Trisha Shetty (Editor)

Point Pleasant, New Jersey

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Covid-19
Country  United States
County  Ocean
Elevation  13 ft (4 m)
Zip code  08742
State  New Jersey
Incorporated  May 19, 1920
Time zone  Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Population  18,521 (2013)

Weather  5°C, Wind NW at 42 km/h, 24% Humidity
Points of interest  Community Park, Beaver Dam Park, Bay Head Historical Society a

Point Pleasant is a borough in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 18,392, reflecting a decline of 914 (-4.7%) from the 19,306 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,129 (+6.2%) from the 18,177 counted in the 1990 Census.

Contents

Map of Point Pleasant, NJ 08742, USA

Point Pleasant was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 21, 1920, from portions of Brick Township, based on the results of a referendum held on May 19, 1920. The borough was reincorporated on March 12, 1928. Point Pleasant is distinct from Point Pleasant Beach, which is a separate community.

The borough is a Jersey Shore community situated on the Barnegat Peninsula, a long, narrow barrier peninsula that divides the Barnegat Bay from the Atlantic Ocean at the Manasquan Inlet, and the borough derives its name from this location.

History

Around 1500, the area that included the future Point Pleasant was the ceremonial meeting place of the Lenape Native Americans, who called it the "Land of Tall Timber". In approximately 1665, the first European settlers arrived in the area, mainly fishermen, farmers and boat builders.

On February 15, 1850, Governor Daniel Haines and the New Jersey Legislature separated Ocean County from Monmouth County, and created Brick Township, including the Point Pleasant area, which became independent of Brick Township in 1920, though the post office carried the designation "West Point Pleasant" until 1956. According to the town's official website, many longtime residents still use that name. The town's first mayor was Melville B. Parker, chosen after J.H. Harvey declined the position after being elected. The town was initially a logging town, although logging was never a significant part of the local economy.

In 1924, the Manasquan River-Bay Head Canal was completed as part of the inland waterway. The canal, which divides Point Pleasant in half, provides a passage for boats, and is the northern most leg of the Intracoastal Waterway which traverses the East Coast of the United States along the Atlantic Ocean between New Jersey and Florida. In 1964, Senator Clifford Case introduced legislation that changed the canal's name to the Point Pleasant Canal.

Though often regarded as a summer resort, the borough's website emphasizes that it is a "year round community of approximately 19,000 residents".

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 4.167 square miles (10.790 km2), including 3.489 square miles (9.035 km2) of land and 0.678 square miles (1.755 km2) of water (16.26%).

The borough is bounded on the north by the Manasquan River, on the east by Point Pleasant Beach and Bay Head, on the south by Beaver Dam Creek and on the west by Brick Township; the borough also borders Mantoloking in Ocean County and Brielle in Monmouth County. The town is home to the Point Pleasant Canal, completed in 1925, at the northern end of the Intracoastal Waterway. The two lift bridges over the canal, at Route 88 and Bridge Avenue, can be opened as many as 300 times per day during the summer to allow boats to pass underneath as marine traffic has the right of way.

Census 2010

The 2010 United States Census counted 18,392 people, 7,273 households, and 4,982 families residing in the borough. The population density was 5,272.1 per square mile (2,035.6/km2). The borough contained 8,331 housing units at an average density of 2,388.1 per square mile (922.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 96.05% (17,666) White, 0.41% (75) Black or African American, 0.13% (24) Native American, 0.72% (133) Asian, 0.03% (6) Pacific Islander, 1.66% (305) from other races, and 0.99% (183) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.08% (935) of the population.

Out of a total of 7,273 households, 30.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.5% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.5% were non-families. 25.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.03.

In the borough, 22.1% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 24.3% from 25 to 44, 32.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.0 years. For every 100 females the census counted 94.2 males, but for 100 females at least 18 years old, it was 92.3 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $78,521 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,209) and the median family income was $94,399 (+/- $4,750). Males had a median income of $67,632 (+/- $4,111) versus $47,428 (+/- $5,097) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $36,596 (+/- $1,783). About 1.8% of families and 3.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.5% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 19,306 people, 7,560 households, and 5,231 families residing in the borough. The population density was 5,461.6 people per square mile (2,111.6/km2). There were 8,350 housing units at an average density of 2,362.2 per square mile (913.3/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 85.83% White, 5.33% African-American, Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.41%, 0.14% Native American, 0.54% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.50% from other races, and 0.69% from two or more races.

There were 7,560 households out of which 32.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.8% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.8% were non-families. 25.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the borough the population was spread out with 23.7% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 30.5% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 14.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 92.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.6 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $55,987, and the median income for a family was $64,798. Males had a median income of $50,828 versus $32,886 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,715. About 2.0% of families and 3.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.0% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.

