Girish Mahajan

1960s in jazz

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1960s in jazz

In the late 1960s, Latin jazz, combining rhythms from African and Latin American countries, often played on instruments such as conga, timbale, güiro, and claves, with jazz and classical harmonies played on typical jazz instruments (piano, double bass, etc.) broke through. There are two main varieties: Afro-Cuban jazz was played in the US right after the bebop period, while Brazilian jazz became more popular in the 1960s. Afro-Cuban jazz began as a movement in the mid-1950s as bebop musicians such as Dizzy Gillespie and Billy Taylor started Afro-Cuban bands influenced by such Cuban and Puerto Rican musicians as Xavier Cugat, Tito Puente, and Arturo Sandoval. Brazilian jazz such as bossa nova is derived from samba, with influences from jazz and other 20th-century classical and popular music styles. Bossa is generally moderately paced, with melodies sung in Portuguese or English. The style was pioneered by Brazilians João Gilberto and Antônio Carlos Jobim. The related term jazz-samba describes an adaptation of bossa nova compositions to the jazz idiom by American performers such as Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd.

Contents

Bossa nova was made popular by Elizete Cardoso's recording of Chega de Saudade on the Canção do Amor Demais LP, composed by Vinícius de Moraes (lyrics) and Antonio Carlos Jobim (music). The initial releases by Gilberto and the 1959 film Black Orpheus brought significant popularity in Brazil and elsewhere in Latin America, which spread to North America via visiting American jazz musicians. The resulting recordings by Charlie Byrd and Stan Getz cemented its popularity and led to a worldwide boom with 1963's Getz/Gilberto, numerous recordings by famous jazz performers such as Ella Fitzgerald (Ella Abraça Jobim) and Frank Sinatra (Francis Albert Sinatra & Antônio Carlos Jobim), and the entrenchment of the bossa nova style as a lasting influence in world music for several decades and even up to the present.

1960–1964

  • 1961 – "Impressions". Composed by John Coltrane.
  • 1963 – "Once I Loved" (a.k.a. "Amor em Paz", also "Love in Peace"). Composed by Antonio Carlos Jobim with lyrics by Vinicius de Moraes (Portuguese) and Ray Gilbert (English).
  • 1961 – "One Note Samba" (a.k.a. "Samba de Uma Nota Só"). Composed by Antonio Carlos Jobim with lyrics by Newton Mendonça (Portuguese) and Antonio Carlos Jobim (English).
  • 1961 – "Stolen Moments". Composed by Oliver Nelson.
  • 1962 – "Corcovado" (a.k.a. "Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars"). Composed by Antonio Carlos Jobim with lyrics by Antonio Carlos Jobim (Portuguese) and Gene Lees (English).
  • 1962 – "Days of Wine and Roses". Composed by Henry Mancini with lyrics by Johnny Mercer.
  • 1962 – "Meditation" (a.k.a. "Meditação"). Composed by Antonio Carlos Jobim Newton Mendonça (Portuguese) Norman Gimbel (English).
  • 1962 – "Up Jumped Spring". Composed by Freddie Hubbard.
  • 1963 – "Blue Bossa". Composed by Kenny Dorham.
  • 1963 – "Bluesette". Composed by Jean Thielemans with lyrics by Norman Gimbel.
  • 1963 – "Four". Composed by Miles Davis.
  • 1963 – "The Girl from Ipanema" (a.k.a. "Garôta de Ipanema"). Composed by Antonio Carlos Jobim with lyrics by Vinicius de Moraes (Portuguese) and Norman Gimbel (English).
  • 1963 – "How Insensitive" (a.k.a. "Insensatez"). Composed by Antonio Carlos Jobim with lyrics by Vinicius de Moraes (Portuguese) and Norman Gimbel (English).
  • 1963 – "If You Never Come to Me" (a.k.a. "Inútil Paisagem"). Composed by Antonio Carlos Jobim with lyrics by Aloysio de Oliveira (Portuguese) and Ray Gilbert (English).
  • 1963 – "Oye Como Va". Written by Tito Puente.
  • 1963 – "Recorda-Me". Composed by Joe Henderson.
  • 1963 – "The Sidewinder". Composed by Lee Morgan.
  • 1963 – "Só Danço Samba" (a.k.a. "Jazz 'N' Samba"). Composed by Antonio Carlos Jobim with lyrics by Vinicius de Moraes (Portuguese) and Norman Gimbel (English).
  • 1963 – "St. Thomas". Composed by Sonny Rollins.
  • 1963 – "Water to Drink" (a.k.a. "Água de Beber"). Composed by Antonio Carlos Jobim with lyrics by Vinicius de Moraes (Portuguese) and Norman Gimbel (English).
  • 1963 – "Watermelon Man". Composed by Herbie Hancock.
  • 1964 – "Cantaloupe Island". Composed by Herbie Hancock.
  • 1964 – "Inner Urge". Composed by Joe Henderson.
  • 1964 – "JuJu". Composed by Wayne Shorter.
  • 1964 – "Mahjong". Composed by Wayne Shorter.
  • 1964 – "Song for My Father". Composed by Horace Silver.
  • 1965–1969

