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Qutb ad Din Mawdud

Name  Qutb Mawdud
Died  September 6, 1170

Qutb ad-Din Mawdud Dirham Qutb adDin Mawdud 11491169 AD Zengid of Monsul
Children  Izz ad-Din Mas'ud, Imad ad-Din Zengi

People also search for  Izz ad-Din Mas'ud

Qutb ad-Din Mawdud (died 6 September 1170) was the Zengid Emir of Mosul from 1149 to 1169. He was a brother and successor of Saif ad-Din Ghazi I.

Biography

At the death of Zangi, his possessions were divided between his sons: Nur ad-Din received Aleppo and Saif ad-Din Ghazi Mosul, while Qutb ad-Din Mawdud received the emirate of Homs. After the death of Saif ad-Din Ghazi in 1149, Qutb ad-Din Mawdud was the first to arrive in Mosul and have himself recognized as emir; Nur ad-Din, who desired to add the city to his lands, occupied Homs and Sinjar, preparing to attack his brother. Only the intervention of veterans of the Aleppo army, who refused to take part in the fratricide war which would weaken the effort against the Crusaders and the emirate of Damascus, forced Nur ad-Din to renounce to the expedition and to reconcile with his brother.

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During his reign in Mosul, Qutb held the Seljuq prince, Suleiman-Shah b. Muhammad b. Malik Shah, as a prisoner until 1160. In 1164, Shirkuh, a general of Nur ad-Din, fought King Amalric I of Jerusalem for the control of Egypt. When he found himself in a weak situation, Nur ad-Din launched an expedition against the Principality of Antioch to divert the Christian forces. The Artuqid emirs of Mardin and Diyarbakır, as well as Mawdud, joined him in the attack, which turned to be successful: the towns of Harim and Banias were captured, and Amalric had to abandon Egypt. For the same reason, Mawdud helped his brother in the County of Tripoli in 1167.

At the beginning of 1168, Kara Arslan, the Artuqid emir of Hasankeyf, died, and Qutb ad-Din Mawdud tried to conquer that city; but he was pushed back by Nur ad-Din, who had promised to defend Arslan's successors.

Qutb ad-Din Mawdud died in September 1170. He had designed as successor his second son Ghazi II Saif ud-Din.

References

Qutb ad-Din Mawdud Wikipedia


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