • 5 July –
  • Andrew Alexander, 80, journalist (Daily Mail).
  • Sir Philip Goodhart, 89, politician, MP for Beckenham (1957–1992).
  • Joseph McKenzie, 86, photographer.
  • 6 July –
  • Terence Kelshaw, 78, Episcopal Bishop of Rio Grande (1989–2004).
  • Sir John Lambert, 94, diplomat, Ambassador to Tunisia (1977-1981).
  • Fraser Scott, 95, army officer.
  • 8 July – Lloyd Reckord, 86, actor and director.
  • 9 July –
  • Caspar Bowden, 53, privacy advocate.
  • Bill Foord, 91, cricket player (Yorkshire).
  • Bill Hunter, 95, political activist and author.
  • 10 July –
  • Rosemary Dinnage, 87, author and reviewer.
  • Peter Jones, 85, journalist and author.
  • Jimmy Murray, 82, footballer (Heart of Midlothian, Scotland).
  • Roger Rees, 71, actor (Cheers, The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, The West Wing).
  • Grahame Vivian, 95, army officer.
  • 11 July –
  • Joyce M. Bennett, 92, Anglican priest.
  • Mark Birdwood, 3rd Baron Birdwood, 76, peer and politician.
  • J.P.C. Roach, 95, historian.
  • 13 July –
  • Michael Rayner, 82, opera singer.
  • Martin Litchfield West, 77, classical scholar.
  • Eric Wrixon, 68, keyboardist (Them, Thin Lizzy).
  • 14 July – Olaf Pooley, 101, actor and writer (Doctor Who, Star Trek: Voyager, Sunday Night Theatre).
  • 15 July –
  • Aubrey Morris, 89, actor (A Clockwork Orange, Love and Death, The Wicker Man).
  • Harry Pitch, 90, harmonica player.
  • 16 July –
  • Denis Avey, 96, World War II veteran and memoirist.
  • Sir Jack Goody, 95, social anthropologist.
  • Brian Hall, 68, footballer (Liverpool).
  • 17 July –
  • Owen Chadwick, 99, rugby player, historian, and theologian.
  • Ray Jessel, 85, scriptwriter and songwriter (Baker Street).
  • John McCluskey, 71, boxer.
  • Nova Pilbeam, 95, actress (The Man Who Knew Too Much, Young and Innocent, Tudor Rose).
  • John Taylor, 72, jazz pianist.
  • 18 July –
  • Dave Black, 62, musician (Goldie).
  • Allan Willett, 78/9, soldier, businessman and Lord-Lieutenant of Kent (2002–2011).
  • 19 July – Samantha Cawkwell, 31, dressage equestrian rider.
  • 20 July –
  • Tom Beard, 50, actor (Salmon Fishing in the Yemen, Hereafter, Wallander).
  • Fred Else, 82, footballer (Preston North End).
  • 21 July – Mike Turner, 80, cricketer (Leicestershire).
  • 22 July –
  • Raymond Booth, 85, wildlife artist (death announced on this date).
  • Barbara Calvert, 89, barrister.
  • Eddie Hardin, 66, rock musician and singer-songwriter (Spencer Davis Group).
  • Natasha Parry, 84, actress (Romeo and Juliet, Oh! What a Lovely War, Meetings with Remarkable Men).
  • 24 July – Gordon Stuart, 91, artist.
  • 25 July –
  • Ernie Lewis, 91, rugby union referee and player.
  • Robin Phillips, 73, actor (Tales from the Crypt, Doctor Who).
  • 26 July –
  • Peggy Evans, 94, actress (The Blue Lamp).
  • Lee Harwood, 76, poet.
  • 27 July –
  • Edward Campbell, 71, rugby league footballer of the 1960s and 1970s.
  • Paul Langford, 69, historian, Rector of Lincoln College, Oxford (2000–2012).
  • Chris Lazari, 69, property developer.
