Neha Patil (Editor)

1869 in the United States

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1869 in the United States

Events from the year 1869 in the United States.

Contents

Federal Government

  • President: Andrew Johnson (D-Tennessee) (until March 4), Ulysses S. Grant (R-Ohio) (starting March 4)
  • Vice President: vacant (until March 4), Schuyler Colfax (R-Indiana) (starting March 4)
  • Chief Justice: Salmon P. Chase (Ohio)
  • Speaker of the House of Representatives:
  • until March 3: Schuyler Colfax (R-Indiana)
  • March 3–March 4: Theodore Medad Pomeroy (R-New York)
  • starting March 4: James G. Blaine (R-Maine)
  • Congress: 40th (until March 4), 41st (starting March 4)
  • January–March

  • January 1 – Sigma Nu, the first anti-hazing honor/social fraternity, is founded, at Virginia Military Institute.
  • January 20 – Elizabeth Cady Stanton is the first woman to testify before the United States Congress.
  • January 21 – The P.E.O. Sisterhood, a philanthropic educational organization for women, is founded at Iowa Wesleyan College in Mount Pleasant, Iowa.
  • March 4 – Ulysses S. Grant succeeds Andrew Johnson as the 18th President of the United States of America.
  • April–June

  • April 6 – The American Museum of Natural History is founded in New York City.
  • May 6 – Purdue University is founded in West Lafayette, Indiana.
  • May 10 – The "golden spike" is driven marking the completion of the First Transcontinental Railroad in Promontory, Utah.
  • May 15 – Woman's suffrage: In New York, Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton form the National Woman Suffrage Association.
  • May 26 – Boston University is chartered by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
  • June 1 – The Cincinnati Red Stockings open the baseball season as the first fully professional baseball team.
  • June 15 – John Wesley Hyatt patents the first plastic, Celluloid, in Albany, New York.
  • July–September

  • September 24 – Black Friday: The Fisk-Gould Scandal causes a financial panic in the United States.
  • October–December

  • November 6 – The first intercollegiate game of American football is played: Rutgers University defeats Princeton University 6–4 in a college football game.
  • December 7 – Outlaw Jesse James commits his first confirmed bank robbery, in Gallatin, Missouri.
  • December 10
  • The first American chapter of Kappa Sigma is founded at the University of Virginia.
  • The Wyoming territorial legislature gives women the right to vote, one of the first such laws in the world.
  • Undated

  • Heinz H.J. Heinz Company is founded as Heinz Noble & Company in Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania.
  • James Gordon Bennett, Jr. of the New York Herald asks Henry Morton Stanley to find Dr. Livingstone.
  • Southern Illinois University, Carbondale is founded.
  • Marcus Jastrow arrives in the United States to become rabbi of Congregation Rodeph Shalom in Philadelphia.
  • Ongoing

  • Reconstruction era (1865–1877)
  • Gilded Age (1869–c. 1896)
  • Births

  • February 2 – Smith W. Brookhart, U.S. Senator from Iowa from 1922 to 1926 (died 1944)
  • February 19 – Frederic C. Walcott, U.S. Senator from Connecticut from 1929 to 1935 (died 1949)
  • April 2 – Hughie Jennings, baseball player (died 1928)
  • April 4 – Mary Colter, architect (died 1958)
  • April 8 – Harvey Cushing, neurosurgeon (died 1939)
  • April 9 – James Thomas Heflin, U.S. Senator from Alabama from 1920 to 1931 (died 1951)
  • May 3 – Warren Terhune, U.S. Navy Commander and 13th Governor of American Samoa (died 1920)
  • June 10 – William Kenyon, U.S. Senator from Iowa from 1909 to 1922 (died 1933)
  • July 17 – Mariette Rheiner Garner, wife of John Nance Garner, Second Lady of the United States (died 1948)
  • July 20 – Howard Thurston, stage magician (died 1936)
  • August 5 – J. C. W. Beckham, U.S. Senator from Kentucky from 1915 till 1921 (died 1940)
  • December 16 – Bertha Lamme, electrical engineer (died 1943)
  • December 22
  • Edwin Arlington Robinson, poet (died 1935)
  • Nathan Paine, lumber baron (died 1947)
  • Deaths

  • January 1 – Martin W. Bates, U.S. Senator from Delaware from 1857 to 1859 (born 1786)
  • January 11 – Sophia Dallas, wife of George M. Dallas, Second Lady of the United States (born 1798)
  • February 18 – Walker Brooke, U.S. Senator from Mississippi from 1852 to 1853 (born 1813)
  • March 13 – James Guthrie, U.S. Senator from Kentucky from 1865 to 1868 (born 1792)
  • April 13 – Isaiah Rogers, architect (born 1800)
  • May 23 – Alexander O. Anderson, U.S. Senator from Tennessee from 1840 to 1841 (born 1794)
  • July 18 – Laurent Clerc, advocate for the deaf (born 1785)
  • July 22 – John A. Roebling, bridge engineer (born 1806 in Prussia)
  • July 30 – Isaac Toucey, U.S. Senator from Connecticut from 1851 to 1857 (born 1792)
  • August 6 – David J. Baker, U.S. Senator from Illinois in 1830 (born 1792)
  • September 10 – John Bell, U.S. Senator from Tennessee from 1847 to 1859 (born 1796)
  • October 8 – Franklin Pierce, 14th President of the United States from 1853 to 1857 (born 1804)
  • October 15 – William Hamlin, engraver (born 1772 in Rhode Island)
  • November 11 – Hiram Bingham I, missionary to Hawaii (born 1789)
  • November 21 – Benjamin Fitzpatrick, U.S. Senator from Alabama from 1848 to 1849 and 1853 to 1861 (born 1802)
  • December 18 – Louis Moreau Gottschalk, composer and pianist (born 1829)
  • Sandy Cornish, freed slave and farmer (born 1793)
  • References

    1869 in the United States Wikipedia


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