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Tommy Anderson (ice hockey)

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Height  5 ft 10 in (178 cm)
Position  Defence

Shot  Left
Name  Tommy Anderson
Tommy Anderson (ice hockey) Tommy Anderson New York Americans 1936 HockeyGods
Born  July 9, 1910 Edinburgh, Scotland, GBR (1910-07-09)
Died  September 15, 1971(1971-09-15) (aged 61) Sylvan Lake, AB, CAN
Weight  175 lb (79 kg; 12 st 7 lb)
Played for  NHL  New York Americans  Detroit Red Wings IHL  Cleveland Falcons  Detroit Olympics AHL  Providence Reds CAHL  Philadelphia Arrows PCHL  Hollywood Wolves WCSHL  Calgary Stampeders

Thomas Linton "Tom, Cowboy" Anderson (July 9, 1911 – September 15, 1971) was a Canadian professional ice hockey defenceman who played 8 seasons in the National Hockey League for the Detroit Red Wings and the New York/Brooklyn Americans. He was born in Edinburgh, Scotland and raised in Drumheller, Alberta and spent his final years in Sylvan Lake, Alberta. He was one of three children of Alexander Robert Thomas Anderson and Margaret Jane Anderson.

Tommy Anderson (ice hockey) Ice Hockey Photo 1941 Tommy Anderson Pete Kelly HockeyGods

Playing career

Anderson played in the National Hockey League from 1934 to 1942. He played his first season for the Detroit Red Wings and his last seven for the New York/Brooklyn Americans.

For the 1941-42 season, Anderson switched positions from left wing to defence. The Americans finished last in the NHL, but Anderson had 41 points to set the league record for a defenceman. He also won the 1942 Hart Trophy as the NHL's most valuable player, becoming the first player to win the award while on a team that missed the playoffs. That was Anderson's last season in the NHL.

He was the last Hart Trophy winner to play for a non-Original Six team until 1973, when Bobby Clarke of the Philadelphia Flyers won the award. Anderson and Al Rollins are the only winners of the Hart Memorial Trophy and have not been selected to the Hockey Hall of Fame.

References

Tommy Anderson (ice hockey) Wikipedia


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