Neha Patil (Editor)

10th Coast Artillery (United States)

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Covid-19
Active  1924 - 1944
Branch  Army
Role  Harbor defense
Country  United States
Type  Coast artillery
Size  Regiment

The 10th Coast Artillery Regiment was a Coast Artillery regiment in the United States Army. It primarily served as the Regular Army coast artillery component of the Harbor Defenses (HD) of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island.

Contents

Lineage

Constituted 27 February 1924 as 10th Coast Artillery (Harbor Defense), and organized 1 July 1924 at Fort Adams from the following Companies- 173rd, 52nd, 97th, 102nd, 110th, 129th, 147th, and 174th. (and 7th CA Band). Only Headquarters and Headquarters Battery (HHB) activated.

  • 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalion and HHB constituted as inactive components on 31 January 1935
  • Batteries A and B activated at Fort Wetherill on 1 July 1939
  • Batteries C, D, E, and F activated 10 February 1941 at Fort Adams. Battery C assigned to Fort Greene, (Point Judith, Narragansett, RI). Batteries D, E, and F assigned to Fort Church, RI.
  • 1st and 2nd Battalions and HHB activated on 25 April 1941.
  • Battery G activated 6 January 1941 at Fort Adams, as searchlight (SL) battery.
  • Battery E transferred to HD Portland (less personnel and equipment) and redesignated Battery L, 8th Coast Artillery (United States)
  • Regimental assets transferred to HD Narragansett Bay and HHB 10th Coast Artillery reassigned to Camp Forrest, TN 14 March 1944; inactivated 10 April 1944. Unit broken up as follows:
  • HHB to 10th Artillery Group (see 10th Army Air & Missile Defense Command)
  • Disbanded 31 May 1944

    (note- according to Sawicki the Automatic Weapons battalion was converted to a Missile Battalion on 5 December 1956 (Nike), and inactivated 1 September 1958 at Fairchild Air Force Base)

    Distinctive unit insignia

  • Description
  • A Gold color and metal enamel device 1 inch (2.54 cm) in height overall blazoned: On a wreath Or and Gules, a triton torque drawing a bow and arrow aimed bendwise Or, above a sea wave Vert (Transparent Sea Green) in front of a Latin cross couped Azure.

  • Symbolism
  • The blue cross indicates the Civil War service of Battery B, 5th Coast Artillery (Now Battery E, 10th Coast Artillery). It served in the 3rd Division, 6th Army Corps during this conflict. The triton with bow and arrow symbolizes danger rising from the sea, against which the Coast Artillery in its forts must guard.

  • Background
  • The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 10th Coast Artillery Regiment on 27 February 1926. It was redesignated for the 10th Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion on 13 June 1952.

    Blazon

  • Shield
  • Gules, four cannons saltirewise base to base Or above an anchor paleways Azure fimbriated Argent; augmented of a canton per bend sinister, paly of fifteen of the field and of the fourth, base of the second.

  • Crest
  • On a wreath Or and Gules, a triton torque drawing a bow and arrow aimed bendwise Or, above a sea wave Vert (Transparent Sea Green) in front of a Latin cross couped Azure. Motto VAILLANT ET VEILLANT (Valiant and Vigilant).

    Symbolism

  • Shield
  • The red of the shield signifies Artillery; the blue anchor is taken from the coat of arms of the old Coast Defenses of Narragansett Bay; the four cannons form the Roman numeral ten. Battery D, 10th Coast Artillery claims parentage from Batter C, 2nd Coast Artillery (formerly 14th Company, Coast Artillery Corps). The latter has no coat of arms but the addition of a canton is made to indicate this parentage, but divided since one battery can claim this parentage. Battery C, 2nd Coast Artillery was part of the garrison of Fort McHenry and commanded by Captain Frederic Evans during its bombardment, 13 September 1814, and this event is taken from the coat of arms of the 2nd Coast Artillery and depicted in the fifteen stripes in the canton.

  • Crest
  • The blue cross indicates the Civil War service of Battery B, 5th Coast Artillery (Now Battery E, 10th Coast Artillery). It served in the 3rd Division, 6th Army Corps during this conflict. The triton with bow and arrow symbolizes danger rising from the sea, against which the Coast Artillery in its forts must guard.

    Background

    The coat of arms was originally approved for the 10th Coast Artillery on 27 February 1926. It was redesignated for the 10th Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion on 13 June 1952.

    Campaign streamers

    none

    Decorations

    none

    References

    10th Coast Artillery (United States) Wikipedia


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