  • Anthony Shaw, 85, army general, Director General Army Medical Services (1988–1990).
  • 28 July –
  • John M. Hull, 80, theologian.
  • David Leaning, 78, Anglican priest.
  • 29 July –
  • Antony Holland, 95, actor, playwright, and theatre director.
  • Sir Peter O'Sullevan, 97, horse racing commentator.
  • 30 July – Stuart Baggs, 27, reality television contestant and businessman (The Apprentice).
  • 31 July –
  • Coralie de Burgh, 90, painter.
  • Derek Turner, 82, English rugby league player (Wakefield Trinity).
  • August

  • 1 August – Cilla Black, 72, singer ("It's for You", "You're My World", "Step Inside Love"), television presenter (Blind Date, Surprise Surprise, The Moment of Truth) and actress.
  • 2 August –
  • Sammy Cox, 91, footballer (Scotland, Rangers).
  • Ken Jones, 85, author and Buddhist activist.
  • Ken Lewis, 74, singer and songwriter (Can't You Hear My Heartbeat).
  • 3 August –
  • Carol Brown Janeway, 71, translator.
  • Robert Conquest, 98, historian (The Great Terror).
  • 4 August –
  • Ken Barnes, 82, writer and record producer.
  • Arthur Dorward, 90, rugby union player.
  • 5 August –
  • Simon Burrows, 86, Anglican prelate, Bishop of Buckingham (1974–1994).
  • George Cole, 90, actor (Minder, St. Trinian's, Mary Reilly).
  • Mark Herdman, 83, diplomat, Governor of the British Virgin Islands (1986–1991).
  • Arthur Walter James, 103, journalist, editor of the Times Educational Supplement (1952–1969).
  • Tony Millington, 72, footballer (Wales, Swansea City, Peterborough United).
  • 6 August – Danny Hegan, 72, footballer (Northern Ireland, Ipswich Town, Wolves).
  • 7 August – Neville Neville, 65, cricketer and football club director (Bury).
  • 8 August –
  • Sir Alec Atkinson, 96, WWII air force officer and civil servant.
  • Ronald Gordon, 88, Anglican prelate, Bishop of Portsmouth (1975–1984) and Bishop at Lambeth (1984–1992).
  • Christopher Marshall, 66, doctor and cancer researcher.
  • 9 August –
  • Jack Gold, 85, film director (The Naked Civil Servant, Aces High).
  • David Nobbs, 80, novelist and comedy writer (The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin, The Two Ronnies, Fairly Secret Army).
  • Jonathan Ollivier, 38, ballet dancer.
  • Susan Sheridan, 68, voice actress (The Black Cauldron, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Noddy's Toyland Adventures).
  • 11 August – Philip Arthur Whitcombe, 92, cricketer and army officer.
  • 12 August –
  • Stephen Lewis, 88, comedy actor (On the Buses, Last of the Summer Wine, Don't Drink the Water).
  • Chris Marustik, 54, footballer (Wales, Swansea City, Cardiff City, Newport County).
  • John Scott, 59, organist and choirmaster.
  • 14 August – Jazz Summers, 71, music manager (Scissor Sisters, The Verve, Snow Patrol).
  • 15 August – Malcolm Craddock, 77, television producer (Sharpe)
  • 16 August –
  • Anna Kashfi, 80, actress.
  • Kitty McGeever, 44, actress (Emmerdale).
  • George Merchant, 89, footballer (Dundee, Falkirk).
  • 17 August –
  • William B. Bonnor, 94, physicist and mathematician.
  • Marlene Jefferson, 81, politician.
  • 18 August –
  • Beata Brookes, 84, politician, MEP for North Wales (1979–1989).
  • Hugh Courtenay, 18th Earl of Devon, 73, nobleman.
  • Russell Henderson, 91, jazz musician.
  • Charles Read, 57, mathematician.
  • Edgar Rumney, 78, footballer (Colchester United).
  • Roger Smalley, 72, composer.