Local government

Point Pleasant is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle. The Borough form of government used by Point Pleasant, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.

The Mayor is the head of municipal government; sees that state laws and borough ordinances are faithfully executed; presides over the Council. votes only to break ties; can veto ordinances subject to override by ⅔ majority of Council; and appoints subordinate officers with Council approval. After thirty days or upon Council disapproval, Council fills posts.

The Borough Council is the legislative body of municipality. The Council overrides a mayor's veto by ⅔ majority of all members, confirms mayor's appointments. The Council gains appointment power upon failure to confirm mayor's appointee or after office vacant for thirty days. The Council has all executive responsibility not placed in office of mayor.

As of 2016, the Mayor of Point Pleasant is Republican Robert A. Sabosik, whose term of office ends December 31, 2018. The members of the Borough Council are Borough President Antoinette "Toni" DePaola (R, 2018), William T. Borowsky (R, 2018), Joseph Furmato Jr. (R, 2016), Pamela Snyder (R, 2017), Michael Thulen Jr. (R, 2016; elected to serve an unexpired term) and John R. Wisniewski (R, 2017).

In February 2015, the Borough Council selected Michael Thulen Jr., from a list of three candidates recommended by the Republican municipal committee to fill the seat expiring in December 2016 that had been held by Robert A. Sabosik vacant until he was sworn in as mayor the previous month. In the November 2015 general election, Thulem was elected to serve the one year remaining on the term of office.

Federal, state and county representation

Point Pleasant is split between the 3rd and 4th Congressional Districts and is part of New Jersey's 30th state legislative district. Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Point Pleasant had been in the 10th state legislative district. Prior to the 2010 Census, all of Point Pleasant had been part of the 4th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections. As part of the 2013 redistricting, 1,802 residents in a wedge-shaped section in the western part of the borough were placed in the 3rd District, while the remaining 16,590 were placed in the 4th District.

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Tom MacArthur (R, Toms River). New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Christopher Smith (R). New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021) and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).

For the 2016–2017 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 10th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by James W. Holzapfel (R, Toms River Township) and in the General Assembly by Gregory P. McGuckin (R, Toms River Township) and David W. Wolfe (R, Brick Township). The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township). The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).

Ocean County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections and serving staggered three-year terms of office, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization held in the beginning of January, the board chooses a Director and a Deputy Director from among its members. As of 2015, Ocean County's Freeholders (with party affiliation, term-end year, residence and department directorship listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director John C. Bartlett, Jr. (R, term ends December 31, 2015, Pine Beach; Finance, Parks and Recreation), Freeholder Deputy Director Gerry P. Little (R, 2015, Surf City; Human Services), John P. Kelly (R, 2016, Eagleswood Township; Law and Public Safety), James F. Lacey (R, 2016, Brick Township; Transportation) and Joseph H. Vicari (R, 2017, Toms River; Senior Services and County Operations). Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Scott M. Colabella (R, 2015, Barnegat Light), Sheriff Michael Mastronardy (R, 2016; Toms River) and Surrogate Jeffrey Moran (R, 2018, Beachwood).

Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 12,681 registered voters in Point Pleasant, of which 2,336 (18.4%) were registered as Democrats, 4,026 (31.7%) were registered as Republicans and 6,311 (49.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 8 voters registered to other parties. Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 68.9% (vs. 63.2% in Ocean County) were registered to vote, including 88.5% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 82.6% countywide).

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 56.7% of the vote (5,141 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 42.4% (3,843 votes), and other candidates with 1.0% (89 votes), among the 9,161 ballots cast by the borough's 13,245 registered voters (88 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 69.2%. In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 56.5% of the vote (5,599 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 41.4% (4,103 votes) and other candidates with 1.4% (138 votes), among the 9,904 ballots cast by the borough's 13,154 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.3%. In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 60.5% of the vote (5,857 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 38.2% (3,700 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (85 votes), among the 9,683 ballots cast by the borough's 12,795 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 75.7.

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 71.6% of the vote (4,352 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 26.6% (1,619 votes), and other candidates with 1.7% (105 votes), among the 6,179 ballots cast by the borough's 13,118 registered voters (103 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 47.1%. In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 64.4% of the vote (4,606 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 27.6% (1,977 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.9% (421 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (69 votes), among the 7,152 ballots cast by the borough's 12,905 registered voters, yielding a 55.4% turnout.

Education

The Point Pleasant School District serves students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's four schools had an enrollment of 2,966 students and 227.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.04:1. Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are two elementary schools — Nellie F. Bennett Elementary School (733 students; grades PreK-5) and Ocean Road School (549; K-5) — Memorial Middle School for grades 6-8 (720) and Point Pleasant Borough High School for grades 9-12 (864).

