Trisha Shetty (Editor)

1834 in the United Kingdom

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1834 in the United Kingdom

Events from the year 1834 in the United Kingdom. Uniquely, four Prime Ministers serve during the year.

Contents

Incumbents

  • Monarch - William IV
  • Prime Minister -
  • until 16 July: Earl Grey (Whig)
  • 16 July-14 November: Lord Melbourne (Whig)
  • 14 November-10 December: Duke of Wellington (Tory)
  • starting 10 December: Robert Peel (Tory)
  • Events

  • February - Robert Owen organises the Grand National Consolidated Trades Union.
  • March - William Whewell (anonymously) first publishes the term scientist in the Quarterly Review (but notes it as "not generally palatable").
  • 18 March - The Tolpuddle Martyrs, six Dorset farm labourers, are sentenced to be transported to a penal colony for forming a trade union.
  • 23 June - HMS Tartarus is launched at Pembroke Dock. It is the Royal Navy's first steam-powered man-of-war (a paddle gunvessel).
  • 16 July - Lord Melbourne succeeds Earl Grey as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.
  • 1 August - Slavery abolished in most of the British Empire by the Slavery Abolition Act 1833.
  • 14 August - Poor Law Amendment Act states the able-bodied cannot receive assistance unless they enter a workhouse.
  • 15 August - Parliament approves the creation of the colony of South Australia.
  • 7 October - Birmingham Town Hall, designed by Joseph Hansom and Edward Welch, is opened for the Birmingham Triennial Music Festival.
  • 16 October - Burning of Parliament: Much of the Palace of Westminster is destroyed by fire.
  • 14 November - William IV dismisses the government of Melbourne, after proposals for Church reform are made. The Duke of Wellington forms a caretaker government. This will be the last time a British sovereign chooses a Prime Minister contrary to the will of Parliament.
  • 10 December - Sir Robert Peel forms his first government.
  • 17 December - The Dublin and Kingstown Railway, the first public railway in Ireland, opens between Dublin and Kingstown.
  • 18 December
  • Tamworth Manifesto published: Peel outlines his guiding principles of government, regarded as the basis of the modern Conservative Party.
  • Tithe War in Ireland: "Rathcormac massacre": At Gortroe, County Cork, armed Constabulary reinforced by the regular British Army kill at least nine and wound thirty protesters against tithes.
  • 23 December - Architect and inventor Joseph Hansom patents the Hansom cab.
  • 26 December - Ursulines of Jesus take up residence at St Margaret’s Convent in the Whitehouse in Edinburgh, the first Roman Catholic convent established in Scotland since the Reformation; it will be another 5 years before the first such modern establishment in England.
  • Undated

  • The government begins to make grants of 50% towards the erection of new elementary schools in England and Wales.
  • Hanging in chains upon a gibbet after execution is abolished in England.
  • British East India Company monopoly on China trade ended.
  • The Exchequer is abolished as a revenue collecting department of the British government.
  • The Institute of British Architects in London, predecessor of the Royal Institute of British Architects, is formed.
  • Harrods founded as a grocer in Stepney in the East End of London.
  • Augustus Smith acquires the lease on the Isles of Scilly from the Duchy of Cornwall.
  • History of computing hardware: Charles Babbage begins the conceptual design of an "analytical engine", a mechanical forerunner of the modern computer. It will not be built in his lifetime.
  • With an average Central England temperature of 10.51 °C or 50.92 °F, this narrowly overtakes 1733 as the hottest calendar year in the CET record until equalled in 1921 and beaten in 1949.
  • Publications

  • W. Harrison Ainsworth's (anonymous) first novel Rookwood, an historical romance featuring the highwayman Dick Turpin.
  • Edward Bulwer's (anonymous) novel The Last Days of Pompeii.
  • Births

  • 28 January - Sabine Baring-Gould, hagiographer, antiquarian, novelist and eclectic scholar (died 1924)
  • 15 February - William Henry Preece, electrical engineer and inventor (died 1913)
  • 19 February - Charles Davis Lucas, Victoria Cross recipient (died 1914)
  • 16 March - James Hector, geologist (died 1907)
  • 24 March - William Morris, artist, writer, socialist and activist (died 1896)
  • 19 June - Charles Spurgeon, Baptist preacher (died 1892)
  • 28 June - Samuel Pasco, United States Senator from Florida from 1887 till 1899. (died 1917)
  • 4 August - John Venn, mathematician (died 1923)
  • 9 September - Joseph Henry Shorthouse, novelist (died 1903)
  • Deaths

  • 12 January - William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (born 1759)
  • 11 April - John 'Mad Jack' Fuller, philanthropist and patron of the arts and sciences (born 1757)
  • 12 July - David Douglas, botanist (born 1799)
  • 25 July - Samuel Taylor Coleridge, poet, critic, and philosopher (born 1772)
  • 1 August - Robert Morrison, Protestant missionary to China (born 1782)
  • 2 September - Thomas Telford, engineer (born 1757)
  • 16 September - William Blackwood, writer (born 1776)
  • 11 October - William John Napier, 9th Lord Napier, Navy officer, politician and diplomat (born 1786)
  • 5 December - Thomas Pringle, poet (born 1789)
  • 23 December - Thomas Malthus, demographer and economist (born 1766)
  • 27 December - Charles Lamb, essayist (born 1775)
  • References

    1834 in the United Kingdom Wikipedia


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