Trisha Shetty (Editor)

1 Corinthians 7

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Bible part  New Testament
Category  Pauline epistles
Order in the Bible part  7
1 Corinthians 7
Book  First Epistle to the Corinthians

1 Corinthians 7 is the seventh chapter of the First Epistle to the Corinthians in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. It is authored by Paul the Apostle and Sosthenes in Ephesus.

Contents

Text

  • The original text is written in Koine Greek.
  • Some most ancient manuscripts containing this chapter are:
  • Papyrus 15 (3rd century; extant: verses 18-40).
  • Codex Vaticanus (AD 325-350)
  • Codex Sinaiticus (AD 330-360)
  • Codex Alexandrinus (ca. AD 400-440)
  • Codex Ephraemi Rescriptus (ca. AD 450; extant: verses 1-17)
  • Papyrus 11 (7th century; extant: verses 3-6, 10-11,12-14)
  • This chapter is divided into 40 verses.
  • Structure

    This chapter can be grouped:

  • 1 Corinthians 7:1-9 = Principles of Marriage
  • 1 Corinthians 7:10-16 = Keep Your Marriage Vows
  • 1 Corinthians 7:17-24 = Live as You Are Called
  • 1 Corinthians 7:25-40 = To the Unmarried and Widows
  • Verse 6

    New King James Version

    But I say this as a concession, not as a commandment.
  • But I say this as a concession (KJV: But I speak this by permission)
  • Referring either to what Paul had said before, though not to all; not to (1 Corinthians 7:2) that for the avoiding of fornication, every man should make use of his own wife, and every woman of her own husband; since this is not by permission, but by command, (Genesis 2:24) that carnal copulation should be between one man and one woman in a married state; nor to (1 Corinthians 7:3; 1 Corinthians 7:4) for that married persons ought to render due benevolence to, and not defraud each other, having a power over each other's bodies, is a precept, and not a permission, (Exodus 21:10) but to (1 Corinthians 7:5) their parting for a time, and coming together again: it is not an absolute command of God that they should separate for a time, on account of fasting and prayer, but if they thought fit to do so by agreement, they might; nor was there any positive precept for their coming together again directly, after such service was over. The apostle said this,

  • not as a commandment
  • but, consulting their good, gives this advice, lest Satan should be busy with them, and draw them into sin; but if they had the gift of continence, they might continue apart longer; there was no precise time fixed by God, nor did the apostle pretend to fix any: or it may refer to what follows after, that he would have all men be as he was; though he laid no injunction, but left them to their liberty; unless it can be thought to regard marriage in general, and to be said in opposition to a Jewish notion, which makes marriage, a "command";

    a man, they say, is bound to this command at seventeen years of age, and if he passes twenty and does not marry, he transgresses, and makes void an affirmative precept;

    but the apostle puts it as a matter of choice, and not of obligation.

    Verse 11

    But and if she depart, let her remain unmarried or be reconciled to her husband: and let not the husband put away his wife
  • "depart"
  • If the sin of separation has been committed, a new marriage is not to be added (Matthew 5:32).

    References

    1 Corinthians 7 Wikipedia


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