  • 21 August –
  • Sir Bob Hepple, 81, legal scholar, Master of Clare College, Cambridge (1993–2003).
  • Denise Marshall, 53, equal rights campaigner
  • Gerry Steinberg, 70, politician, MP for City of Durham (1987–2005).
  • 22 August –
  • Tommy Lowry, 69, footballer (Crewe Alexandra).
  • Andy Mapple, 52, waterskier.
  • Eric Thompson, 95, racing driver.
  • Charles Tomlinson, 88, poet and poetry translator.
  • 23 August – Joanna Strathdee, 60, politician.
  • 24 August –
  • Justin Wilson, 37, racing driver.
  • Annette Worsley-Taylor, 71, fashion promoter.
  • 25 August –
  • Colin Fry, 53, TV personality.
  • Geraint Stanley Jones, 79, television executive (BBC Wales, S4C).
  • 26 August –
  • Junaid Hussain, 21, hacker and Islamist propagandist.
  • P. J. Kavanagh, 84, poet.
  • 27 August – Teresa Gorman, 83, politician, MP for Billericay (1987–2001).
  • 28 August –
  • John Buckingham, 72,chemist.
  • Lindsay Charnock, 60, jockey.
  • 29 August –
  • Robin Bilbie, 73, cricketer (Nottinghamshire).
  • Graham Leggat, 81, footballer (Aberdeen, Fulham, Scotland).
  • Ron Searle, 96, politician, Mayor of Mississauga (1976–1978).
  • Sir Kenneth Stowe, 88, civil servant.
  • 30 August –
  • George Fisher, 90, footballer (Millwall, Colchester United).
  • Brian Hord, 81, chartered surveyor and politician, MEP for London West (1979–1984).
  • Oliver Sacks, 82, neurologist and author (The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Awakenings).
  • David Williamson, Baron Williamson of Horton, 81, civil servant and peer, Convenor of the Cross-Bench Peers (2004–2007).
  • 31 August –
  • Joy Beverley, 91, singer (Beverley Sisters).
  • Edward Douglas-Scott-Montagu, 3rd Baron Montagu of Beaulieu, 88, nobleman.
  • September

  • 2 September –
  • Stan Kane, 86, actor (Storm).
  • Tessa Ransford, 77, poet and founder of the Scottish Poetry Library.
  • Roland Rees, 73, theatre director.
  • William Arbuckle Reid, 82, curriculum theorist.
  • 3 September –
  • Sir Adrian Cadbury, 86, businessman and rower.
  • Judy Carne, 76, actress and comedian (Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In).
  • Harold Drasdo, 85, rock climber and writer.
  • Dan Eley, 100, chemist (Eley-Rideal mechanism).
  • Ken Horne, 89, footballer (Brentford).
  • John Waller, 91, Anglican prelate, Bishop of Stafford (1979–1987).
  • 4 September –
  • Claus Moser, Baron Moser, 92, statistician.
  • Rico Rodriguez, 80, trombonist (The Specials).
  • Jonathan Woolf, 54, architect.
  • 5 September –
  • Colin Faver, 63, disc jockey and founder of Kiss FM.
  • Yotaro Kobayashi, 82, businessman (Fuji Xerox).
  • 6 September –
  • Ralph Milne, 54, footballer (Dundee United, Manchester United).
  • Peter Walker, 65, RAF officer and Lieutenant Governor of Guernsey (since 2011).
  • 7 September – David Cregan, 83, playwright.
  • 9 September – John Allen, 83, Anglican priest, Provost of Wakefield (1982–1997).
  • 10 September – Beryl Renwick, 89, radio broadcaster.
  • 12 September –
  • John Emerton, 87, Hebraist, Regius Professor of Hebrew at Cambridge University (1968–1995).
  • Malcolm Graham, 81, footballer (Barnsley, Leyton Orient, Queens Park Rangers).
  • Kenneth Leech, 76, Anglican priest and theologian, founded Centrepoint.
