Samiksha Jaiswal (Editor)

113th United States Congress

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Covid-19
Senate President  Joe Biden (D)
House Speaker:  John Boehner (R)
House Majority:  Republican
Senate Pres. pro tem:  Patrick Leahy (D)
Senate Majority:  Democratic
113th United States Congress
Members:  100 Senators 435 Representatives 6 Non-voting members

The One Hundred Thirteenth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, from January 3, 2013, to January 3, 2015. It was composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives based on the results of the 2012 Senate elections and the 2012 House elections. The seats in the House were apportioned based on the 2010 United States Census. It first met in Washington, D.C. on January 3, 2013, and it ended on January 3, 2015. Senators elected to regular terms in 2008 were in the last two years of those terms during this Congress.

Contents

Widespread public dissatisfaction with the institution increased over its second year, and some commentators have ranked it among the worst in United States congressional history. According to a Gallup Poll released in August 2014, the 113th Congress had the highest disapproval rating of any Congress since 1974, when data first started being collected: 83% of Americans surveyed said that they disapproved of the job Congress was doing, while only 13% said that they approved. In October 2013, during the government shutdown, this decreased to 10% approval according to several polls.

Major events

  • January 3, 2013: Election of Speaker. Incumbent Speaker John Boehner was re-elected despite the largest number of defections in the vote for speaker since at least 1991.
  • January 4, 2013: Joint session to count the Electoral College votes for the 2012 presidential election.
  • January 20–21, 2013: Second inauguration of President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden. The terms began January 20, but because that was a Sunday, the Joint Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies scheduled the inauguration ceremony for the next day.
  • February 12, 2013: Joint session to hear the 2013 State of the Union Address.
  • March 6–7, 2013: Senator Rand Paul led a filibuster of the nomination of John O. Brennan for Director of the Central Intelligence Agency with a 12-hour, 52-minute speech.
  • June 5, 2013: The first media reports of Edward Snowden's surveillance disclosures surfaced in the media.
  • June 25, 2013: The Supreme Court struck down section 4(b) of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 in Shelby County v. Holder, ending the need for some counties and states to receive "preclearance" from the Justice Department before changing election laws.
  • June 26, 2013: The Supreme Court struck down section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act in United States v. Windsor, forcing the federal government to acknowledge same-sex marriages granted under the laws of states.
  • July 16, 2013: The Senate reached a deal to allow some presidential nominations to come to a vote, avoiding the "Nuclear option" for filibuster reform.
  • September 24–25, 2013: Senator Ted Cruz delivered a 21-hour, 19-minute speech, one of the longest in Senate history, in opposition to the Affordable Care Act. Cruz's speech was not a filibuster, as it delayed no vote.
  • October 1–17, 2013: The United States federal government was shut down as most routine operations were curtailed after Congress failed to enact legislation appropriating funds for fiscal year 2014, or a continuing resolution for the interim authorization of appropriations for fiscal year 2014.
  • October 3, 2013: United States Capitol shooting incident
  • November 21, 2013: In a 52-48 vote, the Senate ended the use of the filibuster on all executive branch nominees, as well as on most judicial nominees. The filibuster remained in place for Supreme Court nominees and for legislation.
  • November 4, 2014: United States elections, 2014, including United States Senate elections, 2014 and United States House of Representatives elections, 2014.
  • Enacted

