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2384 Schulhof

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Discovered by  M. Laugier
MPC designation  2384 Schulhof
Discovered  2 March 1943
Discoverer  Marguerite Laugier
Discovery site  Nice Observatory
Discovery date  2 March 1943
Minor planet category  main-belt · Eunomia
Orbits  Sun
Asteroid family  Eunomia family
Asteroid group  Asteroid belt
2384 Schulhof
Named after  Lipót Schulhof (astronomer)
Alternative names  1943 EC1 · 1943 GV 1960 FE · 1962 WL1 1970 RP · 1981 FF A909 BF
Similar  Sun, 85 Io, 812 Adele, 258 Tyche, 1996 Adams

2384 Schulhof, provisional designation 1943 EC1, is a stony Eunomia asteroid from the middle region of the asteroid belt, approximately 12 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 2 March 1943, by French astronomer Marguerite Laugier at Nice Observatory in southeastern France.

The asteroid is a member of the Eunomia family, a large group of S-type asteroids and the most prominent family in the intermediate main-belt. It orbits the Sun at a distance of 2.3–2.9 AU once every 4 years and 3 months (1,541 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.12 and an inclination of 14° with respect to the ecliptic. As the first identification at Heidelberg Observatory from 1909 is not used, the asteroid's observation arc begins with its discovery in 1943.

In April 2002, a rotational light-curve was obtained from photometeric observations at the U.S. Oakley Observatory. It gave a well-defined rotation period of 7000329400000000000♠3.294±0.006 hours with a brightness variation of 0.43 in magnitude (U=3).

According to the survey carried out by the NEOWISE mission of NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, the asteroid measures 11.5 and 11.7 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo of 0.27 and 0.28, respectively, while the Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes an albedo of 0.21 – derived form 15 Eunomia, the family's largest member and namesake – and calculates a diameter of 12.7 kilometers.

The minor planet was named in memory of Austrian–Hungarian astronomer Lipót Schulhof (1847–1921), observer of asteroids and comets, discoverer of the main-belt asteroid 147 Protogeneia, and awardee of the Lalande Prize. Naming citation was published on 17 February 1984, based on a suggestion by Brian G. Marsden (M.P.C. 8541).

References

2384 Schulhof Wikipedia


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