  • Bryn Merrick, 56, bassist (The Damned).
  • Ron Springett, 80, footballer (Sheffield Wednesday).
  • 13 September –
  • Brian Close, 84, cricketer (Yorkshire, Somerset, England) and footballer (Leeds United, Arsenal, Bradford City).
  • Barrie Meyer, 83, footballer (Bristol Rovers, Bristol City, Plymouth Argyle) and cricketer (Gloucestershire).
  • Raymond Mould, 74, property developer and racehorse owner.
  • Ted Smith, 95, nature conservationist.
  • 14 September –
  • Martin Kearns, 38, drummer (Bolt Thrower).
  • Bob Ledger, 77, footballer (Huddersfield Town, Oldham Athletic, Mansfield Town).
  • 15 September –
  • Keith Remfry, 67, judoka, Olympic silver medallist (1976).
  • Tommy Thompson, 86, footballer (Aston Villa, Preston North End).
  • 16 September –
  • David Ashby, 65, motorcycle speedway rider.
  • David Cook, 74, British broadcaster and writer.
  • Robert Kilpatrick, Baron Kilpatrick of Kincraig, 89, physician and life peer.
  • Allan Wright, 95, WWII airman and Battle of Britain veteran.
  • 17 September –
  • Sir Peter Heatly, 91, diver, chairman of the Commonwealth Games Federation.
  • Joe Maiden, 74, horticulturist.
  • Sir David Willcocks, 95, choirmaster and director of music at Choir of King's College, Cambridge.
  • 19 September –
  • Jackie Collins, 77, novelist.
  • Brian Sewell, 84, art critic.
  • 20 September –
  • Geoffrey Lilley, 95, British aeronautical scientist.
  • John Parker, 6th Earl of Morley, 92, aristocrat, Lord Lieutenant of Devon (1982–1998).
  • 21 September –
  • Juliet Clutton-Brock, 82, zooarchaeologist.
  • Kenneth L. Johnson, engineer.
  • Ray Warleigh, 76, saxophonist and flautist.
  • 22 September - Derek Ware, 77, stuntman and actor (Doctor Who, The Italian Job).
  • 24 September – Michael Howard, 67, pagan author and editor (The Cauldron).
  • 25 September –
  • Jim Meadowcroft, 68, snooker player and commentator.
  • Joe Wilson, 78, footballer (Workington Reds, Wolverhampton Wanderers).
  • 27 September –
  • Roland Collins, 97, painter.
  • John Guillermin, 89, film director and producer.
  • Frank Tyson, 85, cricketer, journalist and commentator.
  • 28 September –
  • Sir Peter Abbott, 73, admiral, Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff (1997–2001).
  • Valerie Ganz, 79, painter.
  • Alexander Faris, 94, composer.
  • 29 September – Gillian Gear, 72, English historian and archivist (Barnet Museum).
  • October

  • 1 October –
  • Illtyd Harrington, 84, politician.
  • Joe Wark, 67, footballer (Motherwell).
  • 2 October –
  • Brian Friel, 86, dramatist.
  • Alex Giannini, 52, actor (Elizabeth: The Golden Age, Legend).
  • Coleridge Goode, 100, jazz bassist.
  • Arthur Lawson Johnston, 3rd Baron Luke, 82, peer and politician.
  • Johnny Paton, 92, footballer (Brentford, Watford, Celtic), coach and manager (Arsenal 'A').
  • Fred Ridgway, 92, cricketer (Kent, MCC, England).
  • 3 October –
  • Denis Healey, Lord Healey, 98, politician, Labour MP (1952–1992), Secretary of State for Defence (1964–1970), and Chancellor of the Exchequer (1974–1979).
  • Christopher Tambling, 50-51, composer and choirmaster.
  • 4 October –
  • Jack McKee, 71, politician, Mayor of Larne (1984–1985).
  • Sir John Severne, 90, Royal Air Force officer.
