Rahul Sharma (Editor)

1000 Park Avenue

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Alternative names  1000 Park
Town or city  New York City
Opened  1916
Main contractor  Bing & Bing
Architect  Emery Roth
Address  1000 Park Avenue
Country  United States
Construction started  1915
Floor count  12
1000 Park Avenue cdnimg0streeteasycomnycimage8027297680jpg
Type  Co-operative apartments
Current tenants  approx. 70-140 homeowners
Similar  Peoples Natural Gas Field, First Hungarian Reformed, 299 West 12th Street, Ritz Hotel Tower, 930 5th Avenue

1000 Park Avenue is an apartment building on the Upper East Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is located at the northwest corner of the intersection of Park Avenue and East 84th Street.

Contents

Map of 1000 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10028, USA

Overview

It was built in 1915-16 by the developers Bing & Bing from a design by Emery Roth. The brown brick structure is 13 stories tall with some Gothic-inspired stone and terra cotta decoration. Two carved figures in medieval dress near the main entrance are said to represent the Bing brothers. Across 84th Street is the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola.

The building is currently a co-op owned by its residents. There are 64 units.

Residents

Among the former residents of the building are James J. Rorimer, former Director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and Nicola Kraus, co-author of the 2002 bestselling chick lit novel The Nanny Diaries. She vehemently denies that Mrs. X, the mother in the novel, set at a similar Park Avenue building with a fictitious address, is based partially on women she worked for at 1000 Park. Most often speculated as the model for the character is Lisa Birnbach, a part-time CBS News correspondent best known for editing The Official Preppy Handbook in 1980, who has some similarities to the character in the book. Birnbach confirmed that Kraus had worked for her, but described her as "more of a play date for my daughter" than an actual nanny.

Another resident of 1000 Park named as a possible model for Mrs. X did not return phone calls from The New York Times requesting comment. Kraus did not think it inappropriate to use her former neighbors as models for her characters, but current residents of building disagreed. One even referred to Kraus as a "snitch" and suggested the co-op board should forbid residents from fictionalizing their neighbors' lives.

References

1000 Park Avenue Wikipedia


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