Saint Peter School, founded in 1923, serves students in grades K-8 and operates under the supervision of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Trenton. In 2016, the school was one of ten schools in New Jersey, and one of four private schools in the state, recognized as a National Blue Ribbon School by the United States Department of Education, a recognition celebrating excellence in academics.

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 78.04 miles (125.59 km) of roadways, of which 64.28 miles (103.45 km) were maintained by the municipality, 7.86 miles (12.65 km) by Ocean County and 3.30 miles (5.31 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

State highways include Route 13, which extends a total of .56 miles (0.90 km), most of which is in the borough with a small portion in Bay Head. Route 88 traverses the borough to its eastern terminus at Route 35, just across the border with Point Pleasant Beach.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides bus service to Philadelphia on the 317 route.

Ocean Ride local service is provided on the OC3A Brick - Point Pleasant and the OC4 Lakewood - Brick Link routes.

In media

  • A fictionalized version of the town was the setting of a short-lived 2005 television show, Point Pleasant.
  • On The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, there is a recurring spoof set in the borough called "Point Pleasant Police Department", in which the host and a guest (Alec Baldwin, Bill Hader, Jake Gyllenhaal and Kevin James) play local police officers who repeatedly spit food on each other.
  • Notable people

    People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Point Pleasant include: ((B) denotes that the person was born there)

  • Antonella Barba (born 1986), contestant on the sixth season of American Idol.
  • Rachel Bolan (born 1966), bass guitar player and main songwriter of the metal band, Skid Row.
  • Agnes Boulton (1893–1968), pulp fiction writer who married Eugene O'Neill, living in her home there after their marriage.
  • Peter Cancro, CEO of Jersey Mike's Subs, who started working at the chain's Point Pleasant location as a 14-year-old.
  • Caroline Casagrande (born 1976), member of the New Jersey General Assembly representing the 11th District, who was the youngest assemblywoman ever when she was elected in 2008.
  • Fred J. Cook (1911–2003), investigative journalist and author.
  • Dick Cooke (born 1956), head coach of the Davidson Wildcats baseball team since 1991 who spent three years pitching in the minor leagues for the Boston Red Sox.
  • Tawny Cypress (born 1976), actress who appeared on K-Ville as Ginger "Love Tap" LeBeau.
  • Arnold D'Ambrosa (born 1933), politician who served in the New Jersey General Assembly from 1974 to 1976, until is career was cut short by a political scandal.
  • Michael J. Doherty (born 1963), member of the New Jersey Senate representing the 23rd Legislative District since 2009.
  • Kirsten Dunst (born 1982), actress.(B)
  • Marlene Lynch Ford (born 1954), politician, prosecutor and jurist who served in the New Jersey General Assembly.
  • Jeff Frazier (born 1982), professional outfielder who played in Major League Baseball for the Detroit Tigers in 2010.
  • Todd Frazier (born 1986), major league baseball player for the Chicago White Sox.
  • Niko Gkionis (born 1985), professional soccer player.
  • Virginia E. Haines (born 1946), politician who serves on the Ocean County Board of chosen freeholders and had served in the New Jersey General Assembly from 1992 to 1994 and as Executive Director of the New Jersey Lottery from 1994 to 2002.
  • Frankie Hayes (1914–1955), catcher who played for 14 seasons in Major League Baseball who holds the record for most consecutive games played by a catcher.
  • Laurel Hester (1956–2006), police officer who rose to national attention with her deathbed appeal for the extension of pension benefits to her domestic partner.
  • Leonard Lomell (1919–2011), United States Army Ranger who played a pivotal role in destroying German gun emplacements on D-Day.
  • "Irish" Teddy Mann (born 1951), former professional boxer.
  • A. Dale "Bud" Mayo, business executive who is the founder of Digital Cinema Destinations Corp.
  • Eugene O'Neill (1888–1953), playwright.
  • Oona O'Neill (1925–1991), daughter of Eugene O'Neill and writer Agnes Boulton, and the fourth and last wife of comic and filmmaker Charlie Chaplin.
  • Diamond Dallas Page (born 1956), former professional wrestler.(B)
  • Kurt Pellegrino (born 1979), MMA fighter who competes under the UFC brand.
  • Christie Rampone (born 1975), USA Soccer player.
  • Dawn Schiller (born 1960), under-aged girlfriend of porn star John Holmes, who was depicted in the 2003 film Wonderland.
  • Soraya (1969–2006), Grammy Award-winning, musician.(B)
  • Arthur Augustus Zimmerman (1869–1936), cycling sprint rider who won the first world championship in 1893.
  • References

    Point Pleasant, New Jersey Wikipedia


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