  • 5 October –
  • Joe Henson, 82, farmer and conservationist.
  • Niall Rudd, 88, classical scholar.
  • 6 October – Trevor Lloyd, 91, rugby union player (Aberavon Quins, Maesteg).
  • 7 October –
  • W. R. Mitchell, 87, writer and editor (Dalesman).
  • Clive Young, 67, Anglican prelate, Bishop of Dunwich (1999–2013).
  • 8 October –
  • Richard Davies, 89, actor.
  • Jim Diamond, 64, singer-songwriter ("I Should Have Known Better").
  • Dora Holzhandler, 87, painter.
  • Hugh Scully, 72, television presenter (Antiques Roadshow).
  • 9 October –
  • Wil Handford, 24, mixed martial artist.
  • Gordon Honeycombe, 79, newscaster, author and actor.
  • Geoffrey Howe, Baron Howe of Aberavon, 88, politician, Conservative MP (1964–1992), Chancellor of the Exchequer (1979–1983) and Foreign Secretary (1983–1989).
  • Julia Jones, 92, scriptwriter (Quiet as a Nun, Our Mutual Friend).
  • 10 October –
  • Kane Ashcroft, 29, footballer (York City).
  • Sir David Penry-Davey, 73, jurist.
  • Maggie Riley, 79, actress (Hazell, Grange Hill).
  • 11 October –
  • David Hunt, 55, racing driver.
  • Carey Lander, 33, keyboard player and singer (Camera Obscura).
  • Andrew Sayers, 58, curator, Director of the National Portrait Gallery of Australia (1998–2010).
  • 12 October –
  • Paul King, 63, manager (The Police, Dire Straits).
  • Martin Lange, 71, football executive (Brentford).
  • Alexei Likhtman, 44, mathematician.
  • 13 October –
  • Duncan Druce, 76, composer and musicologist.
  • Sue Lloyd-Roberts, 62, television journalist (BBC, ITN).
  • Michael J. H. Walsh, 88, Army general and Scouting leader, Chief Scout (1982–1988).
  • Michael John Wise, 97, geographer.
  • 14 October –
  • Bobby Braithwaite, 78, footballer (Linfield, Middlesbrough, Northern Ireland).
  • Sol Roper, 79, rugby league footballer (Workington Town).
  • 15 October – Stella Sutherland, 91, poet.
  • 16 October –
  • David Drew, 77, ballet dancer.
  • Julia Wilson Dickson, 66, dialect coach (Braveheart, In Bruges, Chocolat).
  • 17 October –
  • Johnny Hamilton, 66, footballer (Hibernian, Rangers, St Johnstone)
  • Howard Kendall, 69, football player and manager (Blackburn Rovers, Everton).
  • Jacky Sutton, 50, journalist.
  • 18 October – Paul West, 85, novelist and poet.
  • 19 October –
  • Ron Greener, 81, footballer (Darlington).
  • Patricia Kern, 88, mezzo-soprano and voice teacher.
  • Dick Sharples, 88, scriptwriter.
  • 20 October –
  • Michael Meacher, 75, politician, MP for Oldham West (1970–1997) and Oldham West and Royton (1997–2015).
  • Don Rendell, 89, jazz musician.
  • Ian Steel, 87, cyclist.
  • Jane Wardle, 64, clinical psychologist.
  • 21 October –
  • Peter Baldwin, 82, actor (Coronation Street).
  • Francis Kiddle, 73, philatelist.
  • Norman W. Moore, 92, conservationist.
  • William Murray, 8th Earl of Mansfield and Mansfield, 85, nobleman and politician.
  • Diana Pullein-Thompson, 90, writer.
  • 22 October –
  • Ted Ingram, 95, paperboy, certified world's oldest. (death announced on this date).
  • Bryan Lowe, 89, cricketer (Cheshire).
  • Joe Moss, 72, music manager (The Smiths, Johnny Marr).