  • March 7, 2013: Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013, Pub.L. 113–4
  • March 13, 2013: Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Reauthorization Act of 2013, Pub.L. 113–5
  • March 26, 2013: 2013 United States federal budget (as Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013), Pub.L. 113–6
  • June 3, 2013: Stolen Valor Act of 2013, Pub.L. 113–12
  • August 9, 2013: Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act of 2013, Pub.L. 113–23
  • August 9, 2013: Bipartisan Student Loan Certainty Act of 2013, Pub.L. 113–28
  • September 30, 2013: Pay Our Military Act, Pub.L. 113–39
  • November 27, 2013: Drug Quality and Security Act, Pub.L. 113–54
  • December 26, 2013: National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014, Pub.L. 113–66
  • January 17, 2014: Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014, Pub.L. 113–76
  • February 7, 2014: Agricultural Act of 2014, Pub.L. 113–79
  • March 21, 2014: Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act of 2014, Pub.L. 113–89
  • April 3, 2014: Gabriella Miller Kids First Research Act, Pub.L. 113–94
  • April 3, 2014: Support for the Sovereignty, Integrity, Democracy, and Economic Stability of Ukraine Act of 2014, Pub.L. 113–95
  • May 9, 2014: Digital Accountability and Transparency Act (DATA), Pub.L. 113–101
  • May 20, 2014: Kilah Davenport Child Protection Act, Pub.L. 113–104
  • June 10, 2014: Water Resources Reform and Development Act, Pub.L. 113–121
  • July 23, 2014: Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, Pub.L. 113–128
  • August 1, 2014: Unlocking Consumer Choice and Wireless Competition Act, Pub.L. 113–144
  • August 7, 2014: Veterans' Access to Care through Choice, Accountability, and Transparency Act of 2014, Pub.L. 113–146
  • September 29, 2014: Preventing Sex Trafficking and Strengthening Families Act, Pub.L. 113–183
  • October 6, 2014: IMPACT Act of 2014, Pub.L. 113–185
  • November 26, 2014: Presidential and Federal Records Act Amendments of 2014, Pub.L. 113–187
  • November 26, 2014: Government Reports Elimination Act of 2014, Pub.L. 113–188
  • December 18, 2014: Death in Custody Reporting Act of 2013, Pub.L. 113–242
  • December 18, 2014: Transportation Security Acquisition Reform Act, Pub.L. 113–245
  • December 18, 2014: American Savings Promotion Act, Pub.L. 113–251
  • December 18, 2014: Credit Union Share Insurance Fund Parity Act, Pub.L. 113–252
  • December 18, 2014: EPS Service Parts Act of 2014 Pub.L. 113–263
  • December 18, 2014: Venezuela Defense of Human Rights and Civil Society Act of 2014, Pub.L. 113–278
  • December 18, 2014: Insurance Capital Standards Clarification Act of 2014, Pub.L. 113–279
  • Proposed

  • 2014 United States federal budget: H.Con.Res. 25, S.Con.Res. 8
  • Assault Weapons Ban of 2013 (S. 150) - Introduced after Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting
  • Justice Safety Valve Act of 2013: S. 619, H.R. 1695
  • Marketplace Fairness Act of 2013: (H.R 684, S. 743) - Also known as the "Internet Sales Tax"
  • Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act of 2013 (S. 744) - Also known as the immigration bill
  • Fiscal year 2014

    Fiscal year 2014 runs from October 1, 2013 to September 30, 2014.

  • Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2014 (H.R. 2216) - proposed
  • Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2014 (H.R. 2217) - proposed
  • Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2014 (H.R. 2609) - proposed
  • Fiscal year 2015

    Fiscal year 2015 runs from October 1, 2014 to September 20, 2015.

  • Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2015 (H.R. 4800) - considered in the House on June 11, 2014. The bill would appropriate $20.9 billion.
  • Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2015 (H.R. 4660) - passed the House on May 30, 2014. The total amount of money appropriated in the bill was $51.2 billion, approximately $400 million less than fiscal year 2014.
  • Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2015 - considered in the House on June 18, 2014. The bill would provide funding of approximately $491 billion.
  • Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2015 (H.R. 4923; 113th Congress) (H.R. 4923) - The bill would appropriate $34 billion to the United States Department of Energy, the United States Army Corps of Engineers, and related agencies.
  • Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 2015 (H.R. 4487) - passed in the House on May 1, 2014. The bill would appropriate $3.3 billion to the legislative branch for FY 2015.
  • Military Construction and Veterans Affairs and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2015 (H.R. 4486) - passed the House on April 30, 2014. The total amount appropriated by the introduced version of the bill is $71.5 billion.
  • Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2015 (H.R. 4745 or "THUD") - passed the House on June 10, 2014. The bill would appropriate $17 billion to the Department of Transportation and $40.3 billion to the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
  • Party summary

    Resignations and new members are discussed in the "Changes in membership" section, below.

