Harman Patil (Editor)

Franklin, New Jersey

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Country  United States
County  Sussex
Named for  Benjamin Franklin
Zip code  07416
Local time  Thursday 8:00 AM
State  New Jersey
Incorporated  April 23, 1913
Elevation  165 m
Population  4,937 (2013)
Franklin, New Jersey wwwfranklinpresbyterianchurchnjcomfilesfrelsch
Area rank  282nd of 566 in state 17th of 24 in county
Weather  -6°C, Wind W at 8 km/h, 60% Humidity

Franklin is a borough in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 5,045 reflecting a decline of 115 (-2.2%) from the 5,160 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 183 (+3.7%) from the 4,977 counted in the 1990 Census.

Contents

Map of Franklin, NJ 07416, USA

Franklin, known as the "Fluorescent Mineral Capital of the World," is located over a rich ore body containing more than 150 minerals, many of them fluorescent and 25 of which are found nowhere else on earth. Settled in the 17th century, the village known as Franklin Furnace after Benjamin Franklin, developed near iron mines and iron smelting operations located along the Wallkill River. In the early 19th century, zinc deposits in the area began to be developed commercially. For most of the century many small companies mined zinc and iron in the Franklin area. In 1897 all zinc mining efforts merged into the New Jersey Zinc Company, which was a major controlling factor in the development of Franklin. Immigrants from Russia, Britain, Hungary and Poland joined the work force at the mine. The population, 500 in 1897, had swelled to 3,000 by 1913. On March 18, 1913, the Borough of Franklin was incorporated from portions of Hardyston Township, based on the results of a referendum held on April 23, 1913.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, Franklin borough had a total area of 4.570 square miles (11.835 km2), including 4.498 square miles (11.650 km2) of land and 0.072 square miles (0.185 km2) of water (1.57%).

The borough borders Hamburg and Ogdensburg.

Franklin Furnace provides many examples of the complex mineralogy of the area.

Census 2010

The 2010 United States Census counted 5,045 people, 1,936 households, and 1,316 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,121.6 per square mile (433.1/km2). The borough contained 2,136 housing units at an average density of 474.9 per square mile (183.4/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 92.15% (4,649) White, 2.18% (110) Black or African American, 0.30% (15) Native American, 1.74% (88) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 1.23% (62) from other races, and 2.40% (121) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 7.83% (395) of the population.

Out of a total of 1,936 households, 28.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.7% were married couples living together, 13.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.0% were non-families. 26.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.15.

In the borough, 22.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 24.2% from 25 to 44, 31.5% from 45 to 64, and 13.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.3 years. For every 100 females the census counted 94.0 males, but for 100 females at least 18 years old, it was 93.1 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $62,813 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,585) and the median family income was $81,875 (+/- $11,964). Males had a median income of $49,413 (+/- $8,152) versus $45,385 (+/- $9,926) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $29,708 (+/- $2,344). About 5.1% of families and 6.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.4% of those under age 18 and 6.7% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 5,160 people, 1,898 households, and 1,324 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,150.2 people per square mile (443.7/km2). There were 1,997 housing units at an average density of 445.1 per square mile (171.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 95.10% White, 0.62% African American, 0.35% Native American, 1.47% Asian, 1.22% from other races, and 1.24% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.42% of the population.

There were 1,898 households out of which 36.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.8% were married couples living together, 11.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.2% were non-families. 24.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.22.

In the borough the age distribution of the population shows 27.5% under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 31.8% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 11.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 90.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.9 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $44,985, and the median income for a family was $52,682. Males had a median income of $41,080 versus $26,201 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $19,386. About 5.6% of families and 7.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.1% of those under age 18 and 9.9% of those age 65 or over.

Local government

Franklin is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle. The Borough form of government used by Franklin, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.

As of 2017, the Mayor of Franklin Borough is Republican Nicholas Giordano, whose term of office ends December 31, 2019. Members of the Borough Council are Council President Robert C. Dabinett (R, 2017), Dawn Fantasia (R, 2019), Joseph Limon (R, 2017), Michael Rathbun (R, 2018), Stephen M. Skellenger (R, 2019) and Gilbert J. Snyder (R, 2018).

In January 2016, the Borough Council selected Dawn Fantasia from three candidates nominated by the Republican municipal committee to fill the seat expiring in December 2016 that was vacated by Nicholas Giordano when he took office as mayor.

Joseph Martinez was sworn into office in August 2014 to fill the vacant seat of David Fanale, who had resigned from office a month earlier. Martinez was selected by the borough council from a list of three prospective candidates offered by the County Republican Committee. Martinez served in office on an interim basis until the November 2014 election, when voters chose him to fill the balance of the term through December 2016.