  • 1965 – "Ceora". Written by Lee Morgan.
  • 1965 – "Dindi". Composed by Antonio Carlos Jobim with lyrics by Aloysio de Oliveira (Portuguese) Ray Gilbert (English).
  • 1965 – "Dolphin Dance". Composed by Herbie Hancock.
  • 1965 – "E.S.P.". Composed by Wayne Shorter.
  • 1965 – "The Gentle Rain" (a.k.a. "Chuva Delicada"). Written by Luiz Bonfá with English lyrics by Matt Dubey.
  • 1965 – "The Gift!" (a.k.a. "Recado Bossa Nova"). Composed by Djalma Ferreira, with lyrics by Luiz Antônio (Portuguese) Paul Francis Webster (English).
  • 1965 – "Maiden Voyage". Modal jazz composition by Herbie Hancock from his album Maiden Voyage. It was used in a Fabergé commercial and originally called "TV Jingle".
  • 1965 – "Speak No Evil". Wayne Shorter.
  • 1966 – "Footprints". Composed by Wayne Shorter.
  • 1966 – "Mercy, Mercy, Mercy". Composed by Joe Zawinul with lyrics by Johnny "Guitar" Watson and Larry Williams.
  • 1966 – "Summer Samba" (a.k.a. "Samba de Verão", also "So Nice") Composed by Marcos Valle with lyrics by Paulo Sérgio Valle (Portuguese) Norman Gimbel (English).
  • 1967 – "Freedom Jazz Dance". Composed by Eddie Harris.
  • 1967 – "Triste". Written by Antonio Carlos Jobim.
  • 1967 – "Wave" (a.k.a. "Vou Te Contar"). Written by Antonio Carlos Jobim.
  • Events

  • The Cannonball Adderley Quintet records At the Lighthouse at the Lighthouse Café in Hermosa Beach, California.
  • Births

  • Branford Marsalis (August 26, 1960-), saxophonist
  • Deaths

  • Beverly Kenney (January 29, 1932 - April 13, 1960), singer
  • Oscar Pettiford (September 30, 1922 – September 8, 1960)
  • Awards

  • Grammy Awards of 1960
  • Best Jazz Performance Solo or Small Group
  • Jonah Jones for I Dig Chicks
  • Events

  • Several recordings are made at the Lighthouse Café in Hermosa Beach, California: Curtis Amy, Tippin' on Through; The Jazz Crusaders, The Jazz Crusaders at the Lighthouse.
  • Deaths

  • Doug Watkins (March 2, 1934 – February 5, 1962)
  • Deaths

  • Dinah Washington (August 29, 1924 – December 14, 1963)
  • Sonny Clark (July 21, 1931 – January 13, 1963)
  • Ike Quebec (August 17, 1918 - January 16, 1963)
  • Herbie Nichols (January 3, 1919 – April 12, 1963)
  • Deaths

  • Eric Dolphy (June 20, 1928 – June 29, 1964), American alto saxophonist, flautist, and bass clarinetist
  • Jack Teagarden (August 20, 1905 – January 15, 1964)
  • Cecil Scott (November 22, 1905 - January 5, 1964
  • Deaths

  • Nat King Cole (March 17, 1919 – February 15, 1965)
  • Tadd Dameron (February 21, 1917 – March 8, 1965)
  • Claude Thornhill (August 10, 1908 – July 1, 1965)
  • Earl Bostic (April 25, 1913 – October 28, 1965)
  • Births

  • Sylvain Luc (April 7), French guitarist
  • Events

  • The Jazz Crusaders record Live at the Lighthouse '66 at the Lighthouse Café in Hermosa Beach, California
  • Deaths

  • Bud Powell (September 27, 1924 – July 31, 1966)
  • Dave Lambert (June 19, 1917 - October 3, 1966)
  • Billy Kyle (July 14, 1914 - February 23, 1966)
  • Births

  • Sascha Ley (September 13-), Luxembourgian singer
  • Births

  • Kyle Eastwood -bassist (May 19, 1968-)
  • Deaths

  • Wes Montgomery (March 6, 1923 - June 15, 1968)
  • Luckey Roberts (August 7, 1887 – February 5, 1968)
  • Events

  • Trumpeter Miles Davis uses a wah-wah pedal on Bitches Brew.
  • Births

  • Joshua Redman (February 1, 1969-), saxophonist
  • Deaths

  • Paul Chambers (April 22, 1935 – January 4, 1969)
  • Coleman Hawkins (November 21, 1904 – May 19, 1969)
  • Pee Wee Russell (March 27, 1906 – February 15, 1969)
  • References

    1960s in jazz Wikipedia


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