  • 23 October –
  • John Bossy, 82, historian.
  • Michel Couriard, 61, Jersey civil servant.
  • Antony Hignell, 87, sportsman.
  • Peter Price, 83, footballer (Ayr United, St Mirren).
  • 24 October –
  • John Adie, 69, festival promoter, co-founder of Two Moors Festival.
  • Sir Michael Beetham, 92, air marshal, Chief of the Air Staff (1977–1982).
  • Kirsty Howard, 20, fundraiser.
  • 25 October –
  • David Cesarani, 58, Jewish historian.
  • Ken Graveney, 90, cricketer (Gloucestershire).
  • Lisa Jardine, 70, early modern historian.
  • Matt Watson, 79, footballer (Kilmarnock).
  • 26 October –
  • S. Barry Cooper, 72, mathematician, computational theorist, author and activist.
  • Penelope Houston, 88, film critic, editor of Sight & Sound (1956–1990).
  • Sam Sarpong, 40, model and actor (Love Don't Cost a Thing, Farm House, Anchor Baby)
  • 27 October –
  • Philip French, 82, journalist and film critic (The Observer) and BBC radio producer.
  • Gulam Noon, Baron Noon, 79, food production businessman and chancellor of University of East London.
  • 28 October –
  • Diane Charlemagne, 51, singer (Urban Cookie Collective).
  • Lillian Ladele, 54, Christian rights activist, plaintiff in Ladele v London Borough of Islington case.
  • Nadia Menaz, 24, model.
  • Sir Gerry Neale, 74, politician, MP for North Cornwall (1979–1992).
  • 29 October –
  • Tony Van Frater, 51, musician (Red Alert).
  • Kenneth Gilbert, 84, actor (Doctor Who, House of Cards).
  • November

  • 1 November –
  • Bill Ballantine, 78, marine biologist.
  • Chris Leatherbarrow, 26, rugby league referee.
  • Stephen Hancock, 89, actor (Coronation Street).
  • 2 November –
  • Frank Budgen, 61, commercial director (Tag, Mountain).
  • Mike Davies, 79, tennis player.
  • Roy Dommett, 82, engineer and rocket scientist.
  • Peter Donaldson, 70, newsreader and radio broadcaster (BBC Radio 4).
  • Christopher Duggan, 57, historian.
  • Brian Lomax, football executive (Northampton Town) and founder of the Supporters Direct movement.
  • Rory MacDonald, 66, horse racing executive, MD of The British Racing School (1992–2014).
  • Arthur Shaw, 91, footballer (Arsenal).
  • Colin Welland, 81, actor (Kes, Straw Dogs) and screenwriter (Chariots of Fire).
  • 3 November –
  • Peter Bayley, 94, academic.
  • Tom Graveney, 88, cricketer (Gloucestershire, Worcestershire, England).
  • Paul Rose, 79, Labour politician and MP for Manchester Blackley (1964–1979).
  • 4 November –
  • Ian Greer, 82, political lobbyist (Cash-for-questions affair).
  • Leon Sinden, 88, actor (Taggart, Dr. Finlay's Casebook, The Avengers).
  • 5 November – Brown McMaster, 66, football executive (Partick Thistle, Stenhousemuir).
  • 6 November –
  • Bobby Campbell, 78, footballer and football manager.
  • Jonray Sánchez-Iglesias, 32, chef.
  • 7 November –
  • Richard Green, 74, photographer.
  • David Shawcross, 74, footballer (Manchester City, Stockport, Halifax). (death announced on this date)
  • 8 November –
  • Harry Clarke, 94, footballer and cricketer (Darlington).
  • Rod Davies, 85, astronomer.
  • Angad Paul, 45, manufacturing executive and film producer (Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, Snatch, The Tournament).
  • 9 November –
  • Brian Keighley, 67, physician and medical unionist (BMA).
  • Yolanda Sonnabend, 80, theatrical designer.
