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Anthropic Bias: Observation Selection Effects in Science and Philosophy

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Language  English
Pages  240
Followed by  Human Enhancement
Author  Nick Bostrom
Genre  Non-fiction
Subject  Anthropic principle
3.9/5 Goodreads

Publication date  2002
ISBN  978-0415883948
Originally published  2002
Page count  240
Publisher  Routledge
Anthropic Bias: Observation Selection Effects in Science and Philosophy t2gstaticcomimagesqtbnANd9GcTNdmFapXvPvdVlJ
Non-fiction books  Global Catastrophic Risks, Human Enhancement, Silent Spring, The Double Helix: A P, A Room of One's Own

Anthropic Bias: Observation Selection Effects in Science and Philosophy (2002) is a book by philosopher Nick Bostrom. Bostrom investigates how to reason when suspected that evidence is biased by "observation selection effects", in other words, evidence that has been filtered by the precondition that there be some appropriate positioned observer to "have" the evidence. This conundrum is sometimes hinted at as "the anthropic principle," "self-locating belief," or "indexical information". Discussed concepts include the self-sampling assumption and the self-indication assumption.

Reviews

A review from Virginia Commonwealth University said the book "deserves a place on the shelf" of those interested in these subjects.

References

Anthropic Bias: Observation Selection Effects in Science and Philosophy Wikipedia


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