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Rupert Bowers

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Name  Rupert Bowers

Role  Barrister
Rupert Bowers Rupert Bowers QC Doughty Street Chambers
Books  Blackstone's Guide to the Terrorism Act 2006

Rupert Bowers QC is a well-known English barrister.

Rupert Bowers Rupert Bowers QC Doughty Street Chambers

Biography

He was called to the bar in 1995 and now practises from Doughty Street chambers in London. Over the years he has represented a number of high-profile figures, including Lord Hanningfield, George Galloway, and Harry Redknapp, successfully challenging the dawn raid on his home by the City of London Police, Jermain Defoe, Bradley Wright-Phillips and Ben Thatcher at the Football Association enquiry into his tackle on Pedro Mendes.

In 2006 Bowers co-authored the Oxford University Press guide to the Terrorism Act 2006 together with other members of his chambers. Specialising in criminal law, extradition, judicial review and sport related matters he commonly represents the rights of the individual against government organisations and the police. Bowers acted for the Claimants in a High Court review of the legality of the arrest and detention of suspected terrorists in Operation Pathway. These arrests followed the photographing of confidential documents carried by the then counter terrorism chief Bob Quick outside 10 Downing Street on 8 April 2009. The case has now been considered by European Court of Human Rights. Bowers was also involved in the ultimately unsuccessful application to commit Colin Port, Chief Constable of Avon and Somerset, to prison for contempt of a High Court order.

References

Rupert Bowers Wikipedia


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