  • Andy White, 85, drummer (The Beatles).
  • 10 November –
  • John Carlill, 90, admiral, President of the Royal Naval College, Greenwich (1980–1982).
  • Klaus Roth, 90, mathematician, recipient of the Fields Medal (1958).
  • 11 November – Phil Taylor, 61, drummer (Motörhead).
  • 12 November –
  • Graham Atkinson, 77, cricketer (Lancashire and Somerset).
  • Jihadi John, 26, Islamic State propagandist.
  • 14 November –
  • Alan Davison, 79, inorganic chemist.
  • Warren Mitchell, 89, actor (Till Death Us Do Part, Death of a Salesman).
  • 15 November –
  • Saeed Jaffrey, 86, actor (The Man Who Would Be King, Shatranj Ke Khilari, My Beautiful Laundrette).
  • Jackie McGugan, 76, footballer (St Mirren, Leeds United).
  • Cynthia Payne, 82, brothel keeper.
  • 16 November –
  • Mel Ryan, 82, cricketer (Yorkshire).
  • David Steen, 59, newspaper and magazine photographer.
  • 17 November –
  • Guy Buckingham, 94, engineer and automobile designer (Nota).
  • Sir John Leahy, 87, diplomat, High Commissioner to Australia (1984–1988).
  • Terence Robbins, 81, rugby union and rugby league footballer.
  • 18 November –
  • Redvers Kyle, 86, television continuity announcer, voice-over artist and actor.
  • Jim Slater, 86, financier.
  • 19 November – Sir Naim Dangoor, 101, businessman and philanthropist.
  • 20 November –
  • Ronald Frankenberg, 86, British anthropologist.
  • Nancy Sandars, 101, archaeologist.
  • 21 November –
  • Peter Dimmock, 94, broadcaster (Sportsview).
  • Anthony Read, 80, screenwriter (Doctor Who).
  • 22 November –
  • Hazel Adair, 95, television writer (Crossroads, Compact, Emergency – Ward 10).
  • Robin Stewart, 69, actor (Bless This House, Cromwell, The Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires).
  • 23 November – Hazel Holt, 87, novelist.
  • 24 November –
  • Sir Robert Ford, 91, Army general, Adjutant-General to the Forces (1978–1981).
  • John Forrester, 66, historian and philosopher of science.
  • Aubrey Sheiham, 79, dental epidemiologist.
  • 25 November –
  • Sir Jeremy Black, 83, Royal Navy admiral.
  • Chris Martin, 42, civil servant, Principal Private Secretary to the Prime Minister (2012–2015).
  • Beth Rogan, 84, actress (Mysterious Island).
  • 27 November – Ian Dargie, 84, footballer (Brentford).
  • 28 November – Gerry Byrne, 77, footballer (Liverpool, England).
  • 29 November –
  • Wayne Bickerton, 74, songwriter ("Nothing but a Heartache", "Sugar Baby Love"), record producer, and music executive.
  • Jonathan Janson, 85, Olympic sailor.
  • Christopher Middleton, 89, poet and translator.
  • 30 November –
  • Alex Kersey-Brown, 73, rugby player.
  • Nigel Buxton, 91, travel writer.
  • Marjorie Oludhe Macgoye, 87, writer.
  • Leslie Waddington, 81, art dealer.
  • December

  • 2 December –
  • Bryony Brind, 55, ballerina.
  • Sir John Osborn, 92, politician, MP for Sheffield Hallam (1959–1987).
  • Anthony Valentine, 76, actor (Colditz, Coronation Street, Escape to Athena).
  • 4 December –
  • Norman Engleback, 88, architect.
  • Henry Hall, 87, physicist.
  • Rodney Milnes, 79, opera critic.
  • 5 December –
  • Willie Coburn, 74, footballer (St Johnstone).
  • Peter Cochrane, 96, WWII army officer.
  • William McIlvanney, 79, writer and poet.
  • 6 December –
  • Ian Burns, 76, footballer (Aberdeen).