    Leadership

    [ Section contents: Senate: Majority (D), Minority (R) • House: Majority (R), Minority (D) ]

    Senate

  • President: Joe Biden (D)
  • President pro tempore: Patrick Leahy (D)
  • Majority (Democratic) leadership

  • Majority Leader and Caucus Chair: Harry Reid
  • Assistant Majority Leader (Majority Whip): Dick Durbin
  • Caucus Vice Chair and Policy Committee Chair: Chuck Schumer
  • Caucus Secretary: Patty Murray
  • Senatorial Campaign Committee Chair: Michael Bennet
  • Policy Committee Vice Chair: Debbie Stabenow
  • Steering and Outreach Committee Chair: Mark Begich
  • Steering and Outreach Committee Vice Chair: Jeanne Shaheen
  • Chief Deputy Whip: Barbara Boxer
  • Minority (Republican) leadership

  • Minority Leader: Mitch McConnell
  • Assistant Minority Leader (Minority Whip): John Cornyn
  • Conference Chairman: John Thune
  • Conference Vice Chair: Roy Blunt
  • Senatorial Committee Chair: Jerry Moran
  • Policy Committee Chairman: John Barrasso
  • Deputy Whips: Roy Blunt, Richard Burr, Mike Crapo, Saxby Chambliss, Rob Portman, David Vitter, Roger Wicker
  • House of Representatives

  • Speaker: John Boehner (R)
  • Majority (Republican) leadership

  • Majority Leader: Eric Cantor, until August 1, 2014
  • Kevin McCarthy, from August 1, 2014
  • Majority Whip: Kevin McCarthy, until August 1, 2014
  • Steve Scalise, from August 1, 2014
  • Majority Chief Deputy Whip: Peter Roskam, until August 1, 2014
  • Patrick McHenry, from August 1, 2014
  • Conference Chair: Cathy McMorris Rodgers
  • Conference Vice-Chair: Lynn Jenkins
  • Conference Secretary: Virginia Foxx
  • Campaign Committee Chairman: Greg Walden
  • Policy Committee Chairman: James Lankford
  • Campaign Committee Deputy Chairman: Lynn Westmoreland
  • Minority (Democratic) leadership

  • Minority Leader: Nancy Pelosi
  • Minority Whip: Steny Hoyer
  • Assistant Democratic Leader: Jim Clyburn
  • Caucus Chairman: Xavier Becerra
  • Caucus Vice-Chairman: Joseph Crowley
  • Campaign Committee Chairman: Steve Israel
  • Steering and Policy Committee Co-Chairs: Rosa DeLauro (Steering) and Rob Andrews (Policy, until February 18, 2014); George Miller (Policy, from March 24, 2014)
  • Organization, Study, and Review Chairman: Mike Capuano
  • Senior Chief Deputy Minority Whip: John Lewis
  • Chief Deputy Minority Whips: Terri Sewell, Keith Ellison, Jim Matheson, Ben R. Luján, Jan Schakowsky, Diana DeGette, G. K. Butterfield, Debbie Wasserman Schultz, Peter Welch
  • Senate

    Senators are listed by state, and the numbers refer to their Senate classes.

    Committees

    [Section contents: Senate, House, Joint ] Listed alphabetically by chamber, including Chairperson and Ranking Member.

    House of Representatives

    Sources: H.Res. 6, H.Res. 7

    Joint committees

  • Economic: Kevin Brady, Amy Klobuchar
  • Inaugural Ceremonies (Special): Chuck Schumer, Lamar Alexander
  • The Library: Gregg Harper, Chuck Schumer
  • Printing: Chuck Schumer, Gregg Harper
  • Taxation: Max Baucus, then Ron Wyden, Dave Camp
  • Legislative branch agency directors

  • Architect of the Capitol: Stephen T. Ayers
  • Attending Physician of the United States Congress: Brian Monahan
  • Comptroller General of the United States: Eugene Louis Dodaro
  • Director of the Congressional Budget Office: Keith Hall
  • Librarian of Congress: James H. Billington
  • Public Printer of the United States: Davita E. Vance-Cooks
  • Senate

  • Chaplain: Barry C. Black
  • Historian: Donald A. Ritchie
  • Parliamentarian: Elizabeth MacDonough
  • Secretary: Nancy Erickson
  • Secretary for the Majority: Gary B. Myrick
  • Secretary for the Minority: Laura C. Dove
  • Sergeant at Arms: Terrance W. Gainer
  • House of Representatives

  • Chaplain: Patrick J. Conroy
  • Chief Administrative Officer: Ed Cassidy (until December 31), Will Plaster (starting January 1)
  • Clerk: Karen L. Haas
  • Inspector General:
  • Parliamentarian: Thomas J. Wickham, Jr.
  • Sergeant at Arms: Paul D. Irving
  • References

    113th United States Congress Wikipedia


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