Girish Mahajan (Editor)

1825 in the United States

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1825 in the United States

The following are events from the year 1825 in the United States.

Contents

Federal Government

  • President: James Monroe (DR-Virginia) (until March 4), John Quincy Adams (DR/NR-Massachusetts) (starting March 4)
  • Vice President: Daniel D. Tompkins (DR-New York) (until March 4), John C. Calhoun (D-South Carolina) (starting March 4)
  • Chief Justice: John Marshall (Virginia)
  • Speaker of the House of Representatives: Henry Clay (DR-Kentucky) (until March 4), John W. Taylor (DR-New York) (starting December 5)
  • Congress: 18th (until March 4), 19th (starting March 4)
  • January–March

  • January 10 – Indianapolis becomes the capital of Indiana (moved from Corydon, Indiana).
  • February 9 – After no presidential candidate received a majority of electoral votes, the United States House of Representatives elects John Quincy Adams President of the United States.
  • February 12 – Treaty of Indian Springs: The Lower Creek Council, led by William McIntosh, cedes a large amount of Creek territory in Georgia to the United States government.
  • March 4 – John Quincy Adams officially succeeds James Monroe as President of the United States.
  • April–June

  • April 30 – Upper Creek chief Menawa leads an attack that assassinates William McIntosh for signing the Treaty of Indian Springs.
  • May 11 – American Tract Society is founded.
  • June 3 – Kansa Nation cedes its territory to the United States (see History of Kansas).
  • June 11 – The first cornerstone is laid for Fort Hamilton in New York City.
  • July–September

  • July 14 – The Jefferson Literary and Debating Society is founded by 16 disgruntled members of the now-defunct Patrick Henry Society in Room 7, West Lawn, of the University of Virginia.
  • August 19 – First Treaty of Prairie du Chien at Fort Crawford, Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin
  • October–December

  • October 26 – The Erie Canal opens, granting passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie.
  • November 7 – Treaty of St. Louis: 1,400 Missouri Shawnees were forcibly relocated from Missouri to Kansas. (See History of Kansas)
  • November 12 – New Echota designated capital of the Cherokee Nation.
  • November 26 – At Union College in Schenectady, New York a group of college students form Kappa Alpha Society as the first college social fraternity (it was the first to combine aspects of secret Greek-letter societies, literary societies and formalized student social groups).
  • Undated

  • The Cherokee Nation officially adopts Sequoyah's syllabary.
  • Vancouver, Washington is established by Dr. John McLoughlin on behalf of the Hudson's Bay Company.
  • Ypsilanti, Michigan is established.
  • Vicksburg, Mississippi is incorporated.
  • New Harmony, Indiana established as a social experiment, built by the Harmony Society and sold to Robert Owen.
  • The United States Postal Service starts a dead letter office.
  • Centenary College of Louisiana is founded in Jackson, Louisiana. The campus later moved to Shreveport, Louisiana.
  • Ongoing

  • Era of Good Feelings (1817–1825)
  • Births

  • April 7 – John H. Gear, United States Senator from Iowa from 1895 till 1900. (died 1900)
  • April 17 – Jerome B. Chaffee, United States Senator from Colorado from 1876 till 1879. (died 1886)
  • June 1 – John Hunt Morgan, Confederate general in the American Civil War (died 1864)
  • July 15 – Joseph Carter Abbott, United States Senator from North Carolina from 1868 till 1871. (died 1881)
  • August 10 – Edmund Spangler, carpenter and stagehand who was employed at Ford's Theatre at the time of President Abraham Lincoln's murder (died 1875)
  • November 9 – A. P. Hill, Confederate general killed in the American Civil War (died 1865)
  • December 18 – John S. Harris, United States Senator from Louisiana from 1868 till 1871. (died 1906)
  • December 30 – Newton Booth, United States Senator from California from 1875 till 1881. (died 1892)
  • Deaths

  • January 8 – Eli Whitney, Inventor of the cotton gin and milling machine.
  • June 1 – Daniel Tompkins, sixth Vice President of the United States from 1817 to 1825 (born 1774)
  • References

    1825 in the United States Wikipedia


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