Federal, state and county representation

Franklin is located in the 5th Congressional District and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Josh Gottheimer (D, Wyckoff). New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021) and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).

For the 2016–2017 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Parker Space (R, Wantage Township) and Gail Phoebus (R, Andover Township). The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township). The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).

Sussex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director from among its members, with day-to-day supervision of the operation of the county delegated to a County Administrator. As of 2014, Sussex County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Richard Vohden (R, Green Township, 2016), Deputy Director Dennis J. Mudrick (R, Sparta Township, 2015), Phillip R. Crabb (R, Franklin, 2014), George Graham (R, Stanhope, 2016) and Gail Phoebus (R, Andover Township, 2015). Graham was chosen in April 2013 to fill the seat vacated by Parker Space, who had been chosen to fill a vacancy in the New Jersey General Assembly. Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Jeff Parrott (R, 2016), Sheriff Michael F. Strada (R, 2016) and Surrogate Gary R. Chiusano (R, filling the vacancy after the resignation of Nancy Fitzgibbons). The County Administrator is John Eskilson.

Elections

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 3,071 registered voters in Franklin, of which 469 (15.3% vs. 16.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,302 (42.4% vs. 39.3%) were registered as Republicans and 1,296 (42.2% vs. 44.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 4 voters registered to other parties. Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 60.9% (vs. 65.8% in Sussex County) were registered to vote, including 78.2% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 86.5% countywide).

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 1,121 votes (57.2% vs. 59.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 772 votes (39.4% vs. 38.2%) and other candidates with 58 votes (3.0% vs. 2.1%), among the 1,959 ballots cast by the borough's 3,095 registered voters, for a turnout of 63.3% (vs. 68.3% in Sussex County). In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 1,213 votes (57.2% vs. 59.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 857 votes (40.4% vs. 38.7%) and other candidates with 37 votes (1.7% vs. 1.5%), among the 2,122 ballots cast by the borough's 2,930 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.4% (vs. 76.9% in Sussex County). In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 1,269 votes (63.4% vs. 63.9% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 695 votes (34.7% vs. 34.4%) and other candidates with 28 votes (1.4% vs. 1.3%), among the 2,001 ballots cast by the borough's 2,740 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.0% (vs. 77.7% in the whole county).

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 68.6% of the vote (841 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 27.7% (339 votes), and other candidates with 3.8% (46 votes), among the 1,242 ballots cast by the borough's 3,134 registered voters (16 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 39.6%. In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 870 votes (63.0% vs. 63.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 361 votes (26.1% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 116 votes (8.4% vs. 9.1%) and other candidates with 26 votes (1.9% vs. 1.3%), among the 1,382 ballots cast by the borough's 2,936 registered voters, yielding a 47.1% turnout (vs. 52.3% in the county).

Education

Students in public school for kindergarten through eighth grade attend the Franklin Borough School District. As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its one school had an enrollment of 642 students and 45.3 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 14.2:1.

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend Wallkill Valley Regional High School which serves students from Franklin Borough, Hamburg Borough, Hardyston Township and Ogdensburg Borough, and is part of the Wallkill Valley Regional High School District.As of the 2014-15 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 655 students and 57.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.4:1.

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 26.87 miles (43.24 km) of roadways, of which 21.00 miles (33.80 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.93 miles (4.72 km) by Sussex County and 2.94 miles (4.73 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Public transportation

The county provides Skylands Ride bus service operating between Sussex and Newton.

Media

  • WSUS is a Class A radio station with an adult contemporary format serving the Sussex County area on 102.3 FM, owned by iHeartMedia and licensed to Franklin.
  • Notable people

    People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Franklin include:

  • Charles Joseph Fletcher (1922–2011), inventor and the owner / CEO of Technology General Corporation who developed an early version of the hovercraft.
  • Samuel Fowler (1779–1844), doctor, state legislator, and member of the United States House of Representatives who was one of the developers of the mines in the area.
  • Alfred B. Littell (1893–1970), politician who was mayor of Franklin in the 1950s, who also served as a member of both houses of the New Jersey Legislature and as President of the New Jersey Senate in 1951.
  • Robert Littell (1936–2014), politician, who served as a member of the New Jersey State Senate from 1992 to 2008.
  • Charles Francis Lynch (1884–1942), United States Attorney and a United States district court judge in New Jersey.
  • Alison Littell McHose (born 1965), politician who served in the New Jersey General Assembly from 2003 to 2015 until she was appointed as borough administrator.
  • Steve Nagy (1919–2016), pitcher who played for two MLB seasons for the Pittsburgh Pirates and Washington Senators, as part of a career that included 14minor league seasons.
  • Steve Oroho (born 1958), politician, who has served in the New Jersey Senate since 2008, where he represents the 24th Legislative District.
  • References

    Franklin, New Jersey Wikipedia


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