Neha Patil

Porter Phelps Huntington House

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Location  Hadley, Massachusetts
NRHP Reference #  73000303
Area  1 ha
Architectural style  American Colonial
Built  1752
Opened  1752
Phone  +1 413-584-4699
Added to NRHP  26 March 1973
Porter-Phelps-Huntington House
Address  130 River Dr, Hadley, MA 01035, USA
Hours  Closed today FridayClosedSaturday1–4:30PMSunday1–4:30PMMonday1–4:30PMTuesday1–4:30PMWednesday1–4:30PMThursdayClosedSuggest an edit
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Porter-Phelps-Huntington House is a historic house and museum located at 130 River Drive in Hadley, Massachusetts. It is open seasonally, from May to October. The house contains the collection of one extended family, with objects dating from the seventeenth to twentieth centuries. It was occupied from its construction in 1752 until the 1940s, when a member of the eighth generation of the family in the house turned it into a museum. Its collection is entirely derived from the family, and the extensive archives, including the original diary of Elizabeth Porter Phelps, are held at Amherst College.

The name of the museum derives from the unusual fact that for the first three generations, the house passed through the female line, from a Porter to a Phelps to a Huntington.

The family was very prominent locally, dating back to the founding of Hadley in 1659. Some members of the extended family achieved prominence regionally, nationally, and internationally. These include Benjamin Lincoln, a major general in the Continental Army during the American Revolution; Frederic Dan Huntington, first Episcopal bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Central New York; and composer Roger Sessions.

The house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.

References

Porter-Phelps-Huntington House Wikipedia


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