Girish Mahajan (Editor)

1 Corinthians 1

Updated on
Share on FacebookTweet on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Reddit
Covid-19
Bible part  New Testament
Category  Pauline epistles
Order in the Bible part  7
1 Corinthians 1
Book  First Epistle to the Corinthians

1 Corinthians 1 is the first chapter of the First Epistle to the Corinthians in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. It is authored by Paul the Apostle and Sosthenes in Ephesus.

Contents

Text

  • The original text is written in Koine Greek.
  • Some most ancient manuscripts containing this chapter are:
  • Codex Vaticanus (AD 325-350)
  • Codex Sinaiticus (AD 330-360)
  • Codex Alexandrinus (ca. AD 400-440)
  • Codex Ephraemi Rescriptus (ca. AD 450; extant: verses 3-31)
  • Papyrus 14 (6th century; extant: verses 25-27)
  • Papyrus 11 (7th century; extant: verses 17-22)
  • This chapter is divided into 31 verses.
  • Structure

    This chapter can be grouped (with cross references to other parts of the Bible):

  • 1 Corinthians 1:1-3 = Greeting
  • 1 Corinthians 1:4-9 = Spiritual Gifts at Corinth
  • 1 Corinthians 1:10-17 = Sectarianism Is Sin
  • 1 Corinthians 1:18-25 = Christ the Power and Wisdom of God
  • 1 Corinthians 1:26-31 = Glory Only in the Lord
  • Verse 1

    New King James Version

    Paul, called to be an apostle of Jesus Christ through the will of God, and Sosthenes our brother,

    Verse 12

    New King James Version

    Now I say this, that each of you says, “I am of Paul,” or “I am of Apollos,” or “I am of Cephas,” or “I am of Christ.”

    In KJV Now this I say that everyone of you saith,.... This the apostle affirms not upon his own personal knowledge, but upon the credit of the report the house of Chloe had made unto him; and his meaning is not that every individual member of this church, but that many of them, and the far greater number of them, were in the following factions, some being for one minister, and some for another: one part of them said,

  • I am of Paul; he had been instrumental in their conversion: he had baptized some of them, and first laid the foundation of a Gospel church among them; was a solid, brave, and bold preacher of the Gospel, and was set for the defence of it; wherefore he was the minister for them, and they were desirous of being called and distinguished by his name: but there was another party that said,
  • and I of Apollos; in opposition to Paul, whom they despised, as a man whose aspect was mean; his bodily presence weak, made no figure in the pulpit; his speech low and contemptible; his discourses plain, not having that flow of words, and accuracy of expression, as Apollos had; who was an eloquent man, and mighty in the Scriptures, who coming to Corinth after the Apostle Paul, many were taken with his way of preaching; he was the preacher for them, and they chose to be called after him, and in distinction from others: whilst another company of them said,
  • and I of Cephas; or Peter, in opposition both to Paul and Apollos; who with them were new upstart ministers, in comparison of Peter, who was with Christ from the beginning, and saw his miracles, and heard his doctrines; and, besides, had the apostleship and Gospel of the circumcision, on which account they highly valued him; for these must be supposed to be the converted Jews among them, who still retained a regard to the ceremonies of the law; wherefore they fixed on Peter as their minister, and to be called by his name: but others said,
  • and I of Christ; which some take to be the words of the apostle, declaring who he was of, and for, and belonged unto; intimating that they, as he, should call no man father, or master, on earth, or be called by any other name than that of Christ. Others consider them as the words of the Corinthians, a small part of them who were very mean and contemptible, and therefore mentioned last, who chose to be known and called by no other name than that of Christians; but I rather think that these design a faction and party, to be condemned as the others. These were for Christ, in opposition to Paul, Apollos, and Cephas, and any other ministers of the word. They were for Christ without his ministers; they were wiser than their teachers; they were above being under any ministrations and ordinances; as the others attributed too much to the ministers of the Gospel, these detracted too much from them, and denied them to be of any use and service. Some persons may be, in such sense, for Christ, as to be blame worthy; as when they use his name to deceive men, or divide his interest.
  • Verse 31

    New King James Version

    that, as it is written, “He who glories, let him glory in the Lord.”

    Cited from the Old Testament: Jeremiah 9:24

    References

    1 Corinthians 1 Wikipedia


    Similar Topics
    1 Corinthians 10
    1 Corinthians 11
    1 Corinthians 12
    Topics
     
    B
    i
    Link
    H2
    L