  • Mick McLaughlin, 72, footballer (Hereford United, Newport County)
  • Nicholas Smith, 81, actor (Are You Being Served?, Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit, Doctor Who).
  • 7 December –
  • Kenneth Partridge, 89, interior decorator.
  • Shirley Stelfox, 74, actress (Emmerdale, Keeping Up Appearances, Coronation Street).
  • Peter Westbury, 77, racing driver.
  • 8 December –
  • Alan Hodgkinson, 79, footballer (Sheffield United).
  • Derek Hyatt, 84, landscape painter.
  • Johnny More, 81, impressionist (The Comedians).
  • Elsie Tu, 102, social activist, member of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong (1988–1995).
  • 9 December –
  • John Cockerton, 88, Anglican priest and academic.
  • Jenny Wormald, 73, historian.
  • 10 December –
  • Ian Bell, 59, journalist.
  • Walter Fawcett, 86, cricketer.
  • 12 December –
  • Jon Gadsby, 62, actor and comedian.
  • Sir Peter Gregson, 79, civil servant.
  • I. Howard Marshall, 81, theologian.
  • Ken Johnson, 87, Olympic athlete (1952).
  • John Scott-Scott, 81, aerospace engineer.
  • 13 December – Don Leaver, 86, television producer (The Avengers, Prime Suspect).
  • 15 December –
  • Tom Arden, 54, author.
  • Joe Lancaster, 89, footballer and trainer.
  • Kathy Secker, 70, television presenter.
  • Harry Zvi Tabor, 98, physicist.
  • 16 December –
  • Patricia Brooker, 80, reality television personality (The Only Way is Essex).
  • Peter Dickinson, 88, author.
  • Brian Keeble, 77, footballer (Grimsby Town, Darlington).
  • Harry Scott, 78, boxer.
  • 17 December – Gareth Mortimer, 66, musician (Racing Cars).
  • 18 December –
  • Rene Chapman, 109, centenarian and Scotland's oldest person.
  • Joe Gilmore, 93, barman.
  • 19 December –
  • Jimmy Hill, 87, footballer (Fulham), manager (Coventry City), trade union leader (PFA) and TV presenter (Match of the Day).
  • Harry Hyams, 87, property developer (Centre Point).
  • Greville Janner, Baron Janner of Braunstone, 87, politician, MP for Leicester West (1970–1997).
  • Alan Lee, 61, cricket and horse racing journalist.
  • 22 December – Derek Ezra, Baron Ezra, 96, coal industry administrator and Chairman of the National Coal Board (1971–1982).
  • 23 December –
  • Henry Crichton, 6th Earl Erne, 78, nobleman.
  • Don Howe, 80, footballer (West Bromwich Albion, Arsenal, England) and coach.
  • Sir Brian Tovey, 89, civil servant, Director of the Government Communications Headquarters (1978–1983).
  • 24 December – Dennis Griffiths, 82, newspaper executive (Evening Standard) and press historian.
  • 26 December –
  • Liam Clarke, journalist (Belfast Telegraph).
  • Ogwyn Davies, 90, painter.
  • Ed Dobson, 65, theologian.
  • 27 December –
  • Christopher N. L. Brooke, 88, medieval historian.
  • Andy M. Stewart, 63, folk singer (Silly Wizard).
  • Roy Swinbourne, 86, footballer (Wolverhampton Wanderers).
  • Stevie Wright, 68, singer (The Easybeats).
  • 28 December –
  • Ann Arnold, 79, painter.
  • John Bradbury, 62, drummer (The Specials).
  • Lemmy, 70, rock musician (Motörhead, Hawkwind).
  • 29 December – Edward Hugh, 67, economist.
  • 31 December –
  • Geoffrey Hawthorn, 74, British sociologist.
  • Felix Pirani, 87, theoretical physicist.
  • References

    2015 in the United Kingdom Wikipedia


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